AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council meeting

Monday, 12 February 2024

I hereby give notice that an Ordinary meeting of Council will be held on:

Date:

Monday, 12 February 2024

Time:

9am

Location:

Bay of Plenty Regional Council Chambers

Regional House

1 Elizabeth Street

Tauranga

Please note that this meeting will be livestreamed and the recording will be publicly available on Tauranga City Council's website: www.tauranga.govt.nz.

Marty Grenfell

Chief Executive

 


Terms of reference – Council

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Members

Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Commissioner Bill Wasley

Quorum

Half of the members physically present, where the number of members (including vacancies) is even; and a majority of the members physically present, where the number of members (including vacancies) is odd.

Meeting frequency

As required

Role

·       To ensure the effective and efficient governance of the City.

·       To enable leadership of the City including advocacy and facilitation on behalf of the community.

Scope

·       Oversee the work of all committees and subcommittees.

·       Exercise all non-delegable and non-delegated functions and powers of the Council.

·       The powers Council is legally prohibited from delegating include:

        Power to make a rate.

        Power to make a bylaw.

        Power to borrow money, or purchase or dispose of assets, other than in accordance with the long-term plan.

        Power to adopt a long-term plan, annual plan, or annual report

        Power to appoint a chief executive.

        Power to adopt policies required to be adopted and consulted on under the Local Government Act 2002 in association with the long-term plan or developed for the purpose of the local governance statement.

        All final decisions required to be made by resolution of the territorial authority/Council pursuant to relevant legislation (for example: the approval of the City Plan or City Plan changes as per section 34A Resource Management Act 1991).

·       Council has chosen not to delegate the following:

        Power to compulsorily acquire land under the Public Works Act 1981.

·       Make those decisions which are required by legislation to be made by resolution of the local authority.

·       Authorise all expenditure not delegated to officers, Committees or other subordinate decision-making bodies of Council.

·       Make appointments of members to the CCO Boards of Directors/Trustees and representatives of Council to external organisations.

·       Consider any matters referred from any of the Standing or Special Committees, Joint Committees, Chief Executive or General Managers.

Procedural matters

·       Delegation of Council powers to Council’s committees and other subordinate decision-making bodies.

·       Adoption of Standing Orders.

·       Receipt of Joint Committee minutes.

·       Approval of Special Orders.

·       Employment of Chief Executive.

·       Other Delegations of Council’s powers, duties and responsibilities.

Regulatory matters

Administration, monitoring and enforcement of all regulatory matters that have not otherwise been delegated or that are referred to Council for determination (by a committee, subordinate decision-making body, Chief Executive or relevant General Manager).

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

Order of Business

1         Opening karakia. 7

2         Apologies. 7

3         Public forum.. 7

4         Acceptance of late items. 7

5         Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 7

6         Change to the order of business. 7

7         Confirmation of minutes. 8

7.1           Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 December 2023. 8

8         Declaration of conflicts of interest 42

9         Deputations, presentations, petitions. 42

Nil

10       Recommendations from other committees. 42

Nil

11       Business. 43

11.1         Council-Controlled Organisations' Draft Statements of Intent 2024-27. 43

11.2         Board review of council-controlled organisations. 52

11.3         Plan Change 34 Belk Road Rural Residential 72

11.4         Recommendation on Private Plan Change Request for Rezoning at 120, 125 Upper Ohauiti Road. 99

11.5         Destination Skatepark - Completion of Community Design. 106

11.6         Transport Resolutions Report No.49. 110

11.7         Temporary Road Closures - Events. 123

11.8         Fifteenth Avenue to Welcome Bay Detailed Design Early Pre-implementation funding. 126

11.9         Arterial Road Reviews - Recommended Transport Infrastructure Improvements. 132

11.10      Revision of the City Centre Movement Framework and Implementation of Enabling City Centre Movement Pilot Scheme. 163

11.11      Tauranga Speed Management Plan. 168

11.12      Order of candidate names for July 2024 election. 174

11.13      Executive Report 177

12       Discussion of late items. 210

13       Public excluded session. 211

13.1         Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 December 2023. 211

13.2         Exemption from Open Competition - To direct procure the fitouts of City Operations vehicles. 211

14       Closing karakia. 213

 

 


1          Opening karakia

2          Apologies

3          Public forum

4          Acceptance of late items

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open

6          Change to the order of business


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

7          Confirmation of minutes

7.1         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 December 2023

File Number:           A15489865

Author:                    Anahera Dinsdale, Governance  Advisor

Authoriser:              Shaleen Narayan, Team Leader: Governance Services

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 December 2023 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

Attachments

1.       Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 December 2023 

 

 


UNCONFIRMEDOrdinary Council meeting minutes

11 December 2023

 

 

 

MINUTES

Ordinary Council meeting

Monday, 11 December 2023

 


 

Order of Business

1         Opening karakia. 4

2         Apologies. 4

3         Public forum.. 4

3.1           Bryce Donne and Grant Downing, Element IMF - Private Plan Change 35 Tauriko Business Estate Stage 4. 4

4         Acceptance of late items. 5

4.1           Acceptance of late items. 5

5         Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 6

6         Change to the order of business. 6

7         Confirmation of minutes. 6

7.1           Minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 13 November 2023. 6

7.2           Minutes of the Council meeting held on 27 November 2023. 6

8         Declaration of conflicts of interest 6

9         Deputations, presentations, petitions. 6

Nil

10       Recommendations from other committees. 6

10.1         Appointment of Chairperson for Wastewater Management Review Committee. 6

11       Business. 7

11.1         Approval of Private Plan Change 35 (Tauriko Business Estate (Stage 4)) for Notification. 7

11.2         Te Tumu Urban Growth Areas. 9

11.3         Hull Road Intersection increased unbudgeted expenditure. 11

11.4         Cameron Road Stage 2 Detailed Business Case. 12

11.5         Accessible Streets Otumoetai Business Case Approval 15

11.6         Traffic & Parking Bylaw Amendment 48. 16

11.7         Adopt Reviewed Traffic and Parking Bylaw.. 17

11.8         Mount Maunganui Beachside Holiday Park. 18

11.9         Executive Report 18

11.10      Te Manawataki o Te Papa Ltd - Letter of Expectation for 2024-25. 20

11.11      Meetings Schedule 2024. 21

13       Public excluded session. 21

13.8         Tauriko West: Strategic Considerations for Tauriko West Enabling Works Procurement 21

11       Business   (continued) 22

11.12      Overview Report - Memorial Park Recreation Hub Programme. 22

11.13      Memorial Park Recreation Hub - Aquatics Options Report 23

11.14      Approval of Memorial Park Site Development Plan. 26

12       Discussion of late items. 27

13       Public excluded session   (continued) 27

13.1         Public Excluded minutes of the Council meeting held on 27 November 2023. 27

13.2         Strategic Property Purchase for Memorial Park Recreation Hub Project 28

13.3         Indoor Court Provision - Concept Design & Cost Estimate and Exemption to Open Competition. 28

13.4         Memorial Park Aquatic Centre - Procurement Strategy. 28

13.5         Tauranga Art Gallery land purchase and capital project update. 29

13.6         Progression of Procurement for Cameron Road Stage 2. 29

13.7         Transport Major Projects Governance and Oversight Arrangements. 29

13.8         Tauriko West: Strategic Considerations for Tauriko West Enabling Works Procurement 29

13.9         Te Tumu Urban Growth Area. 29

13.10      Sale of Smiths Farm - Selection of Preferred Purchaser/Developer 30

13.11      Exemption from Open Competition - New Inlet Works Mechanical Plant Procurement 30

13.12      Exemption to Open Competition - Prefabricated Public Convenience Block. 30

13.13      Direct Appointment under Exemption - Biofilter Replacement 30

13.14      Waterfront Projects Funding - Request for Budget Adjustments. 30

13.15      Te Manawataki o Te Papa Infrastructure Funding and Financing Levy. 30

11       Business   (continued) 31

11.12      Overview Report - Memorial Park Recreation Hub Programme   (continued) 31

14       Appreciation and closing karakia. 31

 

 


 

MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Ordinary Council meeting

HELD AT THE Bay of Plenty Regional Council Chambers,

Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga

ON Monday, 11 December 2023 AT 8.33 am

 

 

PRESENT:                    Commission Chair Anne Tolley, Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston, Commissioner Stephen Selwood, Commissioner Bill Wasley

IN ATTENDANCE:        Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Paul Davidson (Chief Financial Officer), Barbara Dempsey (General Manager: Community Services), Nic Johansson (General Manager: Infrastructure), Christine Jones (General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance), Ceilidh Dunphy (Acting General Manager: Corporate Services), Gareth Wallis (General Manager: City Development & Partnerships), Phillip Martelli (Project Leader: Urban Planning), Andy Mead (Manager: City Planning & Growth), Brad Bellamy (Project Leader: Urban Planning), Rebecca Rimmer (Senior Project Manager), Jason Spencer (Programme Manager Transport), Richard O Kane (Senior Project Manager, Karen Hay (Team Leader: Cycle Plan Implementation), Sarah Pearce (Organisational Design Lead), Mike Naude (Director of Civic Developments), Kelvin Eden (Capital Programme Manager: Major Community Amenity), Alison Law (Manager: Spaces & Places), Amanda Davies (Manager: Spaces and Places Project Outcomes), Coral Hair (Manager: Democracy & Governance Services), Shaleen Narayan (Team Leader: Governance Services), Anahera Dinsdale (Governance Advisor), Janie Storey (Governance Advisor)

 

 

1          Opening karakia

Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston opened the meeting with a karakia.

2          Apologies

Nil

3          Public forum

3.1         Bryce Donne and Grant Downing, Element IMF - Private Plan Change 35 Tauriko Business Estate Stage 4

External       Bryce Donne and Grant Downing, Element IMF

 

Key points

·       The plan change had reached a point in the process where it was looking for Councils acceptance of the plan change.

·       The change goes back a decade, with the team participating in many sessions with SmartGrowth, settlement pattern reviews, UFTI, Future Development Strategies, Regional Policy Statements and the Local Government Commission shift of the boundary from Western Bay of Plenty District Council to accommodate the business estate extension.

·       It was Stage 4 of a development started in 2015 and an extension of the type of land seen now at Tauriko being continued.

·       The submitter noted that they wished to keep the plan change moving and reiterated that the demand was there.

·       They had been carrying out earthworks for the past three years and were looking to deliver the first round of titles in March 2026, but this relied on the change of zoning and enabling works.

·       Keeping on with the momentum was important, if it was to be delayed they would not be able to deliver on presales by contractual sunset dates which would also unravel the financing for the project.

 

In response to questions

·       In response to a query in relation to quote on a response made by TBE regarding the funding of the plan change processing costs that should have been picked up by the Council Mr Donne advised that they did not want time spent on that.  He noted that there had been a directive from SmartGrowth that Council proceed with the plan change as a Council project but was not picked up so they had done the work and funded all of these costs themselves and presented the plan change to Council for processing.  The expectation was that some of this work would have been carried out by Council staff or by outsourcing and it was tough that these costs were put on them also, especially given that they had met all of the standard costs which were in the order of $1M. 

·       In relation to a query in relation to the number of jobs to be created once the site was completed, Priority One had estimated that by the completion of Stage 4 there would be 16,600 people employed in the business estate.  An estimate for this stage would be one third of that at approximately 5,000. 

·       While there may be options for some of these businesses to go to the east of the city, there was nothing else in Tauranga West which was a more popular and suitable option as it was built on the public transport work that was currently underway.

·       In answer to a question in relation to whether the balance of Tauranga West was being developed by a private plan change it was noted that this was an application to zone approximately 95Ha of business land, for which only half was presently enabled due to waste water and transport constraints.  All of the land would be zoned as distinct from Tauriko West which was a Council plan change for residential growth.  There was one private plan change in 2006 and there had been other initiatives to set the tone for this one. 

 

Discussion points raised

·       Commissioners thanked Mr Donne and Mr Downing for attending the meeting.

 

4          Acceptance of late items

4.1         Acceptance of late items

Resolution  CO23/23/1

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council

Accepts the following late public excluded items for consideration at the meeting:

•      Tauriko West: Strategic Considerations for Tauriko West Enabling Works Procurement

•      Te Tumu Urban Growth Area

The above items were not included in the original agenda because they were not available at the time the agenda was issued, and discussion cannot be delayed until the next scheduled Council meeting because decisions are required in regard to these items.

Carried

 

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open

Nil

6          Change to the order of business

Nil

7          Confirmation of minutes

7.1         Minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 13 November 2023

Resolution  CO23/23/2

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 13 November 2023 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

7.2         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 27 November 2023

Resolution  CO23/23/3

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the minutes of the Council meeting held on 27 November 2023 be confirmed as a true and correct record, subject to the foregoing correction:

·       Page 11 – Item 11.1 – resolution (c) add the words “Parking Strategy” to the end of the sentence.

Carried

 

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest

Nil

9          Deputations, presentations, petitions

Nil

10        Recommendations from other committees

10.1       Appointment of Chairperson for Wastewater Management Review Committee

Resolution  CO23/23/4

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Appointment of Chairperson for Wastewater Management Review Committee".

(b)     Appoint Spencer Webster (Nga Potiki) as the Chairperson of Wastewater Management Review Committee.

Carried

 

11        Business

11.1       Approval of Private Plan Change 35 (Tauriko Business Estate (Stage 4)) for Notification

Staff             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance

Phillip Martelli, Project Leader: Urban Planning

Andy Mead, Manager: City Planning & Growth

 

Key points

·       An amendment to paragraph 14 of the report was noted advising that a formal response had been received and currently been assessed from the applicant. Approval was being sought to delegate approval of any changes to the General Manager Strategy, Growth and Governance to the plan change documentation as a result of the additional information process. These would be confined to those matters raised in the S92 report.

·       The change was consistent with the Council’s strategic direction, particularly SmartGrowth, UFTI  and other urban form transport initiatives for the city.

·       There were many resolutions from the SmartGrowth Committee Leadership Group to Council supporting and identifying the need for the plan change to occur.

·       The key issue was whether to accept the plan change and proceed with staff time  to be fully cost recovered.  Council may wish to consider partial recovery of staff time for involvement in the plan change being covered by rates and external time covered by the applicant.

 

In response to questions

·       In response to the structure planning and SmartGrowth resolutions for 2016, this was completed and called the Western Corridor Strategic Study looking at high level structure planning work, including waste water servicing and other elements.  It was handed over to Kainga Ora as part of the work that fed into the specified development project.

·       Commissioners noted that having those comprehensive structures in place provided the guidance and framework for subsequent plan changes otherwise Council could potentially end up with plan changes that were not connected up.  It was noted that it was a high level strategic study of urban development that did not get down to the placement of roading, but did look at how all of the areas could interconnect. High level studies were currently being undertaken which was also flowing through to other projects. 

·       In relation to what the Council timing was likely to be for the plan change, if the private one had not gone ahead, it was noted that the resolutions in 2016 was to get the wider SmartGrowth’s groups approval to get the structure plans and plan changes.  There was no specific decision made at that point as to whether the changes would be either Council or privately led.  Council were initially focused on Te Tumu and Tauriko West and no time framing, structure planning or plan change was ever built into the thinking.  It was always considered that this one would be a privately led change as it was a smaller and discreet area.  In terms of resourcing ability to progress a plan change, it would have depended on the priority of the Council at the time and whether it took priority over the work being done at that stage or as a second order priority some time further out in the future. 

 

·       In response to a query as to what outstanding matters that needed to be addressed by the applicant, it was noted that staff were still going through those with an example being in the application they talk about having a document by reference Stormwater Management Plan which had a number of other implications. That document had to be notified at the same time as the plan change and incorporated into the plan, but was not ready at this stage and was probably not what the applicant wanted, so staff need to negotiate how to put the key criteria within the plan change itself.  There was also some clarity needed around infrastructure and the future proofing of that and needed to be clear about who was required to pay for what.  

·       In relation to the significance and engagement policy being described as medium significance it was advised that while this was a significant issue, the policy was in relation to  trigger a special consultative process which was not required for this decision.  It was requested that this be made clearer in future reporting.

 

Discussion points raised

·       Commissioners noted that they wished to discuss the approach with regards to the private plan change process and the responsibility of the Council was to undertake this type of planning as this was key to the development of the western corridor and it was considered that the responsibility for that lay with the Council the same as it did with the residential development in that area.

·       A review and consideration needed to be undertaken in 2024 as to when it was or was not appropriate to use private plan changes and to gain an understanding of how Council saw the overall development occurring in the city and sub region.  Commissioners considered part of that responsibility would be to undertake the plan changes necessary to give effect to that direction.

·       Concern was expressed regarding the statement that the plan change primarily benefits the applicant and Commissioners considered it was more about providing business and employment land for the city and the sub region, which extends well beyond the immediate private benefit in terms of the economic wellbeing of the city. Council needed to take responsibilities that included an overall benefit to the community.

·       Council, in previous times. had aggregated responsibility to think and plan long term with sufficient planning in place to enable employment and housing.  The result was too little too late and now Council had to catch up.  It was questioned whether Council were reliant on private sector initiatives to avoid Council paying expenses in advance when it was the responsibility of Council to ensure that zoning, planning and development of land was ahead of the curve not behind it which required the Council to invest in resources, skills and capabilities to meet its obligations. 

·       Commissioners commended the developers for taking the initiative to effect the plan change which would have resulted in an undersupply of land for commercial and industrial purposes.  The key message was that Council needed to be much more proactive in its long term planning to enableland development in a timely way to at least cover its own costs.  There were no costs in the Long Term Plan to cover these so would result in an additional impost.

·       Recommendation (e) was deleted and replaced with a delegation to the Chief Executive to negotiate some cost sharing with the applicant to signal Council’s responsibility for ensuring there was significant industrial land in the area to manage growth.

Resolution  CO23/23/5

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Approval of Private Plan Change 35 (Tauriko Business Estate (Stage 4)) for Notification".

(b)     Accepts, in accordance with RMA Schedule 1 cl 25, Private Plan Change 35 Tauriko Business Estate (Stage 4) to the operative Tauranga City Plan for public notification. 

(c)     Authorises the General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance to arrange the public notification process in accordance with the provisions of the First Schedule to the Resource Management Act 1991.

(d)     Delegates authority to the General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance to approve any minor and technical changes to the Proposed Private Plan Change 35 documentation and Technical Reports as required prior to public notification, and that any such changes to be within the confines of the s92 Request for Further Information.

(e)     Delegates to the Chief Executive to negotiate some cost sharing with the applicant to signal Council’s responsibility for ensuring there was significant industrial land in the area to manage growth.

Carried

 

11.2       Te Tumu Urban Growth Areas

Staff             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance

Andy Mead, Manager: City Planning & Growth

Brad Bellamy, Project Leader: Urban Planning

 

A replacement Timeline was tabled.

 

Key points

·       Update on all of the work streams for Te Tumu and to seek Council support and reconfirm it as a priority growth area and to prioritise the work.  An updated timeline was tabled and moved into the open part of the meeting outlining the extent of the work required and an explanation.  

·       A report in September 2023 indicating a 2040 timeframe for the site was a misunderstanding as it was never the case that the issues, planning and rezoning would be pushed out to 2040.  The reference to 2040 was with the ability to fund and deliver the infrastructure within the upcoming Long Term Plan as some key infrastructure for Te Tumu was not included in the draft 2024-34 plan and needed to be considered through that process. 

·       There were opportunities to bring forward the Te Tumu funding as off balance sheet funding could be found.  There was a lot of infrastructure to build which brought about realities around the time and complexity it would take to deliver these.

·       In terms of the plan change time frame, there were a number of technical reports that either needed to be updated or started again due to the recent government changes to the national direction.  Indications from the government were to have another look at the national directions and RMA planning processes.  As a result of this Council may find that some of the current challenges may fall away or become easier which may also reduce the time to notification and becoming operative.  Staff would continue to report back and advise of the outcomes once they were known. 

 

In response to questions

·       The timetable sits within the context of current planning system under the RMA and all of the technical assessments that needed to be relooked at around the freshwater perspective and biodiversity to ensure that Council continue to meet the requirements.  A query was raised as to whether there was other items that could be brought forward to get some of the base work done earlier such as policy assessments, it was noted that much of that work had been drafted to a point of making a line in the sand.  The tabled information covers the plan change drafting which was much longer to reflect that concurrently all of that type of work would continue at the same time, with no intention of waiting and had been operating the whole time. 

·       The table included the ability to bring items forward and reflected the uniqueness of some of the work streams and to move forward and start sooner. 

·       While issues around water and biodiversity may be constraints around housing, Council still valued water and the importance of looking after the environment and biodiversity.  , Council had lost a lot and do need to protect and look after what we have and to find a balance to deliver on outcomes for the environment and for housingIn order to get that balance compromises would have to be made.  The work around the wetlands was a good example of the balance of looking after, protecting and providing more in terms of extent.

 

Discussion points raised

·       Commissioners considered that the report gave reasons why the development may not happen and did not emphasis the necessity for it to be developed for housing. There was a shortfall of 5,000 houses  in the city and while there were complex issues to revolve, it was critical and Council do this as quickly as possible. Tauranga had the highest cost of housing to median household income and the latest tsunami reports show that this was the safest area for development at Papamoa. 

·       Commissioners considered that a target to rezone should be set end of 2025 as there was a better chance of it proceeding with the change of government and the signals coming from them especially around National Policy Statements for freshwater. If more resources were needed, Commissioners ask that more be obtained so that the work could proceed as the housing gap was getting bigger by  day and it needed to be a top priority to get ahead of the housing crisis. 

·       It was considered that if Council were in a position to go to central government with the planning done and consents lined up, indicating that the problem was with infrastructure funding, a partnership with government could be requested to fund so that the houses central and local government desperately need could be delivered.  The report clearly sets out a myriad of issues to deal with, but at the very least Council needed to ensure that the planning was in place and attempts being made to resolve those issues.  

·       When the LTP 2024-34 was put out for consultation, Council took out the infrastructure funding and signalled clearly with the land owners that it was because of the headroom in the Councils budget, but it does not stop the development from proceeding.  Council had been working with developers on other methods of funding the infrastructure, but never precluded any of those discussions however the intention was to continue with the planning 

·       Council had engaged with Ministers on the national policy statement on fresh water and had real life examples, so if Council had a best case proposition that picked  up some of that it would allow the land owners to do their engagement with the government and outline the criticality of getting some legislative change and making sure that it was progressed.

·       Commissioners noted that Council had its best chance at what was happening at present with the work with the Kaituna 14 Trust and the attitude of the Trustees and beneficiaries, the attitude of the landowners and signals from the incoming government, Council should be aiming at the first quarter of 2026 to notify as the best case and that be included in resolution (c).

Resolution  CO23/23/6

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Te Tumu Urban Growth Areas" and notes the update on key matters.

(b)     Reconfirms Te Tumu as a priority urban growth area.

(c)     Reconfirms prioritising work on the Te Tumu structure planning and rezoning project to prepare for notification of a Plan Change to rezone Te Tumu concurrent with process with Tumu Kaituna 14, by the first quarter of 2026.

(d)     Notes that regular updates will be reported to Council through 2024 as various workstreams, including infrastructure corridor and Kaituna Overflow workstreams are further advanced.

Carried

Attachments

1        Tabled- Te Tumu Urban Growth Area Timeline

 

11.3       Hull Road Intersection increased unbudgeted expenditure.

Staff             Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure Services

Rebecca Rimmer, Senior Project Manager

Jason Spencer, Programme Manager - Transport

 

Key points

·       Seeks an increase in budget to provide safe access across the railway tracks to the skate park within the transport budget.

·       The work includes some track work to cover increased requirements from KiwiRail.

 

In response to questions

·       Commissioners noted that they had conducted a site visit with KiwiRail personnel and discussed the crossings and access from Blake Park to the skate parknoting their concern around the proposals of a new accessway across Hull Road to connect into the overflow carpark on the Blake Park side. There were a number people of all ages that just walk across the railway line as there were no formed accessways to get into Blake Park to play or watch the rugby and netball. 

·       It was noted that the design had been broken into two parts, one being a design that sat on the southern side of the track with the crossing having gone through KiwiRail approvals from a specification point of view for weld points.  This crossing would be in place in time for the skate park opening and the Maunganui Road, Tui to Hull Road to be completed at the same time.  The Transport team were working with the Spaces and Places team and KiwiRail, the crossing was 95% ready to proceed.

·       A crossing would be installed that would take people from the Blake Park overflow carpark, across Hull Road and link with the pedestrian crossing on the southern side.  There were constraints with the timeframe to get it commissioned and completed by the time the skatepark opened.

·       The second portion on the northern side from the carpark, a further design was ongoing that was set apart from first phase to get the public across to Blake Park in a safe manner by not crossing Hull Road, with fencing installed to herd them across to another crossing on the north side and into the Blake Park area.  The discussion with the design and how the tracks were laid out was still ongoing with the weld points, the curvature slant of the tracks and Kiwi Rail wanting to stack trains.  There had also been talk of a more expensive option of a bridge to take people across the area, but keeping to the two pedestrian crossings was the preferred option astthis stage.

·       In response to a query as to why the Council were paying $246,000, it was noted that discussions had been held with KiwiRail and a formal request was being made for at least a 50/50 cost share for all of the work and safety measures undertaken.  

 

Discussion points raised

·       Commissioners complimented the Transport and Places and Spaces teams for working on different projects together to ensure that everyone was kept as safe as possible and proposing sensible solutions. 

Resolution  CO23/23/7

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Hull Road Intersection increased unbudgeted expenditure."

(b)     Approves an updated project budget for the construction of $765,250 (the current budget is $400,000).

Carried

 

11.4       Cameron Road Stage 2 Detailed Business Case

Staff             Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure Services

Richard O Kane, Senior Project Manager

 

External       Nick Gurr, Project Director, GHD

                     Andrew Smith, Team Leader – Infrastructure Investment and Economics, GHD

 

The presentation is attached to the minutes

 

Key points

·       Report provides an overview of the Cameron Road Stage 2 detailed business case and to seek Council endorsement for its submission to Waka Kotahi for approval with the recommendations as noted in the report.

·       The business case sets out the key challenges along the corridor, connecting with Stage 1 at 17th Avenue extending to Chang Road.

·       Key challenges include the lack of attractive travel choices, the ability to enable ongoing growth and intensification, the safety and severance for users wanting to cross the corridor and the importance of recognising the opportunity to celebrate the unique places that the community value.

·       Four investment objectives had been identified including to improve safety to all users, supporting the spatial plan goals, reducing reliance on private vehicles and acknowledging the historical significance of the corridor. 

·       The team had considered a wide range of ways to address the problems by developing a list of options following a number of workshops and hui with the community, stakeholders, iwi and project partners.

·       Developed three short list options with a preferred hybrid option including a two way cycle lane, staged implementation of dedicated bus lanes along the majority of the corridor, the inclusion of more signalised crossings for pedestrians and cyclists and signalised intersections to improve turning movements, in situ stormwater treatment areas, environmental enhancements and cultural design elements along parts of the corridor.  

·       Stage 2 helps Council to achieve the full benefits from Stage 1 and incorporates some of the lessons learnt into the detailed design phase, including  bike racks, seating and planting to create a space where people want to spend time as well as travel through.

·       Stormwater treatment had been included in the design to help reduce some of the contaminant run off into waterways.

·       Key focus to provide a variety of different travel options to move more people and enable more growth intensification. 

 

In response to questions

·       In response to a query as to whether it was too late to update the business case to include the provision of the additional homes and intensification, they were constrained as to how they were able to calculate the monetised cost benefits in terms of what benefits could be claimed for the transport investment provided.  The next stage for the business case was to go through the Waka Kotahi approval process, along with a separate staff report and it was noted that more details information could be provided in that report to strengthen the narrative around the transport, housing and growth elements to ensure the story was told. 

·       In response to the number of people using the corridor as a through route and whether the views  had been captured, and how many people used the toll road and how many used Cameron Road to get to and from their destination ,it was noted the business case process had engagement throughout.  Included were visioning exercises with stakeholders, the community and a virtual engagement room where information was uploaded at each stage.  This had received over 3,000 visits, letter drops were delivered along the corridor, there were pop up stalls, staff had attended events.  Further engagement had recently been completed on the preferred option with a comprehensive process including door knocking, visiting businesses, business associations as well as extensive advertising across channels to get as broad as possible coverage across Stage 2. 

·       It was requested that staff continue to outline the messages of how the corridor would change overtime so that the community understood what was happening.  The need to continue conversation and making the wider network aware of the changes and connections of how the projects all fit together within the city and recognising the impacts on businesses and residents while the work was occurring.

·       There was an opportunity to build on some of the matters within the executive summary with the corridor being an urban transformation approach and the reconnection of the western and eastern sides of the peninsula through the proposal.,  The corridor has multiple roads leading into the area, it would be a public transport corridor and connect with pedestrian crossings making it a multipurpose, multi modal corridor that would need compromises. 

·       Plantings needed to include shade for people using the corridor and be fit for purpose.

·       As Council go into the detailed design phase, it was queried whether the concession cost of  tolls on Takitimu Drive of $7M would be built in to the budget as well as the traffic management that needed to happen at each stage of the construction.  It was noted that Council were looking at a different approach with Waka Kotahi of integrated management as the five stages of network projects were rolled out.  This would avoid impacts on the local network than those was experienced with Stage 1.  The $7M revenue would be built into the design phase conversations.  Council were entering Stage 2 with a higher level of awareness and were doing all it could to do to separate the works from the transport .  With five phases of work, they would have a greater level of confidence on the location of the inground services and less areas open at one time so the overall impact on the network would be less. 

·       Places and Spaces needed to be involved in the landscaping, planting and maintenance from the start so that it did not result in areas that were hard to maintain and full of rubbish and weeds like the areas in Stage 1.  Shade was crucial and should be provided by a mixture of native and deciduous trees. 

·       It was good to see the long cultural history, but history did not stop at the Battle of Tauranga and a query was raised what other layers would be overlaid.  17th Avenue was identified as one of the major pre-European pathways to the Kopurererua Valley and therefore should be identified. Tauranga 2 did some mapping of all of the historical places as another layer to bring post-colonial history into the project .  Any artworks along it need to be done transparently and assumes that the 1% was included and requested that this also go through the Public Art and Culture Policy so it was much more transparent.  It was noted that this would occur. 

·       Delivery partners and stakeholders would be consulted throughout the detailed design phase.  This would be an interactive process with multiple workshops set up and continuous working with Places and Spaces and City Waters to ensure they were delivering the zonal detailed design in line with the five zonal approach and taken on the whole journey.  In relation to the plantings, direction would be taken from Places and Spaces.

·       In answer to a query as to whether the Greerton  Retail Association were happy with the village option, it was noted that people in the Greerton area had been involved in extensive engagement over last few months and staff had meet with the general public, iwi and hapu partners, business stakeholders and the like, all of whom had access to the website.  Extensive feedback had been received which were mostly along lines of apprehension of the construction process based on the experiences of Stage 1 rather than the outcome.  In the continuous engagement there was an option to have a communal project office in Greerton for the Stage 2 detailed design for reconstruction phases.  Visits had been made to businesses along the corridor, with each having one on one time and the dialogue had been kept open outside the engagement period to retain that continuously into new year.  It would remain a collaborative process throughout the whole delivery and would provide the visibility needed. 

·       It was noted that the message to use Council’s own landscapers for the landscaping and beautification work had been clearly understood and would be implemented. 

·       In response no allowance was being made for waste water and water main replacement, it was noted that this was a Council project so was not included in the Waka Kotahi business case and would be separately funded.  This work was not as extensive or complex with regards to connections and services as Stage 1.

·       In relation to the overall cost and how the development contribution on the Te Papa peninsula fitted in and integrate with the transport portion of the collection it was noted that this information would be provided at a later date.

·       The triggers for clear provision of bus lanes was set out and documented in a Memorandum of Understanding with the Bay of Plenty Regional Council.

·       In relation to the engagement a suggestion of possibly setting up a community reference group to test and sound off through the construction period made up of  residents, schools, users and the like it was noted that while this process was to get approval for the business case, it was a point to give consideration to as part of a feedback mechanism during the project.

·       The Chief Executive noted that the Infrastructure Acceleration fund included $60M for increased intensification and more housing. There was acknowledgement by government agencies that this was very much a housing project. 

 

Discussion points raised

·       Commissioners noted that they were supportive of business case with the principle benefit of increasing wider growth needs for the city, increasing housing and the opportunity to enable another 12-15,000 homes along Cameron Road.  The undersupply of land had led to constant increase in house prices across the city.  This along with transport was the most significant challenge  as to how a change to land cost could be brought about to bring more housing into the future or mitigate the current house prices to bring them down.  It was considered that the narrative of the business case did not explain that sufficiently and was constrained by Waka Kotahi restraints with a focus on transport not housing benefits when the primary reason for doing the work was to enable and unlock housing intensification along Cameron Road. 

·       The economic benefits were not being assessed within the business case and if this was only recognised from the probability of costs from a transport point of view it may become uneconomic. Commissioners were worried that Council were consistently putting forward projects on the basis of Waka Kotahi guidelines and not extolling and explaining the wider social and economic benefits of the provision of housing and the amount that housing had increased in the city over a five year period because of constraints.  

·       Commissioners acknowledged mana whenua for the enormous amount of work put in on their behalf.

·       It was requested that recommendation (b) include a note of the comments made by Commissioners in relation to the wider commentary being included during the meeting.

·       Commissioners acknowledge the huge amount of work undertaken to date that would result in transforming the city.  

Resolution  CO23/23/8

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Cameron Road Stage 2 Detailed Business Case".

(b)     Endorses the Detailed Business Case for submission to Waka Kotahi Board for approval, noting the comments made by Commissioners especially in relation to the wider commentary being included. 

Carried

Attachments

1        Presentation- Cameron Road Stage 2 - PDF

 

At 10.27am the meeting adjourned.

At 10.44am the meeting reconvened.

 

11.5       Accessible Streets Otumoetai Business Case Approval

Staff             Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure Services

Karen Hay, Team Leader: Cycle Plan Implementation

 

In response to questions

·       The business case was a result of the spatial plan work and issues that the community had raised regarding safer cycleways and better ways to travel.  

·       Following the business case with Waka Kotahi, it would lead into the detailed design process for which parts would be in a transitional approach to provide an opportunity to test the design and get real live feedback.  This would enable staff to deal with difficult and constrained parts of the network.  Part of the design process was to engage with the community, mana whenua and other key stakeholders and an opportunity to deal with the varying requirements of residents and users and see how it would actually work.

·       In response to a query as to whether the response to feedback included in the report had been relayed back to those who had provided it, it was noted that an initial response acknowledging their comments had been made outlining the procedure to be undertaken.  Further communication would be held with them once the business case had been approved and enable people through various mediums to provide feedback. 

·       In answer to a question as to whether there had been any testing in the percentage of support, it was advised that there had been and was why they were including a transitional approach at the real pain points to receive real live feedback and testing. 

·       It was noted that there were sections where the community had raised concerns about types of interventions put forward, including the location of bus stops, bus in-lanes, cycleways, pedestrians and carparking and trying to manage all  activities within a constrained corridor.

·       A query was raised as to whether the community fully understood what Council were trying to achieve and how it fitted in with Cameron Road and across the city as a wider network picture.  It was noted that at a number of the drop in sessions, the engagement with stakeholders was in the understanding of the big picture.  The level of engagement with the Spatial Plan was undertaken and touch points fully demonstrated some of the outcomes around growth and how this project supported other projects.  It was difficult to go from a strategic outcome vision to an “outside my door” change and was about how to articulate  the trade offs for people as best they could. 

·       Certain areas that were transformational and part of managing the risk of various users. An example included at Windsor Park where there were a number of students and in-lane bus stops was challenging and unknown until the geotechnical investigations were carried out.  It could mean investing a minimal amount of money for a permanent solution or have to invest more for something that was transformational and had bigger impacts.  The ability to test that would help to inform the permanent solution, and where there was an opportunity to be agile it would be taken on board.

·       In response to a query regarding the community response and the impact on local residents particularly around the intermediate and high school it was noted that through the initial options analysis residents were keen to see a one-way system from Charles Street to Anne Street in place which maintains parking. However when entering the next stage of the project, there was a big divide from the community to limit the one way and reduce the extent of it.  This still provided the opportunity to extend it but there were some issues to be worked through with the school wanting to implement a “kiss and ride” and needed to talk to the residents about the impacts of parking with that.

·       In regards to the significant  issues with 11th Avenue and Waihi Road with businesses and accessways, staff had worked with them in terms of what the options would look like and adjusted the design to accommodate access and looked at alternative measures of mitigation of safety issues. 

·       In relation to the timing with the network integration function, the focus was on all of the project works that were occurring.  Staff had been in discussion with Auckland Transport on how they had managed these situations and conversations had also been held with Waka Kotahi to build a team to manage it.  Unless an attractive proposition was provided, behaviour would not change.  The improvements were being provided to make public transport and other modes of transport more accessible and attractive.  It needed to be approached on a network programme basis about changing the city, growing the city and enabling housing and alternate modes of transport.  Council would be working with partners including the Bay of Plenty Regional Council, Western Bay of Plenty District Council and Waka Kotahi. It was also important to be excellent in delivery as people would only tolerate the disruption for so long.    

 

Discussion points raised

·       Commissioners acknowledged that huge workload for a lot staff, doing a great job listening to the community feedback and recognising the importance of moving the city forward and the need to manage growth. 

Resolution  CO23/23/9

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Accessible Streets Otumoetai Business Case Approval".

(b)     It recommends that the Council approves:

(i)      The business case for Accessible Streets for Ōtūmoetai noting that any minor changes to the business case be approved by the General Manager Infrastructure.

(ii)      The revised design and the associated design changes in response to community feedback as outlined in Appendix A of this report.

(iii)     In the event that Waka Kotahi partnership funding and the business case is approved, the project proceeds to final design and implementation, noting that any substantial design changes will be consulted on with directly affected residents only.

Carried

 

11.6       Traffic & Parking Bylaw Amendment 48

Staff             Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure Services

 

In response to questions

·       The carpark removals from the design stage had already been approved, this was incorporating tweaks that had been made with the shifting of bus stops.

·       The timing for the clearways and parking provision on the Stage 1 corridor would be provided to Council for consideration in March 2024.

·       The throughput had been modelled and parking arrangements were suited around the time limit for the morning and afternoon peak of the bus lanes, with the parking areas being marked and remain there for use until a decision was made otherwise to change the lane to a bus lanes.  This was likely to be when a proposal was put forward in March 2024 and would only be implemented once a decision was made.

·       With Cameron Road Stage 1 being completed by the end of the year, an education component was underway to educate those using side roads where there was a cycle lane.  Feedback had been received on signage, noting that while it may be located in the right place from a transport perspective, it was confusing from a practicality perspective with drivers not only watching for cars, but cyclists as well. It was suggested that this be investigated further.  A travel safe campaign was being launched within the next few days and would include the concerns raised as it would only get worse once more cyclists used the paths. 

Resolution  CO23/23/10

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Traffic & Parking Bylaw Amendment 48".

(b)     Resolves to adopt the proposed traffic and parking controls as per Appendix A relating to minor changes for general safety, operational or amenity purposes, to become effective on or after 12 December 2023 subject to appropriate signs and road markings being installed.

(c)     Resolves to adopt the proposed traffic and parking controls as per Appendix B relating to the Cameron Road Multi-modal Project (Stage 1), to become effective on or after 12 December 2023 subject to appropriate signs and markings being installed.

Carried

 

11.7       Adopt Reviewed Traffic and Parking Bylaw

Staff             Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure Services

 

Resolution  CO23/23/11

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Adopt Reviewed Traffic and Parking Bylaw ".

(b)     Approves the recommendation of the Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee of 4 December 2023 and adopts the draft Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2023 (Attachment One), pursuant to section 145 of the Local Government Act and section 22AB of the Land Transport Act to be brought into force on 20 December 2023.

(c)     Resolves that, in accordance with section 155 of the Local Government Act 2002, the proposed draft Traffic and Parking Bylaw is the most appropriate and proportionate way of addressing the perceived problem and does not give rise to any implications under the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990.

(d)     Delegates to the General Manager Infrastructure, the authority to make any minor edits or presentation amendments to the draft Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2023 to correct any identified errors or typographical edits, before the bylaw comes into force.

(e)     Notes that Council resolutions made under the current Traffic and Parking Bylaw, as set out in the Traffic and Parking Bylaw Attachment[1], remain operative.

Carried

 

11.8       Mount Maunganui Beachside Holiday Park

Staff             Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Community Services

Sarah Pearce, Organisational Design Lead

 

Discussion points raised

·       Commissioners noted that discussions would be held with tangata whenua, the Mauao Trust and Bay Venues Limited in the new year.  It was requested that the item lay on the table until these discussions had taken place.

Resolution  CO23/23/12

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)        Lays the report "Mount Maunganui Beachside Holiday Park" on the table until early 2024.

Carried

 

11.9       Executive Report

Staff             Marty Grenfell, Chief Executive

                     Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure Services

Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Community Services

Paul Davidson, Chief Financial Officer

Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance

Ceilidh Dunphy, Acting General Manager: Corporate Services

Gareth Wallis, General Manager: City Development & Partnerships

 

Infrastructure

In response to questions

·       A query had been received at the Bay of Plenty Mayoral Forum regarding regional waste streams, as Whakatāne Mayor Victor Luca had brough up a proposal for a $30M plant for tyre disposal, requesting that it be included in the Regional Waste Strategy discussions.  It was noted that while there had been discussions there was  no solution at this stage. This would need to be looked at further and a business case for investment still needed internal scrutiny before any decisions could be made.  An update of how this was being progressed would be provided.

·       The community engagement on slope hazards and the concerns raised by some home owners mostly relating to slope stability being added to a property.  Council have an obligation to provide this material which had been on property files since 2002.  The maps included in the report were an update of current maps with rainfall data and slip hazards and the like.  Residents attending the drop in sessions appreciated the opportunity to discuss matters with the experts in the room.  The numbers attending the sessions were low in light of the 11,000 letters sent out. 

·       While there were no big gains in saving money with the tunnelling technology used on Birch Avenue, there was a lot of  value to businesses by not having to close the road while the works were being carried out.   Actual data could be provided if required providing a comparison between tunnelling and an open cut which would have been more disruptive.  It was agreed that these less disruptive measures should be utilised in future works.

 

Community Services

Key points

·       Noted in the report were a number of community initiatives involving staff and highlighted the initiatives the Museum team were picking up within the community. 

 

Discussion points raised

·       Congratulations to the Contact Centre team for their recent award.

·       Acknowledgement to the team for the Marine Parade Coastal Path, the width accommodated all modes of path users and there were already a big number of people using it.

·       Acknowledgement of the Events that the staff were preparing for, 54 large events planned over the summer months, many of which would also assist with the activation of the CBD. 

·       Acknowledgement of the Pike Aki cadet programme and the work being done for youth and cadets finding secure employment and the intern and scholarship programmes that build capability in Council and with the wider sector.

 

Chief Financial Officer

In response to questions

·       The new airport lights that had been implemented would provide planes with a greater ability to deal with poor weather approaches and minimise disruption at the airport. 

·       In relation to additional capacity of flights there would be extra hours added in to the flights, but with the A3-20 having engine repairs over the next few years, it would take most of that capacity from regional airports.  There would not be any more capacity unless there were more planes.  The objective was for larger 72 seat aircraft but that was subject to Air NZ scheduling.  They recognise the capacity into the city and every attempt was being made to undertake that to make it so.

·       Staff were engaged in an update to the master plan for the airport including the use of industrial land, carparks, runway capacity and the like.  Future modelling would determine if a parking building was required.

 

Strategy and Growth

Discussion points raised

·       It was noted that the Takawaenga unit was well received in Northland, sharing their learnings, exchanging of ideas that would be helpful on how Council could improve relationships which were about people to people and not legislation.

 

Corporate Services

Key points

·       Highlight of the two Digital Services teams at the Local Government Information Management awards as ICT Manager of the Year, Most Improved Cyber Security and ICT Project of the Year.  Staff were inundated with training with a recent test spam email showing that a 96% response rate so it was becoming effective.

·       The Human Resources team – People, Performance and Culture had made great inroads with proactive talent acquisitions leading to fantastic candidates for vacant positions.

 

Discussion points raised

·       Congratulations to the Digital Services team for the awards they recently received.

·       Acknowledgement of the engagement team, who had been engaging with the community over the last four weeks with the Long Term Plan. 

 

Regulatory compliance

In response to questions

·       Acknowledgement of the emphasis being put on the backlog and to explain the difference between the normal consents and the backlog. 

·       Appreciation of the information on the Code of Compliances  It was requested that an accumulative effect of the housing in relation to what was needed and what was being produced be included in the report so that the size of the housing gap could be better understood.

 

City Development

Key points

·       Three city centre projects were on track for delivery prior to the end of the year, with Tunks Reserve, Elizabeth Street East street scaping and the Dive Crescent carpark.

·       90 Devonport Road was progressing with work commencing on the fifth floor and external façade and cultural elements being installed.

·       A recent City Partners Event held at the University of Waikato with 150 people in attendance had a lot of positive energy and support for the decisions Commissioners had made since their inception and the progress for that the team were making delivering the projects on time and on budget. 

 

In response to questions

·       The statistics of the car parking buildings highlighted that even at peak time there was still 20% available at Elizabeth Street and 40% at Spring Street.  The perception that there were no carparks needed to be changed and the availability constantly advertised. In November there were more carparks in the CBD than before the start of the year at start of year and another 360 would be coming on line in the near future.  Staff were working closely with Downtown Tauranga to come up with a campaign to roll out in the new year.  An activation programme was happening over the next five months with the wide variety of events happening which would give them a reason to come back into town. 

·       Further information would be provided on whether there were any holdups with the digging work which had started on Masonic Park which had found some archaeological evidence of what was previously on the site.

 

Discussion points raised

·       Acknowledged the wide range of funding support from a variety of community funding groups, many of who were noting that the relationship with Council had never been better.  The funders were happy to support great projects and were confident the funding was going to facilities that were widely used in the community.  

·       A recent article on the living seawall outlined the contribution from the Port of Tauranga and their involvement in some of the projects.

·       Impressed with the construction of the skatepark and the knowledge of those building it.

Resolution  CO23/23/13

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the "Executive Report".

Carried

 

11.10     Te Manawataki o Te Papa Ltd - Letter of Expectation for 2024-25

Staff             Gareth Wallis, General Manager: City Development & Partnerships

 

Discussion points raised

·       A change was requested on the fifth bullet point on page two of the letter – change the word precinct to projects to make sure more encompassing of all projects.

·       Add Baycourt refurbishment onto the list. 

 

 

 

Resolution  CO23/23/14

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Te Manawataki o Te Papa Ltd - Letter of Expectation for 2024-25".

(b)     Approves the Letter of Expectation from Tauranga City Council to Te Manawataki o Te Papa Ltd (Attachment 1) as amended above.

Carried

 

11.11     Meetings Schedule 2024

Staff             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance

Coral Hair, Manager: Democracy & Governance Services

 

Discussion points raised

·       A change was requested that the Bay of Plenty Regional Council Regional Public Transport Committee meeting for March 2024 be held after the Joint Public Transport Committee meeting.

Resolution  CO23/23/15

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Meetings Schedule 2024".

(b)     Adopts Attachment 1 as the meetings schedule for the period January to July 2024.

Carried

13        Public excluded session

Resolution to exclude the public

Resolution  CO23/23/16

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

13.8 – Tauriko West: Strategic Considerations for Tauriko West Enabling Works Procurement

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

Carried

 

At 12.33 pm the meeting adjourned.

At 1.04 pm the meeting reconvened.

11        Business   (continued)

11.12     Overview Report - Memorial Park Recreation Hub Programme

Staff             Marty Grenfell, Chief Executive

Mike Naude, Director of Civic Developments

 

External       Kim Wallace – Chairperson Te Manawataki o Te Papa Board

 

Tabled – three letters in support of Memorial Park Recreation Hub and Te Manawataki o Te Papa Board report 

 

Key points

·       The original proposal was for one venue for multiple facilities, but had now been separated into two proponents to provide the most effective way to deliver the services. Staff had narrowed the selection down and had identified the preference for the three options as outlined in the report.

·       Ms Wallace noted that the Te Manawataki o Te Papa Board scope of works had added Memorial Park in September 2023.  An extraordinary Board meeting was held on 5 December 2023 to consider the proposal.

·       The original proposal was $51M over budget and the Board supported the process undertaken to inform the options of retaining one facility incorporating both aquatic and indoor courts, or achieving the same level of service over two sites.

·       The Board noted that Bay Venues Limited supported the alternative options and community support had also been given on the various options provided.  The proposal was taking stakeholders along, engaging with the community and responding to their needs. 

·       Once Council make a decision, the design and cost estimates would be further refined as the design phases progressed.

·       Due to the identified key risks in relation to the new aquatic facility with the ground and geothermal conditions, the Board supports that early investigative work be undertaken to determine which option to go ahead with once the geothermal assumptions had been made.

·       The procurement strategy would also be reviewed in advance and the Board would further consider the contract form and risks and determine how to manage these.

·       Mana whenua consultation would be held on the alternative options as part of the design phase.

·       It was envisaged that the Board would be in a position to confirm the reasonableness of the key project assumptions and judgements in the first half of 2024, including the adequacy of funding, contingencies and critical risks to be managed.  Any changes to the cost would be managed in a reasonable way or considered through an approval process for the project.

·       The Board were keen to establish assurance gateways as they do with the Te Manawataki o Te Papa and civic development projects and would remain actively engaged and deliver with robust strategies. 

·       Letters of support had been received from the Aquatics user groups, Sport Bay of Plenty and Bay Venues Limited for Option 2 and Indoor group for an alternate location. 

 

In response to questions

·       A large part of the original cost was due to the foundation work required for the indoor courts, which made the proposal unaffordable.  The alternative was to split the aquatics and indoor courts across two sites with minimal disruption for training and to be able to relocate the new aquatic centre away from the high risk areas. 

·       Option B included one hydro slide although it would include the construction of the tower to allow two more to be retrofitted at a later date when the budget allowed.  Option C included three hydro slides

·       The business case notes that one hydro slide was sufficient but three would provide the best outcome.

 

Discussion points raised

·       The community were used to having the aquatic centre and courts in that location and they had been well used for a long time. 

·       The area was prone to flooding with stormwater flowing into the space at times, so flood modelling and hazard risks needed to be taken into account which would cost more.  The public need to understand the Council had to manage the risks and minimise them for the public which may include finding alternatives that were provided in a different way.

Resolution  CO23/23/17

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)        Receives the report "Overview Report - Memorial Park Recreation Hub Programme"; and that it lies on the table until after the public excluded items relating to this item had been discussed.

Carried

Attachments

1        Tabled - Aquatic Sport User Group - Council Memorial Park Submission Dec 2023

2        Tabled - Indoor Sport User Group - Letter of Support December 2023

3        Tabled - Te Manawataki o Te Papa Governance Board Chair report

 

11.13     Memorial Park Recreation Hub - Aquatics Options Report

 

Staff              Marty Grenfell, Chief Executive

Kelvin Eden, Capital Programme Manager: Major Community Amenity

Mike Naude, Director of Civic Developments 

Alison Law - Manager: Spaces & Places

 

External        Mark Bates – Project Architect, HDT Limited

Tina Harris, Bay Venues Limited

 

Key points

·       Acknowledgement of the wider consultant team, Bay Venues Limited, mana whenua and key stakeholders that multiple workshops had been held  to come up with the two aquatic centre options for consideration.

·       The scope had been refined and a relook made of the alternative options, resulting in the courts being relocated onto another site.

·       The aquatics centre was proposed on the same site due to its location, the availability of the geothermal water and the leisure focus of the wider park.

·       Stakeholder engagement was completed last week and letters of support have been tabled from Sport Bay of Plenty supporting option 2 for the aquatics, due to the sport focused aquatic areas and additional lanes. 

·       The mana whenua workshops held had resulted in the cultural narrative included in the report and while there was no agreement by them on the options, there was general support and appreciation of the smaller size of the building creating a lesser impact it had on the site. 

·       Mana whenua were interested in the geothermal water source and the sustainable use of the aquafer and the benefits of their communities having the hot water.  

·       One of the key drivers of the options in the report was the results of a feasibility study in 2020 which identified a real gap in the network in recreation and leisure water space.

·       Baywave was the only pool in the network that had deep water and the ability for structured water safe which was already at capacity.

·       Bay Venues Limited had identified that the Otumoetai pool would need to close in the next five years as it was reaching the end of its useful life.  This would create a further gap in the network. 

·       Option 2 caters for the gaps that would be created once the Otumoetai pool closes and meets the deficit in regards to recreation, leisure, deep water, structured water sports and would achieve the level of service with indoor and outdoor pools that could be used all year.  As it also catered for future growth it could be growth funded and have approximately $11M applied. 

·       If the gap created by the closing of Otumoetai was not covered with the new facility, either that pool would need to remain open at a cost of $10-20M capital cost over the next 10 years, plus operating costs or another aquatic centre would need to be built ready for that closure.

·       Option 3 does not allow for any future growth or address the need for deep water and structured sport, it did not cater for the Otumoetai pool closing and would not achieve Council’s desired levels of service.

 

In response to questions

·       In response to a question as to how much of the recreational use would be gained with option 2, it was noted that it catered really well for the recreation and leisure as well as the structured sport.  Option 3 would allow recreation and leisure, but at the detriment of structured sport.  

·       The Otumoetai pool was an old school pool which Council had taken over. The estimate of $10-20M was provided by Bay Venues Limited from their experience at running the facility and the cost to keep it running.  The pool was not in an ideal location and was an additional risk as it was at the top of a gully, meaning additional work may be required that was not factored into the capital cost.  It was considered that long term it was not worth keeping that pool open.

·       In response to the affordability of an additional $20M for option 2, it was noted that it would need to be included in the Long Term Plan 2024-34, but there would also be a need to future spend on another facility in the network.  The amount could be accommodated, but would put pressure on other projects. The upgrade of the Otumoetai pool was not currently included in the draft LTP.

·       Any development contributions would be debt funded until the growth occurred and was paid by that funding. The cost of capital would be absorbed in that and minimise the impact on any rates in the process.  The project was expected to be ratepayer and development contribution funded, although TECT had indicated that they were interested in funding a portion of it, but could not approach them until a definitive plan had been completed. 

·       In relation to the likelihood of the additional two hydro slides being included at a later date, it was noted that an additional $2.4M would be required to include them at this stage.

·       The difference of the cost of the hydro slide tower in the three options, the platform height of 12.5m was kept the same across each of the options, however a rationalisation of option 3 sees subtle differences to the configuration of the slide, the space around it and the run off shute and was the tightest allowance to accommodate three slides within the $4.37M budget.

·       In answer to a question as to why development funding of $11M would not be available with option 3 it was noted that it did not allow for growth so could only be rate funded.  Option 2 provided additional capacity and network through the deep water indoor lanes and the outdoor pool being open all year round meant that it was catering for future growth., Option 2 allowed the deep water sports to grow as Baywave was at capacity and unable to accommodate any more.  There was more water space in option 2 that would allow much more flexibility for recreation and leisure fun time in the weekends and school holidays.  

·       The cost difference between options 2 and 3 was $10.45M.

·       The geothermal heating was designed around keeping the outdoor pool and both options open all year with a slight rise of temperature in the winter months as lane swimmers preferred the water to be cooler for the longer swims.

·       In response to a concern that the structured sports would take over more of the recreational and leisure time for the pool, in this case, there was more flexibility with the deep water, the outdoor and indoor pools, but it would still be down to management and ensuring the bookings were fair use and prioritised at the right times. 

·       In relation to installing the three hydro slides now or later, it was noted that installing two more in five years would give a boost and reimage of the facility, but as there was the risk of not being able to afford do them later, it would be good to have them all installed at the start.  

·       The escalation of costs was the difference between what it would cost today and the cost when it would be completed.  The contingency was to cover any items that may have been missed around the design process or additional work on the geotechnical investigation and project contingency to accommodate any changes in the design as work was proceeding. There was 26.5% contingency escalation, which was right for this stage of the project and as go through design process these will be refined and expected at time of build these factors would be better known.

·       Tina Harris from Bay Venues Limited reiterated that the network was over capacity at Baywave, that structured sport was growing and the lap spaces were also full.  The Otumoetai pool was a 1.2-1.4m depth pool which was not meeting the needs of structured sport with the biggest growth in water polo, synchronised swimming.  She agreed that Option 2 would meet the needs of structured sport, leisure and recreation and provide flexibility with the outdoor pool at 1.4m deep would be a good lap pool for children, adults and capable younger people and enable them all to utilise it well. 

·       The biggest user of the Otumoetai pool was the Evolution Swimming Club who along with Otumoetai College had endorsed option 2 as the preferred option. The general population at Otumoetai only made up 14% of 50,000 visits to the pool and was only meeting the needs of the general community not the wider community.  In comparison the Greerton pool had 92,000 visits per year. 

 

Discussion points raised

·       Preference was for option 2 with three hydro slides at a total cost of $122.25M which would be the absolute maximum amount for the project to be kept within.

·       Signal that with the selection of option 2 that Council would close the Otumoetai pool when it reached the end of its useful life in 4-5 years.

·       It was requested that discussions be held with funding partners to assit with funding the facility.

Resolution  CO23/23/18

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Memorial Park Recreation Hub - Aquatics Options Report".

(b)     Approves aquatic centre Option 2 of the attached Memorial Park Recreation Hub & Spatial Plan document at a total cost of $122.25M to include three hydro slides, to progress to preliminary design including a revised costs estimate;

(c)     Seeks a further report on completion of the preliminary designs and cost estimates that will include an update on findings from preconstruction investigations.

Carried

Resolution  CO23/23/19

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Option 2 was selected, based on the decommissioning of the Otumoetai pool.

(b)     That staff provide a report on the cost of the demolition of the Otumoetai pool and future utilisation of the site. 

Carried

 

At 1.58pm the meeting adjourned.

At 3.04pm the meeting reconvened.

 

11.14     Approval of Memorial Park Site Development Plan

Staff             Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Community Services

Alison Law, Manager: Spaces & Places

Amanda Davies, Manager: Spaces and Places Project Outcomes

 

Key points

·       Spatial plan worked alongside this with the delivery team and aquatic centre team to ensure that Memorial Park continues to be a high profile park in the community.

·       The focus was on the $6M upgrade to go alongside the upgrade, especially around the shared pathways and connections throughout the park and out to the adjacent roads.

·       Consideration was being given to how to upgrade the existing play area so that it was complimentary to what was occurring on the water front and to ensure the open areas were looked after and improved with amenities such as barbeques, toilets, seating and appropriate carparking.

·       The upgrade enabled actions from Asset and Investment plan, the reserves management action plan so that it would remain a high profile park.

 

In response to questions

·       In relation to a concern at potential problems with the ground conditions for the pathways resulting in possible increased cost, it was noted that potentially this could occur, but anything that was done now should not prevent something happening in future.  As the detailed design was undertaken for each space, staff would ensure that what was proposed was appropriate for the space.  There was some work to be done around the rowing club and carpark to ensure they were accommodated.  The Long Term Plan would enable it to happen and be dependent on what was appropriate at the time.

·       Jordon field and Memorial field were generally used as passive open spaces and events so it was important that they were retained given the intensification taking place in the peninsula. There was a programme of tree planting that sat alongside the plans, especially around the access routes. 

·       It was noted that while mana whenua had put a lot of time into the history of the area, there was also a lot of colonial era history that needed to be included in layer recognised.  The area around the fountain would be formalised as a relaxation garden area, providing more formality around the WWII memorials and ensuring the heritage play that was important to Tauranga remained. 

·       In relation to making the areas more accessible to all parts of community, accessibility and inclusion was something that the staff were really passionate about and was in the forefront of planning and design. They keen to connect with other local authorities and different people who have particular needs, noting that if they could get it right for special requirements, it would be right for everyone.

·       The carparking included in the $6M budget was relative to the park not the aquatic centre.

·       The $6M budget included the new shared path connections including points of entry at Devenport Road and 11th Avenue, upgrading the existing play area including a new wetland play zone, incorporating the rocket and nature play trail, general improvements to the open space area, lawn space, seating, picnic area and all weather are, new youth play, centralising the carparking, access to the rowing club and tree and amenity planting areas.

·       The balance of the areas outside of that were not presently included in the Long Term Plan. As the wider plan was new, it would be included in the next iteration of the Long Term Plan and would more detail and costing and include the next stages following this work.  

 

Discussion points raised

·       Commissioners supported the proposal which catered for amenities including access to the waterfront, shade, open green space for events, sports, and provision of adequate car parking. The area was well used and the focus was on the right elements for the current budget of $6M.  

Resolution  CO23/23/20

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Approval of Memorial Park Site Development Plan";

(b)     Endorses the long-term spatial plan for Memorial Park; and

(c)     Approves upgrades to Memorial Park at a cost of $6 million, in line with the spatial plan.

Carried

 

12        Discussion of late items

Nil

13        Public excluded session   (continued)

Resolution to exclude the public

Recommendations – stephen Bill – carried

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

13.1 - Public Excluded minutes of the Council meeting held on 27 November 2023

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information, or information from the same source, and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.2 - Strategic Property Purchase for Memorial Park Recreation Hub Project

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.3 - Indoor Court Provision - Concept Design & Cost Estimate and Exemption to Open Competition

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.4 - Memorial Park Aquatic Centre - Procurement Strategy

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.5 - Tauranga Art Gallery land purchase and capital project update

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.6 - Progression of Procurement for Cameron Road Stage 2

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.7 - Transport Major Projects Governance and Oversight Arrangements

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.8 – Tauriko West: Strategic Considerations for Tauriko West Enabling Works Procurement

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.9 – Te Tumu Urban Growth Area

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

and s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.8 - Sale of Smiths Farm - Selection of Preferred Purchaser/Developer

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.11 - Exemption from Open Competition - New Inlet Works Mechanical Plant Procurement

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.12 - Exemption to Open Competition - Prefabricated Public Convenience Block

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.13 - Direct Appointment under Exemption - Biofilter Replacement

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.14 - Waterfront Projects Funding - Request for Budget Adjustments

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.15 - Te Manawataki o Te Papa Infrastructure Funding and Financing Levy

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

 

 

11        Business   (continued)

11.12     Overview Report - Memorial Park Recreation Hub Programme   (continued)

 

Key points

·       Remove for active reserves from resolution (d) to allow staff to change all the budgets throughout the Long Term Plan deliberations including the development contributions policy to reflect changes in growth.

·       The cost of two hydro slides were also included in (b) taking the total from $150.85M to $153.25M and the first bullet point increases from $119.85M to $122.25M.

Resolution  CO23/23/21

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(b)        Approves option B as outlined in this report, at a total programme cost of $153.25M, to include:

       An aquatics centre with leisure, toddler, programme, bombing pools, splash pad, eight indoor lanes and two outdoor lanes (option 2) and three hydro slides at a cost of $122.25M.

       Indoor courts at an alternative city-centre location with 4 courts at a cost of $25M.

       Upgrades to the Memorial Park to enhance parking, access, recreation facilities for young people and spaces for community gatherings at a cost of $6M.

(c)        Notes that funding is available within the current Long-term Plan 2021-31 budgets to accommodate option b of this report; and

(d)        Notes that any adjustments to future funding requirements will be addressed through the Executive Report to the Long-term Plan 2024-34 deliberations.

Carried

 

14        Appreciation and closing karakia

Commissioner Tolley noted that it had been a massive year and thanked everyone for the work done which had resulted in a huge step forward for the city, and would like the opportunity to make that point to staff at the upcoming Te Waka Taumata o Tauranga prizegiving function noting that the organisation was in a much different position from when the Commissioners came in February 2021. Staff were winning awards for a diverse range of activities, the confidence and capability of staff is overwhelming to culminate in years of work to make decisions and get on with it was an achievement. Appreciation particularly to the Executive who had worked so hard to bring it all to fruition. 

 

Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston closed the meeting with a karakia.

 

The meeting closed at 5.49 pm.

 

 

 

The minutes of this meeting were confirmed as a true and correct record at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 12 February 2024.

 

 

 

........................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest

9          Deputations, presentations, petitions

Nil

10        Recommendations from other committees

Nil


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11        Business

11.1       Council-Controlled Organisations' Draft Statements of Intent 2024-27

File Number:           A15398982

Author:                    Sanjana France, CCO Specialist

Authoriser:              Gareth Wallis, General Manager: City Development & Partnerships

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       The purpose of this report is to provide shareholder feedback on the draft Statements of Intent for five of Tauranga City Council’s seven council-controlled organisations.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Council-Controlled Organisations' Draft Statements of Intent 2024-27".

(b)     Receives the draft Statements of Intent for Bay Venues Limited, Tauranga Art Gallery Trust, Tourism Bay of Plenty, Te Manawataki o Te Papa Limited, and Te Manawataki o Te Papa Charitable Trust for 2024/25 to 2026/27.

(c)     Notes that as joint shareholder of Tourism Bay of Plenty, Western Bay of Plenty District Council will be asked to approve their separate shareholder comments on the draft Statement of Intent for Tourism Bay of Plenty at their 22 February 2024 Council meeting.

(d)     Notes that these five draft Statements of Intent have been delivered ahead of the usual Local Government Act (2002) deadline, but that Bay of Plenty Local Authority Shared Services Limited and Local Government Funding Agency will provide their drafts as per the usual timeframes.

 

Executive Summary

2.       Bay Venues Limited (Bay Venues), Tauranga Art Gallery Trust (TAGT), Tourism Bay of Plenty (TBOP), Te Manawataki o Te Papa Limited (TMOTPL), and Te Manawataki o Te Papa Charitable Trust (Charitable Trust) are five of Tauranga City Council’s (TCC) seven council-controlled organisations. They are required to by the Local Government Act (2002) to prepare a draft Statement of Intent to cover the next three financial years, and provide a copy to their shareholder by 1 March each year.

3.       In consideration of the upcoming local government elections in July 2024, the timeframes have been brought forward for the Statements of Intent 2024-25 to 2026-27. Council requested the drafts were provided by 19 January 2024 and the final versions by 30 April 2024, rather than the standard legislative timeframes of 1 March and 30 June respectively.

4.       The five Statements of Intent have met the statutory requirements as outlined in Schedule 8, section 9 of the Local Government Act.

5.       Council has an opportunity to comment on the draft Statements of Intent before they are finalised by the council-controlled organisations. Shareholder comments will be provided for the organisations to consider when writing their final Statements of Intent.

6.       There have been several discussions in relation to the draft Statements of Intent with staff from various teams at TCC, and they have been discussed with the Commissioners. This report includes the combined feedback and suggested amendments.

7.       The draft Statements of Intent (Attachments 1 to 5) have been assessed against the Letters of Expectation for council-controlled organisations for 2024/25, available on our website.

8.       Bay of Plenty Local Authority Shared Services Limited (BOPLASS), and Local Government Funding Agency (LGFA) are also council-controlled organisations. They provide opportunities for local authorities to access improved levels of service, reduced costs, joint procurement, and funding.

9.       BOPLASS and LGFA are also required by the Local Government Act (2002) to provide draft Statements of Intent to cover the next three financial years to their shareholders by 1 March each year. As TCC is one of several shareholder members of BOPLASS and LGFA, it is not expected that we provide them with Letters of Expectation, nor do we provide feedback to their draft Statements of Intent. Therefore, their drafts are not included in this report and will be presented separately to Council in due course.

Background

General comments

10.     The chairs and executive of the respective council-controlled organisations have maintained regular communication with Council’s Commissioners, executive and staff. This regular engagement (formal and informal) has provided opportunities to embed the ethos of collaboration and partnership, along with the shareholder’s desire for improved community outcomes.

11.     The four substantive council-controlled organisations (Bay Venues, TAGT, TBOP and TMOTPL) have all referred to Council’s community outcomes in their Statements of Intent, and have demonstrated how they intend to work with TCC’s various departments to achieve those outcomes.

12.     Board members, executive and staff of the council-controlled organisations have embraced the opportunity to participate in the training opportunities provided by TCC, including the Te Kete-ā-Rohe course. This has provided a greater understanding of Tauranga Moana, local iwi and hāpu connections, and the high-value that TCC places on its relationships.  

13.     As outlined in the Letters of Expectation, the Commissioners are keen to see how each organisation will respond to applying a more transparent and publicly accountable approach through the board workings and the wider organisations.

14.     The Commission are also keen to see increased storytelling, taking the community on the journey of the council-controlled organisations, their relationship to TCC, and the key projects and outcomes they are delivering.

15.     The council-controlled organisations are also encouraged to highlight their relationship to TCC by proactively seizing opportunities for co-branding signage and communications.

16.     TCC’s Takawaenga unit continues to work with the council-controlled organisations across various work programmes, including supporting Mana Whenua board representation, which Bay Venues, TAGT and TBOP now have in place. They will continue to offer opportunities and training sessions to upskill internal capability and deepen the knowledge of tikanga within the organisations.

Bay Venues Limited (Bay Venues)

17.     Overall, the Bay Venues’ Draft Statement of Intent (Attachment 1) shows alignment with our Letter of Expectation, with an emphasis on community, collaboration, and partnership. It also shows commitment to achieving Council’s outcomes for the wider community and people’s wellbeing in Tauranga Moana, through the use of its facilities.

18.     Bay Venues’ important partnership position in several Council plans and projects is highlighted in their Statement of Intent. This includes their role in the Baypark Master Plan, and in the new Memorial Park aquatic facility as they are seen as key opportunities to benefit the community and grow their organisation.

19.     The document provides explicit references to community benefits, including:

·     The organisation’s primary goal.

·     Support of diversity and inclusion initiatives.

·     Being the Council’s strategic delivery partner for community facilities.

20.     Suggested amendments:

·     Consider greater emphasis on community engagement to ensure facilities are truly inclusive and accessible.

·     Take more explicit ownership of diversity initiatives and the funding of them as business-as-usual activities.

·     Include a commitment to being inclusive across multiple ethnic groups, in addition to biculturalism, to reflect the increasingly diverse demographics in Tauranga.

·     Highlight the early collaboration and engagement opportunities with TCC on key projects, and the intention to establish clarity around both organisations’ roles from the outset.

·     Include proactive media liaison and engage the community through good news stories.

·     Consider adopting an Accessibility Plan and implementing accessibility audits across the full network of facilities.

·     More explicitly highlight co-branding initiatives and the intention to replace old signage over time, with new signs that include TCC branding.

·     Staff commend Bay Venues’ commitment to diversity initiatives and references in their document to their role in TCC’s Action and Investment Plans.

·     Following recent GOVN365 board reviews, we encourage Bay Venues to proactively implement actions recommended through this process and reference them in their final Statement of Intent.

Tauranga Art Gallery Trust (TAGT)

21.     Overall TAGT’s Statement of Intent (Attachment 2) is well presented and shows alignment with our Letter of Expectation, particularly in outlining their approach to financial prudence.

22.     TAGT are an integral part of the Civic Precinct development, and their document highlights their commitment and key partnership role in Te Manawataki o Te Papa.

23.     TAGT have clearly linked each of their strategic objectives and measures with TCC’s community outcomes.

24.     Suggested amendments:

·     Review the trustee fees and budgets in relation to inflationary rates year-on-year as there appears to be some accuracy errors in these figures.

·     Check that their budgets reflect the upcoming disruption to their operations while their Gallery is being revamped as part of Te Manawataki o Te Papa.

·     Ensure the investments from TCC are accurately reflected in their forecasting tables.

·     Correct the spelling of Te Arawa on page 9.

·     Consider moving the measure around brand value, touring exhibitions, and media coverage to the ‘be an anchor of enduring success’ strategic objective.

·     Include joint story telling with TCC and note that TAGT will publish more information online, including summaries of board meeting minutes. We acknowledge redacting commercially sensitive information is an option where necessary.

·     Discuss the Social Return on Investment work, commit to reporting back on how this research will be incorporated into the Gallery’s community offerings, and demonstrate how this will inform future performance measures. 

·     Highlight how the Gallery’s offerings will celebrate the wider diversity of the region and embrace opportunities to connect with a range of ethnic communities.

·     Following recent GOVN265 board reviews, we encourage TAGT to proactively implement actions recommended through this process and reference them in their final Statement of Intent.

·     More explicitly discuss how TAGT will achieve accessibility for all users, including its staff, artists and visitors.

Tourism Bay of Plenty (TBOP)

25.     TBOP’s draft Statement of Intent (Attachment 3), is well presented, refers to TCC’s community outcomes and others matters outlined in this year’s Letter of Expectations.  

26.     Overall, the document demonstrates TBOP have been very responsive to TCC’s feedback. It notes their key role in projects like the Tauranga Moana City Brand, which will further enhance alignment opportunities with TCC and other council-controlled organisations.

27.     Suggested amendments:

·    Explain how TBOP will explore the making the Flavours of Plenty festival a separate structure or entity and how this transition might work, noting the significant staff resources required to run the festival.

·    Elaborate on TBOP’s role in the Omanawa Falls project, including initiatives to improve the wayfinding and further promote this cultural and sustainability success story.

·    Discuss TBOP’s diversity initiatives, particularly how they will embrace leadership opportunities in this space. For example, with the Native Nations project, collaborating with TCC’s Takawaenga unit and celebrating other diverse and indigenous cultures.

·    Consider expanding the reach of TBOP’s research and engagement into residents’ satisfaction, and the local tourism industry’s social licence to operate. We suggest TBOP considers using the Vital Updates research channels which connect with approximately 6,000 people.

·    Include more intentional actions in the accessible tourism space. To enhance inclusivity, we suggest TBOP look at outreach with communities that aren’t traditonally able to participate in their tourism offerings.

·    Elevate cultural offerings across the city, which showcase Tauranga’s increasing cultural diversity.

·    Include joint story telling with TCC and note that TBOP will publish more information online, including summaries of board meeting minutes. We acknowledge redacting commercially sensitive information is an option where necessary.

·    Staff commend the incorporation of TCC’s Action and Investment Plans where relevant.

·    Following recent GOVN365 board reviews, we encourage TBOP to proactively implement actions recommended through this process and reference them in their final Statement of Intent.

Te Manawataki o Te Papa Limited (TMOTPL)

28.     Overall, TMOTPL’s Statement of Intent (Attachment 4) is well presented and aligned with our Letter of Expectation.

29.     The document highlights the array of critical projects TMOTPL is and will be responsible for delivering, as part of its significant role governing the civic precinct development.

30.     Suggested amendments:

·     Provide more clarity on when TMOTPL assumes responsibility for delivering projects, for example, acknowledging approval at Council meetings as the starting point.

·     Mention Governance to Governance forums more explicitly as a key opportunity to foster collaborative and transparent relationships with Council.

·     Tweak the wording in Section 15, Full-year reporting, to say the “final annual report will be made available to the public once audited.”

·     Amend the wording in Section 20, Financial performance, to say “TCC to raise at least $151.5 million from external sources.”

·     Consider directly referencing TCC’s Social Procurement policy in the Section 7 Source Local performance measure.

Te Manawataki o Te Papa Charitable Trust (Charitable Trust)

31.     The Charitable Trust was not provided with a Letter of Expectation as their intentions and direction as a joint land ownership council-controlled organisation, in partnership with the Otamataha Trust, remain very similar to the previous inaugural year.

32.     We encourage the role of multiple cultural advisors or liaisons between mana whenua and the Charitable Board to be explored.

33.     We note the Charitable Trust’s important role in supporting and encouraging the development of a vibrant civic precinct.

Strategic / Statutory Context

34.     The Statement of Intent is one of the council-controlled organisation’s key governance and planning documents. Engaging with the council-controlled organisations throughout the development of the annual Statements of Intent is one of the main ways Council can influence its council-controlled organisations, while ensuring they are aligned with Council’s strategic outcomes.

Options Analysis

Option 1: Receive the draft Statements of Intent and approve the feedback to be provided to the council-controlled organisations – RECOMMENDED

35.     Receive the draft Statements of Intent from Bay Venues, TAGT, TBOP, TMOTPL and the Charitable Trust. Agree with the suggested shareholder comments outlined in this report, noting that Western Bay of Plenty District Council will confirm shareholder feedback to TBOP at their 22 February 2024 Council meeting.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·    The council-controlled organisations will receive useful information to ensure their final Statements of Intent meet Council’s expectations.

·    Council meets its legislative requirements under the Local Government Act by formally receiving the draft Statements of Intent and providing feedback within the required timeframe.

·    Final Statements of Intent are aligned with Council’s strategic direction.

·    None

Option 2: Receive the draft Statements of Intent and do not approve the feedback to be provided to the council-controlled organisations – NOT RECOMMENDED 

36.     Receive draft Statements of Intent from Bay Venues, TAGT, TBOP, TMOTPL and the Charitable Trust. Do not agree with the suggested shareholder comments outlined in this report, noting that Western Bay of Plenty District Council will confirm shareholder feedback to TBOP at their 22 February 2024 Council meeting.  


 

Advantages

Disadvantages

·    Council meets its legislative requirements under the Local Government Act by formally receiving the draft Statements of Intent and deciding not to provide feedback within the required timeframe.

·    The council-controlled organisations do not receive any useful information on Council’s expectations about the content of their final Statements of Intent.

·    The final Statements of Intent may contain inaccurate information or be misaligned with Council’s strategic direction.

Financial Considerations

37.     Budgets for all council-controlled organisations, including Council’s contributions, are included in the draft Statements of Intent.

Legal Implications / Risks

38.     If Council does not approve the provision of the suggested feedback to the council-controlled organisations, the final Statements of Intent may not be consistent with Council’s strategic direction and may contain inaccuracies (financial and governance risk).

Consultation / Engagement

39.     It is not required or expected to consult on a Statement of Intent under the Local Government Act.

Significance

40.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

41.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region;

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the matter; and

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

42.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the matter is of medium significance.

ENGAGEMENT

43.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the matter is of medium significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

          Click here to view the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy

Next Steps

44.     A copy of this report and the resolutions will be provided to each council-controlled organisation by 16 February 2024. Western Bay of Plenty District Council will also provide feedback to Tourism Bay of Plenty following their Council meeting on 22 February 2024. 

45.     Any feedback provided in this report should be given consideration by the council-controlled organisation boards when producing their final Statements of Intent.

46.     The final Statements of Intent for Bay Venues, TAGT, TBOP, TMOTPL and the Charitable Trust are to be delivered to Council by 30 April 2024. Staff will review the final Statements of Intent and present a report to Council for approval in May 2024.

47.     BOPLASS and LGFA will provide their draft and final Statements of Intent per the usual Local Government Act timeframes, which are due on 1 March and 30 June respectively.

Attachments

1.       Bay Venues DRAFT Statement of Intent 2024-27 - A15478231 (Separate Attachments 1)  

2.       TAGT DRAFT Statement of Intent 2024-27 - A15449692 (Separate Attachments 1)  

3.       TBOP DRAFT  Statement of Intent 2024-27 - A15449702 (Separate Attachments 1)  

4.       TMOTPL DRAFT Statement of Intent 2024-27 - A15478609 (Separate Attachments 1)  

5.       TMOTP Charitable Trust DRAFT Statement of Intent 2024-27 - A15436131 (Separate Attachments 1)   

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.2       Board review of council-controlled organisations

File Number:           A15320412

Author:                    Sanjana France, CCO Specialist

Authoriser:              Gareth Wallis, General Manager: City Development & Partnerships

 

Purpose of the Report

1.     To provide copies of board performance review summary reports for our three substantive council-controlled organisations, Bay Venues Limited (Bay Venues), Tauranga Art Gallery Trust (TAGT), and Tourism Bay of Plenty (TBOP). This is consistent with the requirements of their Enduring Statement of Expectations.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Board review of council-controlled organisations".

(b)     Receives the Bay Venues board review summary document.

(c)     Receives the TAGT board review summary document.

(d)     Receives the TBOP board review summary document.

 

Executive Summary

2.     The Enduring Statement of Expectations for Tauranga City Council’s (TCC) council-controlled organisations requires that a board performance review be undertaken every two years, alternating between board-led and Council-led.

3.     Council-led reviews of TCC’s substantive council-controlled organisations, Bay Venues, TAGT and TBOP, were undertaken between October and December 2023 by GOVN365.Three summary reports are provided as Attachments 1 to 3.

4.     The performance reviews demonstrate that the three organisations have common themes across the range of ten performance measures that they were evaluated against.

5.     The reviews also highlighted that TCC’s three substantive council-controlled organisations are either “performing” or “flourishing” in terms of GOVN365’s Governance Maturity Roadmap, which the reviewers have indicated is to be commended. Further, two out of three of our council-controlled organisations had higher maturity scores than any other organisations reviewed by GOVN365 to date.

6.     In addition, no governance deficiencies were identified in any of the council-controlled organisations that would inhibit them to carry out their duties. Several recommendations for actions/improvements over the next year were provided to the boards, who have agreed to make them a priority in the coming months.

Background

7.     The council-controlled organisations’ Enduring Statement of Expectations states that a board performance review will be undertaken every two years, alternating between a board-led review and a Council-led one.

8.     Section 11.5 of the Enduring Statement of Expectations states:

Council expects CCOs to follow the board performance review framework below, which requires that reviews:

·    are held on a biennial basis, alternating between a board-led review and a council-led review, with monitoring of agreed performance improvement initiatives

·    are undertaken by an independent, external reviewer, and are based on a methodology that includes qualitative, quantitative, and observational approaches

·    include relevant assessment criteria that relate to the board’s governance role, practices, and responsibilities, including strategy, risk and compliance, performance, and board culture

·    assess the board as a whole, individual board members, and the chair of the board

·    seek feedback from senior management as well as individual board members

·    provide a report to the CCO board summarising findings and suggesting areas for improvement

·    provide Council with a high-level report addressing key themes and areas of focus for improvement.

9.     Council-led reviews were completed between October and December 2023 by Gerry Lynch, the Chief Executive of GOVN365, which is a board governance software package designed to simplify governance and improve performance. The summary reports are provided as Attachments 1 to 3.

10.  GOVN365’s review process entails three stages:

·    Evaluation – where board members complete the board and organisational evaluation over a two-hour session.

·    Prioritisation – where board members use the evaluation insights to set 2-3 priority areas and assign tasks to the team.

·    Improve – where assigned tasks are completed to lift governance maturity and improve performance.   

11.  With the three organisations using a different reviewer and methodology from their previous reviews in 2021 and 2017, and from Council’s last review in 2019, the ability to make clear comparisons between previous reviews is difficult. This is something that will be taken into consideration for future reviews, with the intention that we continue to use the same reviewer going forward, so that effective benchmarking can take place. 

12.  GOVN365’s methodology separates business operations into ten critical areas and evaluates how well a board and organisation are performing within each one through a series of multi-choice questions. The GOVN365 consultant supported the boards through this process ensuring everyone was heard, group think was avoided, and answers were unbiased. 

13.  The three organisations all scored promisingly, within the 59-79% scoring ranges, which equates to ‘Flourishing’ or ‘Performing’ in GOVN365’s Governance Maturity Roadmap. This Roadmap is included as Attachment 4.

14.  In addition, GOVN365 said that two out of three of our council-controlled organisations had higher maturity scores than any other organisations that they have reviewed to date.

15.  Themes from across the three council-controlled organisations are highlighted below and more detail can be found within the reports in Attachments 1 to 3. 

·   Strategy oversight – the three council-controlled organisations had mostly lag measures, which focus on the past, that are reviewed when monitoring strategy. In most cases there is an opportunity to reduce the number of key measures tracked, and to ensure there are some lead measures that are more likely than lag measures, to predict where the organisation is heading.

·   Enterprise risk management – linking enterprise risks with strategy, identifying key factors that could derail the strategy, then looking at upside risks to expedite strategic plans were recommended to the boards. GOVN365 also noted that building a proactive risk culture and risk management process were areas for general improvement.

 

·   Digital and information technology – there are opportunities in this area to build in some learning and development for the boards in developing technology areas to stay abreast of opportunities, understanding cyber and other IT related risks, and developing digital roadmaps for the future.

·   Stakeholders – there could be wider consideration of the varying needs of different stakeholders, when to involve them in strategy formulation, and how to seek meaningful feedback. This could enable some different discussions at the governance group level. A mapping exercise would be useful in this area, mapping the key relationships and identifying what ‘excellence’ looks like.

·   Governance capability – to ensure the governance groups have the appropriate capability and diversity to achieve their responsibilities, capability matrixes should be developed to ensure the organisations are aware of the capability/experience needed on their boards. These matrixes should be reviewed when vacancies arise, and clear succession plans should be developed and communicated to Council.

·   Formalising processes – this varied across the three organisations but across the group, there were several areas where only informal processes in place. This works whilst the existing management teams and governance groups are in place, but if there were multiple changes, it could put the organisations at risk. Therefore, it would be worth understanding which areas are the most important to formalise, to reduce future risk for the organisations.

·   Shared services – there were discussions with all three organisations regarding the alignment and accountability of the expectations and delivery of the shared service function. Information gaps from shared services were identified as creating gaps in the information and insights that the governance group need to make better long-term decisions.

·   Shared insights across council-controlled organisations – it would be useful to share learnings and opportunities across these organisations, so that strengths could be shared, and potentially CCOs with a strength could help a CCO with a development opportunity.

          Priority actions for Bay Venues

16.  Two key actions were highlighted as priorities for Bay Venues; (1) a stakeholder engagement mapping and plan, which would include all key stakeholders, mutual value, how they connect and how often, and how they would measure progress; (2) a commercial value plan, which identifies the key commercial opportunities, what, when and how, alongside their core values. 

          Priority actions for TAGT

17.  Three top priorities were identified for TAGT over the next year; (1) review their longer-term operating model at their strategy day in March; (2) communicate clear expectations of the shared services function with KPIs and qualitative measures, and report formally against this monthly; and (3) identify if there are opportunities to leverage other people in other council-controlled organisations to help with their strategy or finance work.

          Priority actions for TBOP

18.  Digital and IT risk was a clear priority for TBOP. Cyber risks were noted as an area of vulnerability and one that the board agreed as important to assess, with support from Council, to ensure any risks are mitigated.

19.  Council staff are satisfied that the council-controlled organisations’ 2023 board performance reviews demonstrate that the boards are performing well, overall working to their strengths, and identifying challenges.

20.  The boards each have their priorities and next steps to work on, and have been offered the support of quarterly coaching sessions with GOVN365 to help them stay on track.


 

Strategic / Statutory Context

21.  The board performance review is required by council-controlled organisations’ Enduring Statement of Expectations and assists Council in its governance responsibilities. This is consistent with the requirements other councils have of their council-controlled organisations.

Options Analysis

22.  There are no options as Council is only receiving the 2023 Board Performance Reviews.

Financial Considerations

23.  The Enduring Statement of Expectations states that a board performance review will be undertaken every two years, alternating between a board-led review and a Council-led one. Council has paid for this round of reviews from its council-controlled organisation annual budget, as the council-controlled organisations paid for the previous reviews in 2021.

Legal Implications / Risks

24.  There are no legal implications or risks associated with this review.

Significance

25.  The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

26.  In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)        the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region;

(b)        any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the matter; and

(c)        the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

27.  In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the matter is of low significance.

ENGAGEMENT

28.  Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the matter is of low significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

          Click here to view the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy

Next Steps

29.  Staff will inform the boards of Council’s consideration of this report.

30.  Staff will support the boards to complete the prioritised actions.

31.  GOVN365 have offered to provide support to help boards keep on track with actions identified in the reviews, through quarterly meetings with the Chairs over the next year.

32.  The council-controlled organisation boards and Council can use the biennial Governance to Governance forums to discuss progress and priority actions, and provide development opportunities for its council-controlled organisations.

Attachments

1.       GOVN365 Report - Bay Venues Ltd Board Review - December 2023 - A15464415

2.       GOVN365 Report - Tauranga Art Gallery Trust Board Review - December 2023 - A15464403

3.       GOVN365 Report - Tourism BOP Board Review - December 2023 - A15464413

4.       GOVN365 - Governance Maturity Roadmap - A15464418  


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 






Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 






Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 







Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 



Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.3       Plan Change 34 Belk Road Rural Residential

File Number:           A15300859

Author:                    Phillip Martelli, Principal Planner: Structure Planning

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to approve Plan Change 34 Belk Road Rural Residential for public notification.

 

Recommendations

That Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Plan Change 34 Belk Road Rural Residential".

(b)     Approves Plan Change 34 Belk Road Rural Residential for public notification.

(c)     Authorises the General Manager: Strategy, Growth and Governance to arrange the public notification process in accordance with the provisions of the First Schedule to the Resource Management Act 1991.

(d)     Delegates authority to the General Manager: Strategy, Growth and Governance to approve any minor and technical changes to the proposed City Plan map and text amendments contained in Attachment 1, as necessary, prior to public notification.

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       The land subject to the Plan Change is part of the 2021 Local Government boundary change between Western Bay of Plenty District and Tauranga City. It is a small discrete area between the proposed Tauriko Business Estate extension and the proposed Tauriko West urban growth area. The land use is predominantly lifestyle, and this Plan Change reflects that. The proposed changes to the City Plan are contained in Attachment 1 and 2.

Background

3.       The Plan Change is the consequence of a jurisdictional boundary adjustment between Western Bay of Plenty District Council and Tauranga City Council. Part of the Local Government Commission decision was that the land, currently zoned Rural under the Western Bay of Plenty District Plan, was to be incorporated into the Tauranga City Plan by April 2024.

4.       The Resource Management Act section 32 (s32) requires a detailed assessment to establish whether the proposed plan change content is the most appropriate course of action.  The assessment for Plan Change 34 is included as Attachment 3. The s32 report looks at a range of options and concludes that the Rural Residential Zone is the most appropriate as it recognises the current uses of the land, and that the land is not suitable for residential or industrial development.

Strategic / Statutory Context

5.       The Plan Change gives effect to the Local Government Commission decision in approving the jurisdictional boundary adjustment.

 

Options Analysis

6.       As a consequence of the Local Government decision, Council is legally required to notify a plan change - the status quo of doing nothing is not an option.

7.       The options for the Plan Change are fully covered in the s32 report in Attachment 3.

Financial Considerations

8.       There are no financial considerations associated with this report. The cost associated with the preparation of proposed Plan Change 34 is within existing LTP budgets.

Legal Implications / Risks

9.       The Plan Change recognises the existing uses of the land. The landowners have been consulted with and are generally supportive of the proposal. The legal risk is considered to be low.

Consultation / Engagement

10.     Plan changes are required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to be publicly notified for submissions and further submissions. This is in addition to the engagement process that has already occurred as part of the development of proposed Plan Change 34 and as set out in the attached s32 report. Through the preparation of the plan change landowner meetings have been held as well as one on one contact with some.

11.     Consultation with the relevant hapu and iwi have been undertaken. This is documented in the s32 report attached.

Significance

12.     Under the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy this decision is of low significance for the following reasons:

·    The Plan Change has limited geographic coverage.

·    Apart from the 13 affected landowners, the plan change will have limited public interest.

·    The amendments do not change the existing use of the land.

ENGAGEMENT

13.     Proposed Plan Change 34 is required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to be publicly notified for submissions and further submissions.

Next Steps

14.     The finalised proposed Plan Change and the accompanying s32 analysis will be publicly notified in accordance with the requirements of Schedule 1 of the RMA.

15.     The land subject to Plan Change 34 adjoins Private Plan Change 35 (Tauriko Business Estate – Stage 4). Both areas were brought into the City as part of the local Government Commission decision in 2021. For these reasons it is intended to notify the two plan changes concurrently.

16.     Following the submission and further submission process, the proposed plan change is required to proceed to a hearing and recommendation process.

17.     After the submissions and further submissions have been received, approval will be sought from Council for the appointment of a Hearings Panel or an Independent Hearings Commissioner to hear and make recommendations on the Plan Change to Council.  This will consider the role of elected members being part of a Hearings Panel. 

18.     The decision to adopt those recommendations will rest with Council following the hearing of submissions and receipt of the Hearing Panel or Independent Hearings Commissioner(s) recommendation report.

 

Attachments

1.       PC34 - City Plan Annotated Text - A15462394

2.       PC34 - City Plan Planning Maps - A15462392

3.       PC34 - Section 32 - A15462476  

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 






Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 






Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

















 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.4       Recommendation on Private Plan Change Request for Rezoning at 120, 125 Upper Ohauiti Road

File Number:           A15415297

Author:                    Brad Bellamy, Project Leader: Urban Planning

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to seek a decision from Council on how to deal with a request to change the Tauranga City Plan made by Landsdale Developments Limited.

 

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Recommendation on Private Plan Change Request for Rezoning at 120, 125 Upper Ohauiti Road".

(b)     Accepts, in whole, the private plan change request by Landsdale Developments Limited in accordance with clause 25(2)(b) of Schedule 1 of the RMA and that the request be notified as soon as practicable.

(c)     Delegates authority to the General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance to approve the notification of the request in accordance with the provisions of the First Schedule to the Resource Management Act 1991.

(d)     Requires adherence to the Council’s policy of full recovery of costs associated with processing the private plan change request (Private Plan Change 39).

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       Landsdale Developments Limited have made a request to change the Tauranga City Plan (‘the request’) to rezone land at 120 and 125 Upper Ohauiti Road. The request seeks to create a new residential zone over this land and includes new provisions for the site and consequential changes to the location of the existing Greenbelt Zone over the site.

3.       The request sets out the reasons for the change and contains an evaluation report prepared in accordance with section 32 of the Resource Management Act 1991 (the Act). It also includes associated assessments of the environmental effects anticipated by the change.

4.       The request has been prepared to the point where it is now appropriate to consider how it will be dealt with. The level of information provided with the request is considered satisfactory to make this determination in that it sets out the effects the new residential zone will have on the environment, the ways in which any adverse effects may be mitigated, the benefits and costs and effectiveness of the request and finally the nature of consultation that has been undertaken.

5.       It is recommended that the request be accepted in whole, and that notification be completed in accordance with Schedule 1 of the Act.

Background

6.       The land subject to this request is located at 120 and 125 Upper Ohauiti Road at the southern extent of the City’s territorial boundary. This land is shown in Figure 1.

 

 

 

Figure 1: Aerial Photo and Site Location shown in red outline.

 

7.       The total land area comprises around 56.4 hectares with approximately 13.9 hectares located on the eastern side of Upper Ohauiti Road (‘eastern block’) and 42.5 hectares located on the western side (‘western block’) of this road.

8.       Landsdale Developments Limited (‘Landsdale’) has made the request but is not currently the owner of all land that relates to this request. A conditional Sale and Purchase Agreement is in place between Landsdale and the owner for the Eastern block. In relation to the Western block, it is understood that discussions are well advanced and that a similar Agreement is anticipated by both the owner of the land and Landsdale.

9.       The eastern block is currently zoned Rural under the Tauranga City Plan (City Plan). This block adjoins existing residentially zoned land to the north (Ohauiti suburb) and a stormwater reserve to the east.  A larger rural zoned site (within TCC jurisdiction) is located along the southern boundary.

10.     The western block is currently zoned both Rural and Greenbelt. It adjoins the Rural Residential Zone at Boscabel Drive to the north and other Rural zoned land along the western and southern boundaries.  The land adjoining the western and southern boundaries of this block are within the Western Bay of Plenty District.

11.     The request includes substantial technical assessment which has informed the location and extent of proposed zoning, and developable area within both blocks. The total developable area of the land is approximately 23.5 hectares, or 42% of the total site area. The remaining areas are proposed to retain the existing Greenbelt Zone, albeit in altered locations across the blocks.

12.     Development within the new residentially zoned areas is proposed to be staged and intended to commence initially within the eastern block. Along with a number of preliminary infrastructure upgrades that have been identified to enable commencement within this block, there is the likelihood of further upgrades being necessary as development progresses over time, including prior to any future development within the western block. An overview of the request is provided as Attachment 1.

13.     Transportation related matters have been considered through both technical assessment and modelling work. A series of localised road network upgrades are proposed, with the conclusion that wider network effects whilst noticeable will not compromise the planned long term network upgrades proposed through the Transport System Plan. At a high level the detail provided with this request sets out these matters to an acceptable standard and would be considered further as part of the notification and submission process.

14.     The request describes the developable area as being designed to enable residential development at an anticipated density of approximately 20 dwellings per hectare. This would translate to approximately 470 dwellings in total with a split of 145 houses in the eastern block and 325 in the western block. The request includes new City Plan provisions that are intended to support the delivery of this level of development.

Strategic / Statutory Context

15.     Tauranga City is a Tier 1 urban environment under the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD). Tauranga City Council (TCC), as a Tier 1 local authority, must satisfy the requirements of the NPS-UD with respect to providing sufficient development capacity within the city to meet the expected demand for housing in existing and new urban areas in the short term, medium term, and long term.[2]

16.     TCC does not meet the residential development capacity requirements set out in the NPS-UD in the short, medium or long term. This is set out in detail in the SmartGrowth Housing & Business Capacity Assessment.[3]

17.     This land has previously been identified as a future urban growth area (referred to as Upper Ohauiti) within the Bay of Plenty Regional Policy Statement (RPS) and the Smartgrowth Settlement Pattern 2013.  It is currently located within the urban limits set out under the RPS.[4] The Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Plan Study (2020) identified this land as having potential for feasible development capacity.

18.     The land is identified within the SmartGrowth Housing & Business Capacity Assessment, and most recently in the Draft SmartGrowth Strategy 2023 – 2073 as an urban growth area (referred to as Ohauiti South) where residential development is anticipated within the medium term (2027 – 2034). Enabling residential development capacity within this area is therefore not only anticipated but is an important part of the growth management strategy for the city and sub region. 

19.     An evaluation report in accordance with section 32 of the RMA has been prepared and considers whether the content of the change request is the most appropriate course of action. This evaluation report is included as Attachment 2.

Options Analysis

20.     Requests to change a district plan can be made by any person under clause 21 (1), Part 2, Schedule 1 of the Act. They are not overly dissimilar to a council-initiated plan change, but often fit a timeline more suited to the requestor and typically provide some type of private benefit.

21.     The request for this change was originally made to TCC by Landsdale on 8 April 2022. It was assessed by staff and was subject to a further information request on 3 June 2022. The further information request was responded to on 11 August 2023 and included a range of updated and new assessments. It also included an updated record of consultation undertaken with Tangata Whenua.

22.     The updated information provided in August of 2023 has been subject to further review by staff. There has been the need for an additional request in respect to some aspects of this information, particularly on matters relating to infrastructure capacity and transportation.  There has also been discussion around the residential zoning proposed for the site. The zoning proposed has been updated and will now include the Medium Density Residential Zone and be subject to the medium density residential standards as is currently required under the Act (cl 25 (4A)). A full updated version of this information was provided to TCC on 26 January 2024. The request is considered to include a level of detail that now allows Council to determine how it should be dealt with.

23.     Figure 2 shows the existing City Plan Zones. Figure 3 shows the changes requested to the zoning for this site.

Figure 2: Existing City Plan Zoning

Figure 3: Proposed Changes to Zoning for the site.

 

24.     Clause 25 of Schedule 1 of the RMA requires a local authority to consider the request and make a decision on how the request will be dealt with. The four options available to TCC under clause 25 include:

·    To ‘adopt’ the request, or part of the request, as if it were a plan change made by the local authority itself (clause 25(2)(a));

·    To ‘accept’ the request in whole or in part, in which case it remains a private plan change (clause (clause 25(2)(b);

·    To deal with the request as if it were an application for resource consent (clause 25(3)); or

·    To ‘reject’ the request in whole or in part but only on the matters set out under subclause (4)(a)-(e).

25.     The option to either ‘adopt’ or ‘accept’ the request does not mean that TCC has approved the plan change. There is still the requirement to notify the request and then subsequently hold a hearing before a decision to approve, approve with modifications, or decline the plan change is made.

26.     To determine which of these options should be progressed, it is appropriate to consider the information provided with the request, including the evaluation report prepared and any other relevant matters set out in the Act. In this regard, the following comments are made:

i.   Adopt the request, or part of the request – this option would mean that the request is dealt with as if it were a council-initiated, or public plan change. This option implies that TCC generally supports the change proposal (subject to the hearings process) and will bear the cost of managing the plan change from the date that it adopts it including being responsible for providing all the necessary technical support for the hearing. In this instance the request relates to a discrete and confined area with significant private benefit. The request is not part of TCC’s current policy work programme and while it is acknowledged that this request does seek to increase residential development capacity, the rezoning and change to City Plan provisions would be site specific and not have broader application across the city.

ii.  Accept the plan change – this option would mean that the request remains a private plan change and that the request can proceed to be notified as set out under clause 26 (Notification timeframes) of Schedule 1. All costs associated with the request (including notification and any subsequent hearing) can be recovered from the applicant. As noted above, the request has significant private benefit and relates to a discrete area of land. This option allows the request to be considered outside of TCC’s current work programme, or next city-wide full plan review process.

iii. Convert plan change request to a resource consent – this option would mean that the request is processed under the relevant resource consent provisions of the RMA. Advancing this proposal as a resource consent would rely on the existing Rural and Greenbelt Zone provisions in the City Plan, which do not support the level of development being advocated for under the request proposal. Such an approach would not be efficient and would be unlikely to result in a positive outcome.

iv. Reject the plan change – this option could be taken if the request was considered to meet any of following grounds (cl 25(4)):

(a)   The request or part of the request is frivolous or vexatious; or

(b)   Within the last two years, the substance of the request or part of the request 

i. has been considered and given effect to, or rejected by, the local authority or the Environment Court; or

ii.     has been given effect to by regulations made under Section 360A; or 

(c)   The request or part of the request is not in accordance with sound resource management practice; or

(d)   The request or part of the request would make the policy statement or plan inconsistent with Part 5; or

(e)   In the case of a proposed change to a policy statement or plan, the policy statement or plan has been operative for less than two years.

None of the grounds set out above are considered to apply to this request. It is noted that the request includes an evaluation report that has considered the zoning options for the site along with introducing new site-specific provisions to support a land use change for residential purposes. This request has also taken into account the nature of the adjoining urban area. This work is supported by a series of technical assessments that have been reviewed by Council staff. It has been concluded that this request is in accordance with sound resource management practice and that rejection of the request is not appropriate in this instance.

27.     Based on the discussion set out under para. 26 accepting the request as a private plan change under clause 25(2)(b) is the preferred option. This option recognises the potential advantages that can come from a rezoning outcome, but also acknowledges that this request is confined to a specific land area with significant private benefits. This option also retains the ability for TCC to make a separate submission to this plan change where it is determined that further refinements to provisions would be appropriate. This may be appropriate in terms of further addressing matters relating to transportation and the appropriate sequencing of infrastructure (e.g. water, wastewater, stormwater) to service stages of the development.

28.     Notwithstanding this, the information accompanying this request is considered to be in a form that is acceptable and includes an appropriate level of detail for the purposes of making this decision and for the public to understand the nature of the request and make submissions on the request if they choose.

29.     Under this option, the default position is that Landsdale would be responsible for the costs of this process, in line with TCC policy being to recover staff time on processing this request. These costs will also include TCC responsibilities under the Act to hear submissions and give a decision on the matter.

Financial Considerations

30.     TCC policy is to recover costs associated with private plan changes as provided for in the legislation.

Legal Implications / Risks

31.     The risks associated with this plan change request sit primarily with the applicant. Whilst the outcome is of relevance to all parties, given its relevance to growth management, in this instance Council’s risk is considered low as processing requirements are set out under the Act and TCC’s own Procedure and Process Manual.

Consultation / Engagement

32.     Consultation and engagement associated with this plan change request is required by the Act. This has been undertaken by the applicant as part of preparing their s32 report as required by Schedule 1 of the Act. The Act also requires the plan change request to be publicly notified for submissions and further submissions. This gives the community and other interested parties the opportunity to input into the process.

33.     Schedule 1 clause 4A of the Act also requires pre-notification with iwi authorities. This would be required to occur in the time between the TCC accepting the plan change request and notification.

Significance

34.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against TCC’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  TCC acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the decision. In this instance the relevance of this matter to the important issue of growth management is noted.

35.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the decision.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

36.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the decision is of medium significance.

Next Steps

37.     Pre-notification is to occur with the relevant iwi authorities in accordance with the Act. This will include reviewing feedback from iwi authorities on this request and making any necessary changes to the request, in consultation with the application, prior to notification.

38.     A decision on notification of this plan change request is required. Notification can then be completed in accordance with that decision and the requirements of Schedule 1 of the Act. It is noted that whilst limited notification of the request is an option available under Schedule 1, the nature of the request is such that public notification would be more appropriate in this instance.

39.     Following the submission and further submission process, the plan change request will proceed to a hearing and associated decision process.

40.     During the submissions and further submissions process, approval will be sought from Council for the appointment of a Hearings Panel or an Independent Hearings Commissioner(s) to hear and make recommendations on the Plan Change to Council.  This will include whether there is elected member involvement as part of a Hearings Panel.

41.     The decision to adopt the Hearing’s recommendations will rest with Council following the hearing of submissions and receipt of the Hearing Panel or Independent Hearings Commissioner(s) recommendation report.

Attachments

1.       Plan Change Request - Main Report - A15466399 (Separate Attachments 1)  

2.       Section 32 Evaluation Report - A15466402 (Separate Attachments 1)   

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.5       Destination Skatepark - Completion of Community Design

File Number:           A15489896

Author:                    Amanda Davies, Manager: Spaces and Places Project Outcomes

Authoriser:              Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Community Services

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to approve an increased scope of work for the Destination Skatepark that would see zones 3 and 4 added to the project construction scope and the completion of the construction of the full community design.  This would require updated total project budget of $4,945,080 for the destination skatepark.  The updated budget includes a total of 55% external funding with a total value of $2,696,217.

 

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Destination Skatepark - Completion of Community Design".

(b)     Approves the addition of zones 3 and 4 to the construction scope as part of the completion of the full community design.

(c)     Approves an updated total project budget for the construction of the full community design of $4,945,080 which includes a total of 55% external funding to a total value of $2,696,217.

(d)     Approves the allocation of the updated project budget to the 2024 financial year ($3,805,157)

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       On 27 June 2022, during the adoption of the Annual Plan 2022/23, Council approved a budget of $2.05 million for the development of a destination skate park. This funding was approved on the basis that up to 50% of external funding contributions would be sought.

3.       On 7 February 2023, a paper was presented to council after the confirmation of the total amount of external funding was confirmed. Council approved an updated total project budget of $3,610,081.  This included a total of 62% of external funding to a value of $2,211,217, and a council contribution of $1,371,831. 

4.       At the council meeting on 7 February 2023 a range of delivery options were presented and council. Council approved the delivery of Option B – the construction of zone 1 and 2 of the skatepark.  This left zones 3 and 4 the balance of the community design to be scheduled for future funding, and estimated required council contribution was placed into the LTP 2024-34. 

5.       After the Council meeting on 7 February 2023, funders approached Council Staff, expressing an interest in funding the construction of zones 3 and 4 and seeing the entire skatepark community designed scheme constructed.  Additional external contributions have been obtained my council.

6.       Currently zones 1 and 2 of the skatepark are in construction and progressing well with the contractor well on programme to complete the current Zone 1 and 2 scheme in early 2024.

7.       From a construction and cost perspective, it would make sense if council were to proceed with the construction of Zones 3 and 4 as part of the current construction contract. This additional scope of work would be added to the current construction contracts.  Construction of the full scheme would be completed in Mid-2024.

8.       Adjusting the budget this year would mean that money put into the draft LTP to cover the difference can be deleted.

Background

9.       During Long Term Plan (LTP) engagement, Council has received numerous requests to improve, invest and expand our skating facilities.  At the time of submissions existing facilities are generally small in are and outdated in what they offer.

10.     The demand for larger and more modern skating facilities has increased in line with the rising popularity and profile of the sports.

11.     In October – November 2021 council surveyed wheel spinning user groups such as skaters, scooters, trick BMX, and other roller groups to help inform ‘why and where you skate’ and ‘what makes a good skatepark’.

12.     Council received 517 responses supporting the development of additional roller sports facilities in the city.  People were also asked for their interest to be part of a Community Co-Design Group to help form up what the skatepark would look like.  Over 250 people put their hands up to participate.  From this 250, 24 people representing different modes of roller sports and demographics formed the Community Design Group.

13.     The Community Design Group has a series of workshops to feed into the design of the skatepark facility.  The technical design of the skatepark offers something for all ages and abilities and key features will allow for the progressing of skating abilities as well a catering for roller modes.  Stand out features of the skatepark will include a flow bowl, a surf/skate ditch and competition style stairs and street skate area.

14.     The Park also provides a cohesive and quality environment that encourages users (and their friends and family) to stay and enjoy the public open space.  Seating, BBQ areas, and other park amenity will take advantage of the best vantage points to watch the activity in the skatepark.

15.     The Destination Skatepark will provide an inclusive and accessible facility for Tauranga that attracts a wide range of demographics, gender, and backgrounds. It will encourage users to be active, creative, and to have fun in a suitable outdoor environment which will have physical, mental, and social benefits for the community.

16.     On 27 June 2022, during the adoption of the Annual Plan 2022/23, Council approved a budget of $2.05 million for the development of a destination skate park. This funding was approved on the basis that up to 50% of external funding contributions would be sought.

17.     On 7 February 2023, a paper was presented to council after the confirmation of the total amount of external funding was confirmed.   Council approved an updated total project budget of $3,610,081.  This included a total of 62% of external funding to a value of $2,211,217, and a council contribution of $1,371,831. 

18.     Currently zones 1 and 2 of the skatepark are in construction and progressing well with the contractor well on programme to complete the current zone 1 and 2 scheme in early 2024

   

  

Pictures: Skatepark Construction as of January 2024

23       Since the commencement of construction of zones 1 and 2 additional external funding has been obtained towards the construction of the full community design.  This would see zones 3 and 4 of the skatepark constructed.  The intention was to undertake this work in FY 25 and a funding had been placed in the LTP 2024-34 to undertake this work. However, obtaining the additional external funding early has created an opportunity to complete this work earlier than anticipated.

24       From a construction and cost perspective, it would make sense if council were to proceed with the construction of Zones 3 and 4 while the current skatepark contractor is onsite. This scope of work should be added to the current construction contracts.  This would mean that construction could seamlessly continue onsite.  This would deliver cost savings as the work would not be subject to escalation and contractor reestablishment costs.  

25       It is proposed to vary the existing construction contracts (AMC and GT Civil) to include Zones 3 and 4 and build the entire scheme while the skatepark contractor is onsite. Construction of the full scheme would be completed in Mid 2024.

Strategic / Statutory Context

19.     The destination skatepark project is a key initiative that will enable us to meet our community outcomes of a city that is “well planned with a variety of successful and thriving compact centres, resilient infrastructure, and community amenities” and one that, “values our natural environment and outdoor lifestyle, and actively works to protect and enhance it”.

Financial Considerations

20.     The proposed funding breakdown for the construction of the full community design is outlined below:

 

 

Confirmed External Funding

$

TECT

1,023,000

Lotteries

528,847

NZCT

659,369

Project Tauranga

200,000

Grassroots

250,000

Lion Foundation

35,000

 

 

Total External Funding (55%)

2,696,216

 

 

TCC Contribution (45%)

2,248,864 

 

 

Total Construction Budget

4,945,081

Consultation / Engagement

21.     Consultation on this project was undertaken during the Annual Plan 2022/2023 process.

Significance

22.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

23.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)    the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)    any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the .

(c)    the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

24.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the decision is of low significance.

ENGAGEMENT

25.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the decision is of low significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

Next Steps

26.     Once the updated scope and budget has been approved, the additional work package will be awarded to the skatepark contractor, for completion in Mid 2024.

Attachments

Nil

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.6       Transport Resolutions Report No.49

File Number:           A15424301

Author:                    Will Hyde, Senior Transportation Engineer

Anna Somerville, Manager Network Safety & Sustainability

Authoriser:              Nic Johansson, Head of Transport

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      To obtain a resolution from the Commission to introduce, amend or remove various traffic controls in the Attachments to the Traffic and Parking Bylaw (2012).

 

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Transport Resolutions Report No.49".

(b)     Resolves to adopt the proposed traffic and parking controls as per Appendix A relating to minor changes for general safety, operational or amenity purposes, to become effective on or after 13 February 2024 subject to appropriate signs and road markings being installed.

 

 

Executive Summary

General Matters

2.       The Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2012 includes Attachments which list various traffic and parking restrictions.  Council can amend the Attachments by Council Resolution.

3.       This report sets out amendments to the following Attachments to the Bylaw:

(a)     Attachment 3.1: Shared Pedestrian / Cycle Paths & Cycle Paths (in Road Reserve)

(b)     Attachment 4.1:   Special Vehicle Lanes – Passenger Service Vehicle Lanes (Including Bus Lanes)

(c)     Attachment 4.3:   Special Vehicle Lanes – Cycle Lanes

(d)     Attachment 7.1:   No Parking Behind Kerb

(e)     Attachment 7.2: Prohibited Stopping and Standing of Vehicles

(f)      Attachment 7.7    Mobility Parking

(g)     Attachment 7.8:   Motorcycle Parking

(h)     Attachment 7.9:   Parking Time Restrictions

(i)      Attachment 7.12: Pay Areas

(j)      Attachment 7.15: Loading Zones

(k)     Attachment 7.21: Passenger Service and Other Vehicle Stands (Stopping Places for Buses)

4.       Appendix A sets out proposed changes for general safety and operational reasons, principally requests from the public or other stakeholders for numerous small changes to parking controls which traffic engineering staff have deemed to be appropriate.

5.       All proposed amendments will become operational on 13 February 2024 or when the appropriate signs and markings are put in place.

Background

General Matters

6.       The amendments set out in Appendix A are changes proposed to reflect and support operational and safety needs on the road network.

7.       The proposed amendments are minor changes to parking or movement restrictions across the city which have arisen through requests from the public, transportation staff or other stakeholders; changes resulting from approved developments; plus other minor changes deemed necessary by the Network Safety and Sustainability team.

Strategic / Statutory Context

8.       The amendments achieve the vision and strategic transport priorities to help make our network safer and easier for people to get around the city.

Options Analysis

9.       For the proposed changes related to general operations the reasons for each proposal are described in Appendix A.  In each case the problem identified is expected to continue if the proposed amendment is not adopted.

Financial Considerations

10.     Negligible – the signs and markings costs associated with general operational changes can be accommodated within existing project or operational budgets.

Legal Implications / Risks

11.     The bylaw amendment is needed to allow enforcement of changes deemed necessary for safety and amenity purposes.  Council has an obligation to address known safety issues on the road network.

Consultation / Engagement

12.     The amendments proposed in Appendix A have been assessed as being of a minor nature.

13.     Consultation is generally not required for minor stopping and parking amendments, or other minor amendments required to support operational or safety improvements.  Where consultation or engagement has been undertaken, details are provided in Appendix A.

Significance

14.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

15.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the decision.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the decision is of low significance.

ENGAGEMENT

16.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the decision is of low significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

Attachments

1.       Appendix A - T&P Bylaw Amendment 49 - A15477095  

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 











 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.7       Temporary Road Closures - Events

File Number:           A15439770

Author:                    Lindsay Cave, Team Leader: Corridor Access & Temporary Traffic Management

Jenna Quay, Events Facilitation Manager

Authoriser:              Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      To seek Council approval of temporary road closures for upcoming events.

 

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receive the report of Temporary Road Closures – Additional Event Road Closures 2024

(b)     Pursuant to Clause 11(e) of the Tenth Schedule of the Local Government Act 1974, grants approval to close the roads and car parks listed on Attachment A to ordinary vehicular traffic on the dates and during the hours stated for the purposes of facilitating safe and successful operations during the following events in Tauranga.

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       Pursuant to Clause 11(e) of the Tenth Schedule of the Local Government Act 1974 this report seeks the Council approve the temporary road closures associated with events and activities in Tauranga.

3.       The road closures aim to provide a safe and well-organised events for public to attend, protect competitors, manage the transport network and minimise impacts to residents and businesses while events are taking place.

4.       The organiser of each event will:

·    Undertake engagement with affected residents and businesses prior to the event occurring.

·    Submit a temporary traffic management plan for approval as part of the overall event approval process.  This plan stipulates all traffic signage indicating sections of roads or carparks closed, alternative detours and, any other appropriate signage for traffic control and advance warning of road closures in accordance with the Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (CoPTTM).

Background

5.       Temporary road closures had previously been approved by Council on 27 November 2023. These new closures are required after operational planning meetings were undertaken for these events and play an important role to ensure the safety of event participants and the public is maintained.

Road closures allow for safe access to, during and from events by creating separation of traffic from pedestrians.  Event activities are managed within any City Plan, resource consent and corridor access approval conditions which include requirements such as noise management and communication plans. 

Strategic / Statutory Context

6.       Tauranga City Council has the authority to close roads under the powers of the Local Government Act 1974 – Clause 11(e) of Schedule 10.

Legal Implications / Risks

7.       The formal approval of road closures by the Council is part one of a two-part approval process. 

In additional to seeking this approval under the Act part two requires a warranted Site Traffic Management Supervisor (STMS) to submit a traffic management plan (TMP) to the Corridor Access team who has delegated authority as a Traffic Management Coordinator (TMC) to review and approve a temporary road closure in accordance with the Code of Practice for Temporary Traffic Management (CoPTTM).

The traffic management contractor has a duty to ensure so far as reasonably practicable the safe and efficient movement of all road users through and around the working space.  This requires a risk assessment be completed prior to the implementation of a traffic management operation.

Consultation / Engagement

8.       All temporary road closures must be publicly notified by Tauranga City Council allowing a 21-day period for the public to submit comments.  Any objections must be considered by the Committee before making a decision on the requested temporary road closure.  

(a)     The temporary road closures were publicly notified on 18 January 2024 in the Bay of Plenty Times.

(b)     The consultation period finished on 8 February 2024. Staff to advise if any objections have been received at the Council meeting on 12 February 2024.

Significance

9.       Under the Significance and Engagement Policy 2014, these decisions are of low significance and do not require public consultation.

Attachments

1.       Temporary Road Closure Report - Attachment A (Council Meeting 12 Feb 2024) - A15467791  

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 



Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.8       Fifteenth Avenue to Welcome Bay Detailed Design Early Pre-implementation funding

File Number:           A15451467

Author:                    Jason Spencer, Transport Programme Manager - Dual Funded

Authoriser:              Nic Johansson, Head of Transport

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to request approval of a $3.5m Infrastructure Funding Facility (IFF) funded budget for the early pre-implementation work required for the Fifteenth Avenue to Welcome Bay project between March - September 2024 prior to the retrospective funding form and Detailed Business Case (DBC) being approved by Waka Kotahi.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Fifteenth Avenue to Welcome Bay Detailed Design Early Pre-implementation funding ".

(b)     Approves $3.5m of IFF funded budget before a decision is made by Waka Kotahi on the retrospective funding request and the DBC.

(c)     Accepts the increased level of costs to Council should the DBC not be approved by Waka Kotahi in September 2024.

 

Executive Summary

2.       This project aims to enhance the Fifteenth Avenue, Turret Road, and Welcome Bay Road corridor to alleviate congestion, improve options for active modes of transportation and public transit, and enhance access to essential destinations such as schools, maraes, and shops. The project's significance lies in its role as the primary link connecting Welcome Bay, Ohauiti, Hairini, Maungatapu, and the central and northern Te Papa Peninsula.

3.       The Western Bay of Plenty Transport System Plan (TSP) identified parts of this corridor as having high operating gaps, ranking as high as #4 with regards to peak hour congestion creating significant delays for busses and poor active modes. Additionally, the future form of the corridor is recognised as one of the key issues to address in the Western Bay of Plenty, emphasising the importance of this project in addressing identified gaps in level of service, access, and safety, particularly for cyclists.

4.       The project was initiated in 2021 and a Single Stage Business Case (SSBC) commenced in March 2022. It is currently in the DBC phase and is programmed to be submitted in June 2024 to Waka Kotahi (NZTA) for approval.

5.       Approval for the DBC is not expected until September 2024 but to align with Council’s Long-term Plan (LTP), pre-implementation works need to be undertaken before the DBC is approved to ensure a construction start date of July 2025.

6.       A retrospective funding request of $3.5 million for pre-implementation costs has been submitted to Waka Kotahi with the outcome expected in March 2024. Pre-implementation works will focus on detailed design work in Zone 2 (Hairini Bridge and causeway), including critical white fronted tern habitat investigations. In the most likely event the application is declined, we are seeking approval for pre-implementation costs to be covered by Council through the IFF until a decision on the DBC is confirmed.

 

Background

7.       In October 2021 Stantec was commissioned to conduct a strategic review of the project and offer recommendations to frame the scope of the business case, ensuring a well-informed and strategic approach to the project's development.

8.       The SSBC phase commenced in March 2022 with Stantec as the consultant to identify a preferred development option and staging, while also validating low-cost, low-risk alternatives exempt from the DBC stage.

9.       Alongside Stantec, Aurecon was procured to provide specialised advice to support the SSBC and DBC with regard to the Hairini Bridge and causeway condition and performance assessment. This focused on inundation levels, bridge condition, seismic capacity, liquefaction potential, and widening options. This confirmed the bridge is in good condition and three-laning of the bridge is possible.

10.     In February 2023, Commissioners agreed to an investigation of the option of a clip-on shared use path on the Hairini Bridge and to consult the public on shortlist options. Public consultation on the shortlist options took place during September/October 2023 to help inform the preferred option. There was support for a tidal flow lane across Hairini Bridge, improved shared/cycle paths and High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes along Fifteenth Avenue, with only minor changes proposed to the shortlist options.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11.     On 24 October 2023, Commissioners approved the completion of the DBC based on the preferred option and were supportive of pre-implementation works being undertaken prior to the DBC being approved by Waka Kotahi in order to meet the July 2025 construction commencement date.

12.     The project is currently in the final stages of the DBC phase and is expected to be completed by June 2024 with Waka Kotahi approval not expected until around September 2024. However, Council is planning to commence pre-implementation works prior to Waka Kotahi approval as this will enable construction to commence in July 2025 as per the LTP.

Strategic / Statutory Context

13.     The outcomes sought for this project align with the Government Policy Statement (GPS) strategic priority of ‘Better Travel Options – providing people with better transport options to access social and economic opportunities’ and also contribute to all four of the long-term objectives of the Bay of Plenty Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) 2021-31.  

14.     The Urban Form and Transport Initiative (UFTI) in the western Bay of Plenty sub-region includes the Connected Centres Programme - a 30 to 70-year plan to integrate land use and transport initiatives with key objectives including sustainable urban development, sufficient housing supply, and improved transport outcomes. The Fifteenth Avenue to Welcome Bay improvements will support multimodal access and safety, and address current deficiencies in the Welcome Bay area, including poor connections, lack of Māori land development opportunities, and infrastructure constraints.

15.     The TSP outlines a comprehensive strategy for prioritising transport investment, with projects such as Fifteenth Avenue to Welcome Bay aiming to enhance multimodal access, safety, and local amenity in the Te Papa Peninsula as part of the Connected Centres Programme.

16.     New Zealand’s road safety strategy sets out a vision where no one is killed or seriously injured in road accidents. The strategy sets a target of a 40% reduction in deaths and serious injuries by 2030. This project supports Road to Zero by improving safety with speed limit changes and the provision of better cycleway networks.

Options Analysis

17.     Three options are presented in this report that summarise the advantages and disadvantages of pre-implementation funding. 

Option 1 - Hold off on pre-implementation activities and wait until DBC approved by NZTA

Advantages

Disadvantages

-      No financial risk.

-      Reducing potential negative publicity.

-      Programme delayed.

-      Business continuity of internal/external resources.

-      Commercial IFF penalties.

-      Increased overall project costs.

-      Alignment with draft LTP

By postponing pre-implementation activities until a decision is reached by Waka Kotahi, Council avoids financial risk exposure and removes/reduces potential negative feedback from internal/external stakeholders by not continuing work at commercial risk. However, this incurs a significant 15% programme delay which introduces uncertainties related to labour, consultant retention, and market continuity, compounded by the pressure of slower IFF drawdowns and the potential 2.5% PA penalty for programme delays. In addition to this, pricing within the market and CPI increases could add additional cost to the project if delayed.

 

Option 2 – Hold off on pre-implementation activities, with retrospective funding application submitted, and await Waka Kotahi decision

Advantages

Disadvantages

-      Following Waka Kotahi process regarding retrospective funding.

-      Minor programme delays.

-      If declined Council is liable for all pre-implementation costs up to September 2024.

-      If approved, no guarantee of retrospective funding reimbursement, but likely.

This option has two scenarios whereby the retrospective funding application is approved or declined, and this will not be known until Waka Kotahi provides its decision which would be around March 2024.

If the retrospective funding application is approved by Waka Kotahi, they will only cover pre-implementation costs approved in the funding application once the DBC is approved. Any retrospective costs outside of the agreement will not be paid by Waka Kotahi or if the DBC is declined. The likelihood of the application being declined is high.

If the retrospective funding application is declined by Waka Kotahi and Council chooses to proceed with pre-implementation activities, then Council will be liable for 100% of pre-implementation costs up until September 2024 with minor programme delays while new funding is sourced.

 

Option 3 – Go forward with Pre-Implementation Works to be 100% IFF funded (Recommended)

Advantages

Disadvantages

-      No programme delays.

-      Aligns with draft LTP.

-      Business continuity of internal/external resources.

-      No IFF funding penalties.

-      No additional overall project costs.

-      Financial risk.

-      Reputational damage.

-      Funding will be repositioned from other projects.

 

This option ensures Council retains full control over the pre-implementation programme to meet the LTP construction date of July 2025 and provides certainty around retention of skilled and knowledgeable consultants, department collaboration and no additional impacts on overall project costs or penalties from IFF funding. Council is committing to cover 100% of pre-implementation costs at risk until such time as Waka Kotahi makes a decision on the DBC. This brings with it the potential reputational risks if the DBC is declined, and the need to reallocate funds from other projects in such a scenario.

Financial Considerations

18.     The pre-implementation phase of this project is expected to take place from March 2024 – March 2025 with a total cost of $7,740,000.

19.     The total project is estimated to cost $133m and has a maximum of the lesser of $50m IFF funding or 65% of the total project value.

20.     Funding for pre-implementation activities from March – September 2024 have been estimated at $3.5m and align with the current draft LTP forecasts to meet the July 2025 construction start date. It will be sourced from IFF funding and offset against realignment of budgets from other projects.

21.     The below cost split shows pre-implementation activities in two stages taking into consideration that the draft DBC will be presented to Council on the 8th April 2024.

 

March – April 2024 Pre-Implementation Budget

Managed Costs

$87,000

White Fronted Terns Detailed Design/Consenting

$16,000

Corridor Detailed Design/Consenting

$75,000

Contingency

$50,000

Risk

$50,000

Total

$278,000

 

 

 

May – September 2024 Pre-Implementation Budget

Managed Costs

$163,000

White Fronted Terns Detailed Design/Consenting

$84,000

Bridge and Causeway Detailed Design/Consenting

$1,400,000

Corridor Detailed Design/Consenting

$1,125,000

Contingency

$300,000

Risk

$150,000

Total

$3,222,000

 

22.     It is not yet known if Waka Kotahi will approve or decline the retrospective funding application but based on current policies it will likely be declined as the reasons do not meet Waka Kotahi’s criteria.

Legal Implications / Risks

23.     The key risk to the project is ensuring that construction work begins in July 2025. Pre-implementation works have been approved by Commissioners in principle and funding has been programmed as part of the draft Long-term Plan to ensure the July 2025 date is met.

24.     The July 2025 construction start date is not a Waka Kotahi prescribed date and its obligation is to follow the standard process of approval of the DBC before moving into pre-implementation phase. Council wants to proceed with pre-implementation work at risk of the DBC not being approved.

Consultation / Engagement

25.     Community engagement began with a workshop in May 2022 to connect with partners, discuss corridor issues, and share stories with representatives from Council, Waka Kotahi (NZTA), Bay of Plenty Regional Council and mana whenua. Subsequent meetings involved a broader range of stakeholders, including emergency services, government agencies, community groups, and more.

26.     In July 2022, a long list workshop included representatives from various organisations to explore corridor options. A follow-up workshop in October 2023 updated stakeholders on the project and presented short list options.

27.     Public consultation was held in June/July 2022 seeking the community’s views of improving the corridor with a survey asking them to share concerns, ideas on how they travel, the environment and how community wellbeing could be improved. The community told us they wanted more lanes, widening roads, building/upgrading bridges, implementing a tidal flow system, improving public transport, promoting alternative travel modes, ensuring pedestrian/cyclist safety, reviewing speed limits, creating alternative routes, and potentially constructing additional schools to mitigate travel distances for students and parents.

28.     Engagement with affected property owners about a future four-lane option along Fifteenth Avenue and Turret Road took place in August 2023 with The Property Group independently assisting Council with owner engagement and collecting feedback.

29.     Consultation on the short list options took place in September/October 2023 with a key outcome to confirm the preferred way forward for Turret Road and the Hairini Bridge and causeway (Zone 2). Support for a tidal flow system across Hairini Bridge, improved shared/cycle paths and HOV lanes along Fifteenth was strong and only minor changes are required to the shortlist options.

 

 

Significance

30.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

31.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the matter.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

32.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the decision is of medium significance.

33.     The issue is of medium significance due to unbudgeted expenditure of between $1M and $4M. 

ENGAGEMENT

34.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the decision is of medium significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

Click here to view the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy

Next Steps

35.     Proceed with pre-implementation activities including geotechnical, pile and pavement investigations, design, consenting and procurement; and white fronted tern habitat relocation prior to Waka Kotahi funding approval of the DBC. Therefore, these required works will utilise IFF funding until the DBC is approved by Waka Kotahi.

Attachments

Nil

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.9       Arterial Road Reviews - Recommended Transport Infrastructure Improvements

File Number:           A15465067

Author:                    Rhulani Mothelesi, Senior Traffic & Safety Engineer

Warren Budd, Team Leader: Transport Safety

Authoriser:              Nic Johansson, Head of Transport

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       To present to the Council key findings from a high-level review undertaken of the arterials across the city that looked at low-cost options to ease congestion until some of the larger business case projects in the Transport System Plan (TSP) are constructed.

2.       To request approval from the Council to authorize council staff to proceed with more detailed investigations and design of the recommended arterial road improvements.

 

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Arterial Road Reviews - Recommended Transport Infrastructure Improvements";

(b)     Authorises a move to the next step of detailed investigations and comprehensive designs be carried out this Financial Year to confirm the feasibility, scope, timing and costing of the recommended arterial road improvements; and

(c)     Notes that at this stage, the recommended improvements would likely be fully funded by TCC. There may, however, be an opportunity in the future to secure Waka Kotahi funding subject to the new Government Policy Statement (GPS) which is due to be released.

 

 

Executive Summary

3.       Arterial roads play a critical role in the movement of people and goods within the region. The recent increase in traffic resulting from the city’s rapidly growing population and increased economic activity, coupled with drivers’ high reliance on private vehicles, is placing increasing pressure on the city’s transport network and affecting the efficiency of the movement of people and goods.

4.       The TSP identifies transport investments needed to support future urban development and provides people with better travel choices. However, these TSP projects will only be implemented and constructed several years from now.

5.       The Council has decided to invest $20 million in currently unfunded low-cost improvements targeted at easing congestion and delays along the city’s arterial road corridors until the TSP projects are constructed. Several high-level arterial review reports were commissioned, focusing on arterial routes not already being considered for investment in the TSP.

6.       The high-level review reports found that there were very limited opportunities to improve congestion along these corridors without significant capital expenditure and acquiring land. However, in alignment with the Council’s mode shift initiatives and TSP outcomes, there were opportunities identified to support multi-modal transport (walking, cycling and public transport) and improve road user safety.

7.       An overview of the improvements recommended to be funded from the $20 million arterial road improvement budget is provided in paragraph 16 below. If these are approved by the Council, then more detailed investigatory work would be undertaken to confirm their feasibility, scope, costing and timing.

Background

8.       Arterial roads make a significant contribution to social and economic wellbeing, and link regionally significant places, industries, ports, and airports. They play a critical role in the movement of people and goods within the region. The extent of Tauranga’s arterial road network, which currently comprises around 102km of roads, is shown in Figure 1 below. An enlarged map is provided in Attachment 1.

Figure 1: Tauranga City's Arterial Road Network (current arterial roads are marked in dark blue)

9.       The recent increase in traffic resulting from our city’s rapidly growing population and increased economic activity, coupled with drivers’ high reliance on private vehicles, is placing increasing pressure on the city’s transport network and affecting the efficiency of the movement of people and goods.

10.     Solutions are needed to cater for future growth in the city, however, we do not have money or space to always build more roads to accommodate this growth. Instead, we must ensure people and goods can be moved more efficiently and effectively along the transport routes we do have. This requires a shift away from private cars and towards public transport, cycling and walking.

11.     Council, in partnership with the regional and local councils, Waka Kotahi, tangata whenua, Port of Tauranga, Priority One and KiwiRail, have developed the TSP which identifies the transport investments needed to support future urban development and provides people with better travel choices (including walking, cycling, buses, and vehicles).

12.     In the next few years, the TSP will focus on the delivery of these already committed projects, which include major public transport and mode shift initiatives. Business cases and the design for the next generation of substantial investments and larger projects will also commence in this time.

13.     Council has decided to invest $20 million in low-cost improvements such as changes to intersection form (roundabouts, traffic signals etc), increases in turning lanes, localised road widening, improvements to walking and cycling facilities, etc. These are targeted at reducing congestion across the network until some of the TSP projects are constructed.

14.     Six targeted Arterial Road Review reports were commissioned by the Council in the 2022/23 Financial Year to identify, at a high-level, areas where congestion could be improved. In total, the six commissioned arterial review reports reviewed around 47 km (or approximately 46%) of the city’s arterials – the reviews excluded arterials that are already earmarked for investment in current or upcoming TSP projects and business cases. The reviewed arterial corridors were located in the Mount Maunganui, Papamoa Beach, Tauranga South, Welcome Bay, Bethlehem, and Tauriko areas.

15.     Each report recommended potential short- and long-term improvements that could be considered for implementation. The extensive list of recommended improvements was assessed by council staff – the outcome of the assessment was a prioritised list of currently unfunded improvements that should be considered for funding from the arterial improvement budget.

16.     We prepared the Arterial Review Report in Attachment 2 which consolidates and outlines the findings from the arterial reviews. The key conclusions and recommendations from the review are summarised as follows:

(a)     Only a quarter (25%) of the issues identified along the arterials that were reviewed were related to corridor efficiency and traffic congestion. The review reports concluded that there were very limited opportunities to improve congestion along these corridors without significant capital expenditure and acquiring land.

(b)     The remaining 75% of issues identified along the reviewed arterials were related to the lack of multi-modal transport provision (i.e., insufficient or no infrastructure provided for PT, pedestrians, cyclists, and other active modes) and road user safety concerns.

(c)     It was identified that around 60%-65% of the improvements proposed in the review reports were currently unfunded. Given the limited arterial road improvement funding available, the unfunded improvements were prioritised with consideration to the four main outcomes of the TSP: movement, safety, environment, and prosperity.

(d)     Congestion easing improvements were generally given higher priority, but not at the expense of road user safety. Several multi-modal transportation improvements were also recommended as these improvements would contribute to promoting the shift to public transport and active modes (cycling and walking), resulting in fewer vehicles using the arterial network, especially during peak times.

(e)     A complete list of the improvements recommended to be funded from the $20 million arterial road improvement funding is outlined in the Arterial Review Report in Attachment 2. The recommended improvements include:

(i)      Congestion easing improvements:

(1)     Clearways at several locations, over a total length of 3.6 km;

(2)     Restricting turning movements at several minor intersections on Fraser Street during peak periods;

(3)     Turning/ merging lane extensions at two major intersections; and

(4)     Minor improvements to the layout of an existing intersection to improve traffic flow.

(ii)      Road safety improvements:

(1)     Improvements to existing on-street parking facilities to reduce conflict with through traffic and improve cyclist safety;

(2)     Improvements to existing road signage and pavement markings at several locations/ intersections (e.g., re-marking faded line markings, adding new advance warning signage, etc.);

(3)     Traffic calming/ speed management over approximately 20 km of roads; and

(4)     Improvements to existing pedestrian/ cyclist crossing facilities (e.g., new raised pedestrian crossings at several locations).

(iii)     Multi-modal transport improvements:

(1)     Improving approximately 2 km of walking/ cycling infrastructure (footpaths, cycle lanes, shared paths, etc.) to promote the shift to active modes; and

(2)     Improving operations at an existing bus stop/ bus lane (e.g., optimise bus gate timings).

17.     Approximately 70% of the arterial road improvement funding has been allocated to corridors within the Mount Maunganui and Papamoa Beach Road areas. These two areas have experienced significant urban growth in recent years, however, only a limited portion of the existing arterial road network has been earmarked for extensive improvement (e.g., the Maunganui Road corridor), with no other major improvements planned for the rest of the road network.

18.     It is recommended that following this review, more detailed investigatory work be carried out to confirm the feasibility, scope, project dependencies and inter-dependencies, timing and costing of the prioritised improvements. These detailed studies should also identify improvements that could potentially be funded in the future by other funding programmes or co-funded with Waka Kotahi.

Strategic / Statutory Context

19.     The recommended arterial road improvements align with the main outcomes of the TSP. Additionally, the recommended improvements support the Council’s mode shift outcomes - shifting away from private cars and towards public transport, cycling and walking.

Options Analysis

20.     Council options are outlined below:

 

Option 1

Maintain the status quo (Do Nothing)

Option 2

Implement the recommended interventions (subject to detailed investigations and design to determine the feasibility, scope, cost, and timing of the recommended arterial road improvements)

Advantages

-     Funding earmarked for arterial road improvements could potentially be redistributed to other projects/programmes.

-     Recommended improvements support TSP outcomes and mode shift initiatives to PT and active modes.

-     The recommended improvements are low-cost and would be relatively easy to install/ implement.

-     The improvements would alleviate congestion and improve road user safety in the interim period while the larger TSP projects are designed and constructed.

Disadvantages

-     Congestion levels remain unchanged/ worsen, further adversely impacting the local and wider community.

-     Increased driver/ community frustration.

-     No planned investment in arterial routes not included in a TSP project. These arterials are predominantly in the Papamoa/ Papamoa East area.

-     Does not align with TSP outcomes.

-     Improvements likely to be fully funded by the Council. However, there may be an opportunity to co-fund with Waka Kotahi, subject to the new GPS.

-     The community may not be supportive of some of the recommended interventions. There is generally negative sentiment towards construction, loss of parking and opposition to spending money on cycleways.

 

Financial Considerations

21.     The indicative cost of implementing the recommended arterial road improvements is just under $20 million ($19,905,000). The cost breakdown per improvement category is illustrated in Figure 2.

 

Figure 2: Indicative Arterial Road Improvement Costs

22.     Approximately 80% of the arterial road improvement funding is currently earmarked for the next two National Land Transport Programme (NLTP) periods (2024-27 and 2027-30), with the remaining 20% earmarked for long-term improvements that are proposed to be implemented beyond 2030.

23.     At this stage, the recommended improvements will be fully funded by TCC. However, there may be opportunities in the future (prior to implementation) to secure Waka Kotahi funding with a new GPS due to be released.

Legal Implications / Risks

24.     We can confirm that the recommendations in this report comply with the Council’s legal and policy requirements.

Consultation / Engagement

25.     At this stage, no community engagement is considered necessary until the detailed investigatory work is completed.

26.     Once it becomes, clear following the detailed investigatory work, which of the recommended interventions will be progressed, concept plans will be prepared. Community and iwi engagement will be undertaken for any interventions that will have a direct impact on stakeholders and the community (such as clearways). Feedback will be sought and incorporated into the concept plans where possible.

27.     No consultation will be undertaken during the design stage for interventions that will have minimal impact on the local surrounding community (such as remarking faded markings or replacing/ installing advance warning signs).

28.     Should the recommended interventions proceed to implementation, another round of engagement will be planned, targeting those residents and businesses directly affected by the construction, as well as commuters travelling through the project area.

Significance

29.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals, and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal, or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

30.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the proposal.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

31.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the proposal is of medium significance.

ENGAGEMENT

32.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the proposal is of medium significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

Click here to view the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy

Next Steps

33.     Should the Council accept the recommendations outlined above, staff will progress with detailed investigatory work and concept/ detailed design. Once these are completed, an update will be provided to Council about the final project locations, scope, and cost.

Attachments

1.       Road Hierarchy Map - A15468927

2.       Arterial Road Improvements_Funding Report - A15468928  

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 


























Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.10     Revision of the City Centre Movement Framework and Implementation of Enabling City Centre Movement Pilot Scheme

File Number:           A15466095

Author:                    Shawn Geard, City Centre Transport Advisor

Tom McEntyre, Principal Investment Advisor: Transport

Authoriser:              Nic Johansson, Head of Transport

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       The purpose of this report is to present the revised City Centre Movement Framework to Council, request Council to adopt the revised version, delegate any requirement amendments to the General Manager City Development & Partnership, and endorse implementation.

2.       This report outlines the Enabling City Centre Movement pilot project planned for implementation in March 2024.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Revision of the City Centre Movement Framework and Implementation of Enabling City Centre Movement Pilot Scheme ".

(b)     Adopts the revised City Centre Movement Framework.

(c)     Delegates the General Manager: City Development & Partnerships [via the Chief Executive] to ensure other documentation referencing the City Centre Movement Framework refers to this revision.

(d)     Endorses implementation of the City Centre Enabling Movement project.

 

 

Executive Summary

3.       The City Centre Movement Framework was included with the City Centre Action and Investment Plan (CCAIP) that was adopted by Council on 15 August 2022 as part of Resolution CO15/22/5.

4.       This plan involved several components, that under further scrutiny, require amendment to best support the continued growth of the city centre.

5.       The revised City Centre Movement Framework aims to balance a city centre that supports development with high amenity streetscapes and placemaking, while ensuring all people can access city centre services and businesses in an efficient way, utilising their preferred mode of transport.

6.       The City Centre Movement Framework aims to ensure that retail and civic precincts have large pedestrian spaces, while also ensuring that those who cannot move freely within these spaces (e.g. mobility limited, service delivery etc.) are provided the ability to travel and park within these spaces, and these pedestrian spaces are well connected to public transport and off-street parking.

7.       The City Centre Enabling Movement project implements, in an easy to change format, key changes to vehicle movement in the City Centre Movement Framework. This tactical urbanism approach enables the city centre to handle construction activities while providing for an enhanced streetscape environment. The pilot provides additional pedestrian space within the road corridor while providing for the ongoing construction.

8.       The City Centre Enabling Movement implementation is conducted as a pilot under the Land Transport Rule: Street Layouts 2023 (Section 3 Pilots of Street Layout Changes). Council staff will conduct regular feedback sessions with city centre stakeholders with the goal of refining the pilot as required. These sessions are planned to commence two months after installation, and then six monthly thereafter.

9.       This pilot project is proposed to be replaced by permanent implementation of the City Centre Movement Framework in the future.

Strategic / Statutory Context

10.     The CCAIP sits under the ‘Tauranga Tātaitia rā – we are a well-planned city’ – community outcome and weaves through aspects of sustainability, te ao Māori, and how we contribute to the region.

11.     The City Centre Movement Framework sits under the CCAIP and this update replaces the movement framework held within the CCAIP.

12.     The City Centre Movement Framework has been developed to enhance urban amenity streetscape while aligning with SmartGrowth’s Urban Form and Transport Initiative (UFTI, 2020), which identifies a ‘connected centres’ approach for the sub-region. This growth strategy anticipates that the Te Papa peninsula will see the most significant transformation in the sub-region over the next 30 years, with the city centre at its heart. A critical part of the UFTI programme is supporting a revitalised city centre that supports residential living, tertiary education, and office space.

13.     To maximise the commercial and residential development proposed within the City Centre area, and provide multi-modal options for Tauranga commuters, it is critical that the road corridor within the city centre provides for multi-modal options while enhancing amenity spaces.

14.     Implementing the City Centre Enabling Movement project as a pilot under the Land Transport Rule: Street Layouts 2023 allows the pilot to be implemented for two years outside the bylaw process. This enables rapid changes to be implemented, if required, that would otherwise not be possible within standard processes and procedures. This ensures that what is finally included within the bylaw, once the pilot is finished, is completely fit-for-purpose.

Key Updates to Movement Framework

15.     While developing an implementation plan for the City Centre Movement Framework, it was found that the original revision was highly aspirational, with a low probability of the goals being achieved within the lifetime of the City Centre Transportation Development Long-term Plan project.

16.     The key updates made to this framework have centred around supporting the initial vision of enhanced public space within inner city streets. This framework has also been more focused, with less intervention planned at some of the outer streets owing to a desire to target upgrades and funding to areas most likely to benefit.

17.     Traffic modelling has provisionally confirmed that the level of delay utilising this arrangement in the revised City Centre Movement Framework, is less than the original movement framework and in line with projections utilising the current network. The Enabling City Centre Movement pilot will aim to confirm this modelling.

18.     The updated framework removes the Special Vehicle Area (SVA) along Hamilton Street and instead, and utilises Hamilton Street and Harrington Street as a one-way system operating in a clockwise direction. This reduces points where vehicles must give way, while addressing enforcement issues.

19.     The Bus Spine now follows this one-way system, splitting the Civic bus stop into four single/split stops.


 

20.     The SVA along The Strand is replaced by a shared space with a one-way (northbound) vehicle zone. This shared space is to be designed in a way that easily enables closures, creating a full pedestrian zone during events and at other key times.

21.     Wharf Street (Durham Street to Willow Street), Willow Street (Wharf Street to Spring Street), Spring Street (Willow Street to Durham Street) will be made a one-way route (southbound). This will ensure access for vehicles through these blocks, while maintaining the enhanced pedestrian space connecting Grey Street and the Spring Street carpark, to the Civic Precinct.

22.     Willow Street (Wharf Street to Spring Street) is to become a shared space to further enhance this connection.

Enabling City Centre Movement 

23.     To pilot and enable the complete City Centre Movement Framework, two elements lent themselves to a tactical urbanism intervention. These are:

a.   The Hamilton Street/ Harrington Street one-way network; and

b.   The Wharf Street, Willow Street, and Spring Street one-way route.

24.     The key objectives of this pilot project are:

a.   provide for consistent wayfinding in and around the city centre during the period of intense construction activity;

b.   provide enhanced pedestrian spaces and enable these spaces to provide clarity of key wayfinding routes;

c.   allow access for everyone into and around the city centre; and

d.   support and test construction of the City Centre Movement Framework.

25.     Three new bus stops are to be included within the Enabling City Centre Movement project, with the aim of enhanced connectivity to the northern section of the city centre, these locations being:

a.   North side of Harington Street, west of Willow Street

b.   North side of Harington Street, west of The Strand

c.   South side of Hamilton Street, west of The Strand

The existing bus stop on Willow Street north of Hamilton St is to remain until 30 September 2028 at the latest, at which point this location will be replaced by a new stop along Hamilton Street, west of Willow Street.

Financial Considerations

26.     The cost to implement the City Centre Movement Framework is included in the City Centre Transportation Development Long-term Plan budget, along with drawing on Transportation city centre walking/cycling and public transport budgets.

27.     The cost of this revised movement framework is expected to be less than the original revision in terms of spend within vehicle space, however, taking into account the enhanced pedestrian spaces, this is expected to be a similar financial cost.

28.     The capital expenditure of the implementation of the Enabling City Centre Movement will be funded from existing Transportation budgets in the current financial year. The total cost is expected to be $1,200,000.

Legal Implications / Risks

29.     N/A

Consultation / Engagement

30.     The City Centre Movement Framework will form a key component of future public engagement around transportation in the city centre.

31.     The Enabling City Centre Movement project has been communicated with the directly affected stakeholders.

32.     The Communications and Engagement plan for the Enabling City Centre Movement pilot project will see wider community communication occur, once Council has adopted the implementation plan.

Significance

33.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

34.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region;

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the matter; and

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

35.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the matter is of medium significance.

Next Steps

36.     If Council approves the recommended option, the programme to deliver the Enabling City Centre Movement project is detailed as follows:

 Action 

 Date 

 Council approval

 12 February 2024

 Community communication

 14 February 2024 – 1 March 2024

 Procure physical works

 14 February 2024 – 21 February 2024

 Construction

 March 2024

 

Attachments

1.       City Centre Movement Framework - A15489986  

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 



Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.11     Tauranga Speed Management Plan

File Number:           A15466287

Author:                    Shawn Geard, City Centre Transport Advisor

Authoriser:              Nic Johansson, Head of Transport

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      To present to Council the options for proceeding with the development of a speed management plan.

 

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Tauranga Speed Management Plan".

(b)     Adopt one of the following approaches:

(i)      Continue developing a speed management plan focusing on safe speeds around schools, marae, and the city centre This will include community engagement and a Council decision will be required prior to implementation,

(ii)      Pause the development of a speed management plan until further advice is received from the Ministry of Transport,

(iii)     Cancel work on a speed management plan.

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       Tauranga City Council has funding for the development and implementation of a speed management plan. This funding might be at risk if the work on the plan is paused or cancelled.

3.       The development of a speed management plan is no longer mandatory following a change in central government and subsequent rule changes. 

4.       We are proposing to continue the development of the speed management plan.

Background

Speed management plan work to date

5.       Tauranga City Council regularly engages with schools and their communities through the Travel Safe team within Transportation. Requests to reduce speeds around schools are regularly received as increased traffic, along with higher observed speeds, is considered a significant risk to student’s safety,

6.       The development of a speed management plan was included in the Tauranga City Council Long Term Plan (LTP) Amendment 2021-31 as part of the Transport System Plan (TSP). This was also included within the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) where current funding of $1.5 million through Council and NZTA Waka Kotahi funds are committed to the development and implementation of the plan,

7.       Within the proposed LTP there has been $5 million of funding requested for implementation of the required hard infrastructure (via the Low Cost Low Risk Safety Programme) to assist with allowing road environments to support speed reduction, where speed limit changes do not sufficiently increase safety. This funding request has also been included in the current RLTP application, the result of which is not expected to be confirmed until after June 2024.

8.       The speed management plan was originally proposed to be consulted on in February 2024.  Key proposals within the Speed Management Plan are;

(a)     Introduce 30km/h within on roads immediately adjacent to schools. These would be Variable Speed Limits (VSL) as a standard with static limits being reserved to low volume roads where expenditure of more expensive VSL signs are impractical and roads where the current operating environment does not allow for higher speeds,

(b)     Introduce 30km/h within on roads immediately adjacent to marae. These would be Variable Speed Limits (VSL) as a standard with static limits being reserved to low volume roads where financial expenditure of more expensive VSL signs are impractical and roads where the current operating environment does not allow for higher speeds,

(c)     Introduce a permanent 30km/h zone within the city centre,

(d)     Introduce a VSL 30km/h zone on Cameron Road adjacent to Tauranga and Wharepai Domains,

(e)     Minor updates to the other speed limits across the city to address areas where development has significantly changed the road environment such as adjacent developments,

Summary of Rule Change and Minister’s Letter in Relation to Tauranga City Council

9.       Under the previous Land Transport Rule: Setting Speed Limits, Councils were required to decrease speeds around 40% of schools to 30km/h by 30 June 2024, with the remainder by 31 December 2027,

10.     Tauranga City Council through the Regional Transport Committee a letter addressed to the Bay of Plenty Regional Council from Hon. Simeon Brown, Minister of Transport, on 12 December 2023 notifying changes to the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022. Among other points, the requirement for a Council to have a speed management plan was removed. The minister noted: “I consider it is undesirable for RTCs and RCAs to apply public money and resources in developing speed management plans only to have to revisit the plans when the new Setting Speed Limit rule takes effect. Given this, if you have not already finalised your speed management plan, I encourage you to consider the new Rule before making final decisions.”

11.     The rule change referred to above enables Road Controlling Authorities (RCAs) such as Tauranga City Council to choose to develop speed management plans rather than the previous mandate,

12.     A rule replacement, expected as part of the government’s 100-day commitment, will ensure that when speed limits are set, economic impacts (including travel time), views of road users and communities are taken into account alongside safety,

13.     An updated rule will implement requirements around variable speed limits rather than permanent speed reductions to keep young New Zealanders safe when arriving at, or leaving school,

14.     The letter states the Government’s commitment to road safety while stating ‘I also note the policies within the previous Government’s so-called ‘Road to Zero’ strategy, in relation to speed limits, are no longer the Government road safety strategy for the purpose of the Rule.’

Strategic / Statutory Context

15.     Ensuring safety around schools, enabling young people to access education through active modes of transport can be brought into the Our Direction framework under the community outcomes;

(a)     Tauranga Mataraunui – An inclusive city

(b)     Tauranga Ara Rau – A city that we can move around easily,

(c)     Tauranga a te kura – A city that supports business and education

16.     Speed reduction within the city centre support the City Centre Movement Framework as part of the City Centre Action and Investment Plan and both community outcomes Tauranga Mataraunui, and Tauranga Ara Rau,

Options Analysis

17.     The options present for Council to adopt are listed in the below table, it is the recommendation from Staff that Option 1 be adopted to complete community engagement, ensuring a decision informed by the community can be progressed

Option

Opportunity

Risk

Financial

1.   Continue with proposed speed reduction around schools (variable where practicable) and implement speed reduction around schools by July 2024

Progress within current approved funding

While consultation needs to formally occur current feedback from schools is positive.

 

Significant change to the Setting Speed Limits Rule is expected, this could result in re-work

Mitigation: We have approached this plan practically with a whole community and focused on mitigating disruption, expected changes would be expected to be minor.

 

Currently, funding of $1.5 million is approved to undertake this option with the standard funding split of 51% NZTA funding, 49% Loan Funding up to $1.5 million

2.   Hold off on Speed Management Plan until future release of Setting Speed Limits Rule

No rework would be required

This delay would likely mean not spending approved funding and require very at-risk funding for implementation. There is a risk to student safety over this delayed period

Potential changes may require 100% TCC cost, likely still similar end cost as above option ($1.5 million)

 

3.   Do Nothing

 

Significant risk to student  safety around schools

 

 

 

Financial Considerations

18.     The current Council and NZTA Waka Kotahi commitments allow for Option 1 to be implemented with a 49% Council Loan, 51% National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) funding arrangement until 30 June 2024,

19.     As NLTF funding is currently not allocated post 30 June 2024 there is no commitment from NZTA Waka Kotahi that they would fund any speed reduction after this time, meaning Tauranga City Council may be required to fund 100% of speed reduction through loan funding,

 

Legal Implications / Risks

20.     No legal implications/ risks have been identified.

Consultation / Engagement

21.     As new information was presented prior to proceeding with engagement there has been no formal engagement on this topic,

22.     The Transportation Travel Safe Team has regular communication with school communities where road speeds are often presented, key themes include:

(a)     There has been general support from schools and their communities regarding slowing speeds around schools,

(b)     Schools on Arterial and Collector roads most commonly request speed reductions,

(c)     Some schools have considered removing their school road patrols, as they see these becoming too risky to manage with increased volume and speed,

(d)     There have been numerous near-misses where vehicles traveling at speed have not given way at controlled crossings, the speeds involved present significant risk of serious injury or death to students involved,

Significance

23.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

24.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the matter.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

25.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the matter is of high significance.

ENGAGEMENT

26.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the matter is of high significance, officers are of the opinion that the following consultation/engagement is suggested/required under the Land Transport Rule.

ENGAGEMENT

27.     Next steps are to be decided upon adoption of an option,

Attachments

1.       Letter - Minister of Transport to Bay of Plenty Regional Council - A15468914  

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 



 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.12     Order of candidate names for July 2024 election

File Number:           A15447741

Author:                    Coral Hair, Manager: Democracy and Governance Services

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to request a decision on the order of candidate names on the voting documents for the Tauranga City Council election on 20 July 2024.

 

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Order of candidate names for July 2024 election".

(b)     Determines that the order of candidate names on the voting documents for the Tauranga City Council election on 20 July 2024 and any subsequent by-elections be:

(i)      alphabetically by surname

OR

(ii)      in pseudo-random order

OR

(iii)     in random order

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       The next local government election in Tauranga will be held on Saturday, 20 July 2024.  A decision on the order of candidate names on the voting documents is required for each election.

Background

3.       Prior to the 2023 General Elections, the former Minister of Local Government announced that the next local government election in Tauranga would be held on Saturday, 20 July 2024 and a decision was also made to postpone the 2025 Tauranga City triennial election until 2028.

4.       The Single Transferable Vote (STV) system will be used for the election.

Strategic / Statutory Context

5.       Clause 31(1) of the Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states that a Council may make a decision about the order in which candidates’ names appear on voting documents. If Council does not wish to make a decision, the default position in the legislation is alphabetical order of surname.

Options Analysis

Option 1: Order of Candidates’ Names by Resolution

6.       Council may determine which order candidate’s names are to be presented on the voting paper.  There are three options:

(i)      alphabetical order by surname – candidates are ordered by surname in ascending alphabetical order.

(ii)      Pseudo-random order – the order of candidates is drawn by lot, and then each voting paper is printed with the same order of candidates.

(iii)     Random order – candidate names are shown in a different order on every voting paper. The order of candidates is determined randomly at the time each voting paper is printed.

7.       Alphabetical order is easy to use and understand and matches the way candidate names are displayed in the candidate information booklet. A potential disadvantage of alphabetical order printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list, however, that is generally related to booth voting and with postal voting the potential advantage to those at the top of the alphabetical voting lists is considered very small.

8.       Pseudo-random order requires the names of the candidates to be drawn by a lot, but each paper is the same.  This option goes some way to removing any perceived bias from alphabetical ordering of candidate names but still does not assist with levelling the playing field entirely. If the decision was made to have pseudo-random order, the public notice advising which candidates are standing must include the date, time and place at which the order of the candidates’ names will be arranged, and any person is entitled to attend.

9.       Random order, where each candidate name is generated randomly and shown in a different order on every voting paper, is considered to “level the playing field” with every candidate having an equal opportunity to be randomly selected at the top of the voting paper.

10.     Council has previously resolved to have candidates’ names in random order since the 2007 elections, including any by-elections.

Option 2: Default Alphabetical Order of Candidates’ Names

11.     If Council does not determine by resolution a preference, alphabetical order is used by default. 

Financial Considerations

12.     There is no difference between any of the three methods in terms of cost.

Legal Implications / Risks

13.     The risk of non-compliance with the electoral regulations is considered minimal as the default setting is for alphabetical order of candidate names.

Significance

14.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

15.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the decision.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

16.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the decision is of low significance.

ENGAGEMENT

17.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the decision is of low significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

Next Steps

18.     Public notices in the prescribed form will be circulated in the newspaper and on the Council’s election website https://www.tauranga.govt.nz/council/about-your-council/elections-2024.

19.     Voting documents will be prepared with the order of candidate names as determined by the Council.

20.     Nominations will open on 26 April 2024 and close at 12 noon on 24 May 2024.  Voting papers will be delivered from Saturday, 29 June 2024 and voting closes on Saturday, 20 July 2024 at 12 noon.

 

Attachments

Nil

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

11.13     Executive Report

File Number:           A15468273

Author:                    Stephen Burton, Acting General Manager: Infrastructure

Nic Johansson, Head of Transport

Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Community Services

Paul Davidson, Chief Financial Officer

Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy, Growth & Governance

Alastair McNeil, General Manager: Corporate Services

Sarah Omundsen, General Manager: Regulatory and Compliance

Gareth Wallis, General Manager: City Development & Partnerships

Authoriser:              Paul Davidson, Chief Financial Officer

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      To provide updates on key projects and activities.

 

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report "Executive Report".

 

 

Infrastructure

Sustainability and Waste

2.       Underway – Milestone claim for kerbside bins and distribution. Tauranga City Council and the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) have been working on a Deed of Variation for Waste Minimisation and Resource Recovery Initiatives, which has now been signed by both parties. The Deed includes funding towards kerbside bins and distribution as well as costs associated with the Te Maunga Redevelopment Project. Total costs to date equate to $10.6m, with MfE funding $8.9m (83.7%) and TCC funding $1,7m (16.3%). Now that the Deed of Variation is signed, the team will be working on completing the milestone claim. 

3.       Underway – Climate & Sustainability internal roadshow.  Following the adoption of our Sustainability Plan by the Executive Leadership Team last year, the Climate & Sustainability team is now running a roadshow across the organisation to raise awareness of sustainability and relevant actions in the Plan.  They will meet with around 20 key teams in person between January and March. Other teams will be offered a short 15-minute version of the presentation and all-staff webinars will be held later in the year.  The roadshow is shining a light on how all teams are contributing to TCC's sustainability success story and equipping staff to integrate sustainability in their work.

4.       Underway – Rainwater harvesting for ResourceWise and Waterline schools.  As part of our commitment to sustainability and building climate resilience in the community, we have launched a funding initiative to facilitate the installation of rainwater harvesting systems in local schools participating in our Resource Wise and Waterline education programme.  This project aims to encourage water conservation, reduce dependency on municipal water supplies and create educational opportunities for students to engage in sustainable practices.  In December, Resource Wise and Waterline schools were invited to submit applications for funding of up to $30,000 to support installing rainwater tanks on their premises.  Rainwater can be used for a variety of outdoor and indoor purposes, which means successful schools will save money and have an alternative water supply during water shortages.

Waters

5.       Underway – Opal Drive Wastewater rising main.  The new Opal Drive wastewater rising main has been commissioned to service growth in the Wairakei and Te Tumu areas, but has the additional benefit of enhancing community resilience and community amenity. The pipe has capacity for additional development and has been placed above ground (behind Fashion Island) under a new boardwalk, providing seismic resilience and year-round cycle and pedestrian access from Domain Road to Gravatt Road. We have retained the old pipe to enable flow to be switched between the two mains for resilience. The old main will be used for a few hours every month to ensure it remains operable.

6.       Underway – Water Watchers plan.  The Water Watchers Plan initiated in November 2021 remains in place. The combination of the Plan and intermittent rainfall has had a positive impact on water demand in the city, with the rolling 7-day average remaining below 50,000 m3 per day level. See the 7-day rolling average water usage graph below.

7.       Key Information:

·    To date, the Water Watchers Plan is working effectively, with water demand during summer well within expected limits.

·    The Water Watchers Plan has achieved an overall reduction in peak demand of about 7%.

·    The significant rain received in the past year has improved the recharge of the aquifers that feed TCC’s source water streams, which are currently running at levels higher than their average flows.

·    Demand increases during periods of no/minimal rainfall and normalise after any rain event.

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Transport

8.       Transport team restructure. The pace of growth in transport infrastructure is reflected in the capital programme budget, which has increased from approximately $30 million in 2019 to more than $100 million in 2023. We have made significant investment and improvements in the delivery of our transport function, to set it up for success and position us to meet increased expectations and demand. The team has grown from 30 staff to more than 80 since 2019.

9.       While these efforts have been successful, it is vital that we continue with further investment and improvements across the transport business, to deliver on the increased scale of our capital investment, while:

·    meeting increased community expectations

·    continuing to search for better ways to deliver our ongoing maintenance, renewals and low-cost low risk (LCLR) programmes, road safety projects, education, corridor access and mode shift work

·    and continuing the effort to improve our integration with other groups where interaction is needed to ensure a smooth-running business.

10.     A revised structure was implemented at the end of last year.  This:

·    provides appropriate governance for major transport projects and increased executive focus and confidence through the establishment of a major capital delivery unit and oversight group

·    establishes a new team to enable continuous improvement in transport by ensuring that goals, objectives and plans are supported with appropriate resources, processes and technologies which are integrated and aligned

·    strengthens our commercial savviness, procurement approach and network integration, in partnership with NZTA Waka Kotahi.

11.     The revised structure will take a few months to build and implement and the transition will be progressive.  We anticipate it will be fully-implemented and providing clear value by June.

12.     Underway – Monitoring heavy vehicle movements on Cambridge Road. Ongoing monitoring of heavy vehicle movements is being undertaken on Cambridge Road (using new video management system analytics), after the closure of Moffat Road to facilitate work on the Tauranga Northern Link (TNL). Compliance is quite high, with around 2-3 heavy vehicles per day using Cambridge Rd, with most using the designated detour on SH29/Takitimu Drive toll road (the HV tolls have been removed for the duration of the closure).

13.     Completed – Acon-allocated part of asphalt programme.  Acon has been allocated part of our asphalt Mill and Fill programme to address the impact of resource constraints on the Fulton Hogan (FH) maintenance contract.  Acon has picked-up the challenge and is performing very well, showing a can-do attitude, responsiveness, and excellent finishing work within tight timeframes and in difficult situations. This provides Council with additional resource and options for future maintenance contracts and enhances the local and regional contractor markets for future work. 

14.     Planning - Travel Safe’s ‘Time To Cycle’ programme.  Formerly February’s Bike Month, the extended Time To Cycle event calendar (now February, March, and April 2024) provides more opportunities to gain skills and confidence and learn to navigate the city safely by bike. The calendar is now showing in the My Tauranga event site https://www.mytauranga.co.nz/time-to-cycle).

15.     Time to Cycle is all about supporting community cycle safety upskilling through education, knowledge of safer routes, and encouraging regular bike maintenance. Tauranga has a lot of new cycling infrastructure, such as two-way cycleways and shared-paths, and a big network of lesser-known, off-road paths and trails (Tourism Bay of Plenty Cycle Trails Booklet 2023 https://www.mytauranga.co.nz/time-to-cycle)  that connect suburbs, neighbourhoods, and key destinations. Time to Cycle events/tours will highlight the safe use of these assets through events like historic rides, bike to work and other guided cycle tours. Riders will be able to check out new areas, meet new people, and learn to ride with confidence.

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A group of people riding bicycles

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16.     This programme caters for riders of all levels and ages with activities like learn-to-ride beginner bike skills, adult cycle skills, hands-on bike maintenance education, and fun activities. The popularity of e-bikes continues to rise and they are welcome at most Time to Cycle events. There are even e-bike specific activities, like e-bike skills courses, and an e-bike maintenance night. 

17.     Transport – Dual Funded Portfolio - Just before the Christmas shutdown, the Joint Venture (JV) removed Traffic Management (TM) equipment from the project corridor, leaving only a couple of areas under TM.  This meant that the 5th Ave mid-block could not have the Pedestrian temporary light control removed and this had to stay in place for the Christmas period.  This also applied to the 6th Ave intersection, as the lights had not been installed due to late delivery.

18.     Following a number of months of review and negotiations, a final JV contract figure for the CRS1 project was set at $89.9m.

19.     On the return from Christmas break the 5th Ave mid-block pedestrian crossing had gone live with the permanent traffic control now in place and the TM removed from this area.  The week of 22 January saw the 6th Ave Intersection lights installed, tested and made live.

20.     January saw the project go to ‘Practical Completion’ status, and a change to a lump sum contract. A letter of Intent for any changes and a defects close-out list are to be drawn-up and agreed with the JV.  An opening ceremony is scheduled for 22 February 2024 and a ‘Lessons Learnt’ session for all construction partners is booked in for 24 February. This will focus on the project highlights, lowlights and the learnings to guide the delivery of other Council projects.

Looking South from 3rd Ave, southbound.

Community Services

The items below are listed under the most relevant community outcome, but many alkso contribute to the other outcomes.

Tauranga Mataraunui – An inclusive city

21.     ln the week before Christmas, Te Ao Mārama – Tauranga Library hosted a lunchtime music series in the library featuring community-based musicians, including a gospel choir, harpist, waiata group, barbership group and a soloist. Positive feedback was received from both the public and performers. This is planned to become an annual event and include other community libraries.

22.     The Programmes team took advantage of the good weather to get out outside and engage with the public about our library’s offerings and upcoming schedule of programmes for 2024. These events also provide the opportunity to hear feedback and ideas and get to know the community better. During the Mount Beach engagement, the team saw approximately 80 people throughout the day and came away with some new ideas for tweens and teens, as well as hearing about popular programmes and events at other libraries from out-of-town visitors.

23.     Work has been underway for some months to introduce a payments kiosk for customers at He Puna Manawa and the Mount Hub. Development and integration with existing systems was completed in December and the kiosks were installed for use just prior to the Christmas break. All council payments can be made at the kiosks. The project team engaged with accessibility representatives to ensure the kiosks meet as many users’ needs as possible. Lifters have been added to enable it to change height at the press of a button and the text colour on-screen can be changed to assist with vision or sensory needs.

24.     On 8 December, Council sponsored a free Rainbow movie night at the Historic Village Cinema. The movie was the iconic ‘Priscilla, Queen of the Desert’. Feedback from those attending was excellent and the Diversity Advisor will continue to work with the Cinema Manager to host further events and movies for the Rainbow community that will contribute to social connectedness.

25.     Unfortunately, due to inclement weather, our New Year’s Eve Community Celebrations in Matua, Mount Maunganui, Papamoa, Greerton and the city centre had to be cancelled. However, we were still able to deliver pyrotechnics displays safely in the City Centre, Mount Maunganui and Papamoa, at both 9.30pm and midnight, with a positive response from the community on how much these were enjoyed during a damp welcome to 2024.

  

26.     In collaboration with the City Development & Partnerships team, the Event Delivery team hosted its second annual Tauranga Moana Bomb Competition at the Tauranga Waterfront on Saturday 16 December, with 59 competitors across three age categories. Spectators enjoyed watching and cheering on the participants, who wowed the judges with their manus, coffins and staples. Alongside the bombing competition, there were a number of free activities, including a sausage sizzle, Mr Whippy ice creams, and haircuts, along with other water-related stalls. The city centre was alive with people and the event was well-received by the community.

   

27.     The Event Facilitation team was kept busy with three major concerts at Wharepai Domain during the Christmas and New Year period, featuring L.A.B on 28 December, A Summer’s Day Live (Dire Straits Legacy) on 30 December and Bay Dreams North on 3 January. The events were well-executed, garnering positive feedback from both organisers and attendees. With thousands of people attending each concert, including 8,000 people for L.A.B, these events added vibrancy to the city centre, complementing other summer activations. The Police also commended the team for its effective management of these large-scale events.

28.     This Christmas season brought whānau and the community together throughout Tauranga thanks to the funding support of the local collaborative fund, Tauranga Western Bay Community Event Fund (TWBCEF) and TCC’s Legacy Event Fund.

TCC contributed $23,763 to the three community events below to celebrate Christmas in the city centre, Pāpāmoa and Bethlehem. These free, family-friendly community events allowed locals and visitors to come together, share a sense of belonging, and celebrate the festive season.

·    Carols on the Waterfront on 3 December

·    Papamoa Santa Parade on 10 December 

·    A Night Before Christmas, Bethlehem on 16 December

29.     The New Zealand Festival of Squash 2023 was a huge success, with almost 300 athletes and over 7,500 spectators enjoying the games and 200 volunteers helping make it happen. Held from 5 to 17 December, the Council-funded Festival included Top Shots – an in-school programme supported by Sport Bay of Plenty and Squash Bay of Plenty. Held at Tauranga Intermediate School for Year 5-8 students, Top Shots provided a fun introduction to squash skills by NZ top seed Joelle King and other international athletes and helped to promote squash and drive increased participation in the sport at a younger age. Squash BOP donated all necessary equipment and resources to the school for future physical education sessions.

30.     Eves Tennis International World Tennis Tour, which hosted over 120 athletes with 4,500 spectators, was held from 17 to 23 December in Pāpāmoa. Sponsored by Council, this event featured the official NZ Wheelchair Tennis Championships, showcasing top-level competition.

The event also included a new initiative for 2023 - a have-a-go Wheelchair Tennis session, promoting inclusivity for local wheelchair users and integration of the official NZ Wheelchair Tennis Championships into the event. An official World Tennis Tour school holiday programme for local children was also offered, including organised coaching sessions on the outer courts and coaching tips from pro players. Players were welcomed with a Mihi Whakatau from mana whenua Ngā Potiki.

31.     Large scale earthworks have been undertaken at Gordon Spratt Reserve to upgrade the sportsfields. Work has involved upgrading 4 ha. of soil profile, installing irrigation, and growing a couch grass surface.

      

32.     As part of the Kopurererua Valley Stream realignment project, the new cycleways have been chip sealed to make it easier to cycle or push prams through the reserve and admire the picturesque views of the new river alignment and native fauna and flora. This marks 85% of project completion and we expect the northern alignment to be completed and stream livening to be undertaken in April/May.

A road leading to a field

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33.     At Caslani Reserve in The Lakes, one of the redundant pergolas has been removed and the remaining two have been repurposed with shade and two monster picnic tables, one of which is accessible. A new barbecue has been installed adjacent to new picnic area, with new concrete connections throughout.

A picnic area with benches and a covered walkway

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34.     An upgrading programme has been undertaken at Tutarawananga/Yatton Park. The pathway under the trees at the eastern end of the reserve has a new asphalt layer and provides new connections to the track leading to the Waimapu Estuary walkway. A new accessible concrete path connects the main driveway to the barbecue, toilet and play area. The main driveway and parking area has also been resurfaced and includes two disabled parking bays and a raised entrance crossing. At the main entrance, a new sign has been installed to reflect the dual naming of park.

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35.     Two new members have been appointed to the Creative Communities Scheme assessment panel to fill industry knowledge gaps in the visual arts and film - Monique Barnett (Associate Curator at Tauranga Art Gallery) and Sharon Menzies (Chair of Film BOP).

Tauranga Taurikura – A city that values, protects and enhances our environment

36.     The end of 2023 saw the completion of a number of projects as part of the delivery of the Mauao Placemaking project. In the last quarter of 2023, the following work was completed:

·    Awaiti viewing platform - Te Awaiti is the name for the small stretch of water between Mauao and the large ocean side rock formation - creating a small river of sea water in close proximity to Te Toka a Tirikawa. The sheltered nature of this strip of water lent itself to the short-term anchoring of Waka. The elevated deck structure was completed before Christmas and captures a vista of these features. The seating on the deck provides a rest point for users of the base track. The Port of Tauranga contributed funding to the platform construction, and this was opened before the Christmas break for users of Mauao to enjoy.

          

·    Lower Summit (northern landing) - The lower summit signifies the area of Mai i Ngā Kuri a Whārei Ki Tihirau – the land formation and coastline of this region from Bowentown to the East Cape. The name denotes the coastline’s significance and encapsulates all Iwi that affiliate to Mauao. The curved seating is designed to orientate Mauao and its viewers to this wider environmental context.

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·    Waipatukakahu – The Waipatukakahu project follows the revitalisation and beautification which restores the mauri (life force) of the stream. This includes interpretation signage highlighting the story and restoration of rocks from other areas of Mauao to formalise and protect the stream. A seat has been installed to appreciate the area and act as a rest stop for those using the base track.

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·    Hukitawatawa (amphitheatre by water tank) - This area has been shaped to create an amphitheatre feature, providing a useful area for seating larger groups of people. The area will remain closed over summer while grass establishes.

37.     Te Rere Omanawa was officially opened to the public in early-December with a blessing onsite to mark the completion of the track work. This is a significant milestone, providing the community with the ability to view the falls safely.

A person standing next to a stone

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38.     As part of the establishment of the City Operations Team, a huge emphasis has been placed on training, particularly in health and safety but also on technical skills required (e.g. pest plant identification).

Some of the crew worked through the holiday period to ensure we could maintain our level of service, and the entire crew returned to work on 8 January. This provided an opportunity to provide refresher training at the new Tauriko Depot, via six 30-minute training modules covering topics such as Hazardous Substances Spill, EROAD Inspect and Pre-start Checks for Trucks, Pest Plant ID & Working Around Diseased Trees, Traffic Management Theory (mock-ups on two TMP scenarios),  and poisonous plants/thorns/spikes awareness. This finished with a Council Business Conduct module and individual goal setting for the year.

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Tauranga - Tātai Whenua – A well-planned city

39.     On Wednesday 17 January, a blessing in preparation for the commencement of construction was held on the Library Community Hub site. Representatives from Otamataha Trust, Commissioners, Council staff and the construction company were present.  

40.     A process to develop the Council’s Youth Engagement Framework has begun, with the aim of aligning this with our Tauranga Mataranui – Inclusive City Strategy and the Ministry of Youth Development’s refreshed 2023 National Youth Plan. This will replace the Tauranga City Council 2016 Youth Engagement Plan and 2019-2021 Youth Action Plan.

41.     Our Rangatahi Advisor represented Council at the final Piritahi Youth Collective hui for 2023, connecting with 15 youth stakeholders at the Rangiora Health Hub, a community-led healthcare service run by Ngāti Ranginui Iwi and provided for continued discussion on the youth aspirations identified in the Youth Hub Feasibility study. 

42.     The Emergency Management team has been working closely with staff from Bay Venues Limited (BVL) to assess venues and locations across the city that may be utilised during an emergency response. The result will be a formalised agreement that allows Emergency Management to utilise any BVL facility across the city as a Civil Defence Centre, information hub or goods distribution point. By having a working relationship with BVL, the team will be better-prepared to respond and assist the community, should emergency shelter be required.

43.     In early-2024, the Emergency Management team will be stewarding work with partner agencies to determine how significant incidents which impact multiple agencies will be managed. This work will help create a Multi-Agency Response Framework for managing incidents in Tauranga, particularly within the Mount Industrial Zone. The aim of the project will be to develop, confirm and test the Response Framework as a living decision matrix that informs the decision-making process before, during and after a multi-agency response.

44.     Following the busiest calendar year on record for Baycourt, the venue will make the most of the traditionally quiet summer period to undertake some essential building and equipment maintenance projects. These include maintenance of the 100-year-old annual Wurlitzer organ and asbestos removal in the backstage areas, and commenced in early-January, with the final project to be completed by mid-March.

45.     December was a busy month at the Mount Beachside Holiday Park, setting a new revenue record of $416,912, up 11% compared to December 2022. Occupancy for December was 10,388, also up 11% compared to December 2022.

46.     Spaces & Places engagement staff teamed-up with Sport BOP and our Property Management team top successfully organise and deliver a series of events to inform user groups of the LTP. These sessions were crucial in keeping our sports field and leasing stakeholders in the loop about proposed changes, and gathering feedback.

Tauranga Ara Rau – A city that we can move around easily

47.     The Marine Parade Walkway was opened with a blessing and public event in December, in time for the holiday break. Many compliments were received over the break from walkway users. The walkway has seen the activation of the entire coastal fringe from Mount Drury right along Ocean Beach Road, with the coast being easier to access for a wide range of community members.

      

Tauranga a te kura – A city that supports business and education

48.     The STEMWana Robotics Tour was a fantastic opportunity for our library to showcase some of our digital and robotic equipment and advertise our new digital programmes. We are lucky to have a great relationship with the STEMWana Trust, who invited users to attend the Robotic and AI Summer Tour, held at Tauranga Boys College. Over 700 tickets were sold, and we spoke to hundreds of people during the two-hour event. STEMWana Trust aims to inspire a new generation of scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians.

   

49.     Libraries have launched Fiero Code, a self-guided online software programme for ages eight and above, offering a gamified learning experience. Using Fiero, library customers can learn how to build websites, video games, phone apps, animations and more in multiple coding languages. While the platform is designed to allow users to learn at home, it is intended that Fiero will be incorporated into other library programmes and events throughout the year.

50.     Libraries are pleased to work alongside EmployNZ again in 2024, providing a CV and career advice drop-in service. There has been an increased demand for a service that provides expert advice on CVs, job application cover letters, interviews and general employment questions. EmployNZ will resume this drop-in service in February and rotate around all community libraries each week.

51.     Pae Korokī: Tauranga Archives Online now has a Facebook page for the community to explore, discover and contribute to the rich and diverse stories of our people and our place. Available at facebook.com/paekoroki, the page is managed by the Library’s Heritage & Research team who share favourite items and interesting information from our collections.

A screenshot of a social media post

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52.     Following the manaakitanga shown in opening their doors and providing emergency shelter during Cyclone Gabrielle, staff from the Community Development, Emergency Management and Takawaenga teams met with five marae to express gratitude on behalf of Council. The team also discussed ways in which Council can help marae to continue to support their whānau and communities and enhance their marae preparedness. As an outcome of these discussions, grants were provided to the following marae:

Funding for the grants came from an underspend in the community grants (capital projects) budget in the 2022/23 year. Huria Marae also raised concerns about crime in its area. The Tauranga Transport Operations Centre (TTOC) installed a surveillance camera at the Sutherland Road/ Judea Road intersection at the marae’s request.

Staff will also continue to support each marae with emergency planning and securing additional external funding pathways. 

53.     The Venues and Events Marketing Communications team ran a Christmas shopping campaign for The Historic Village retail tenants, based around gifts under $20, under $50, and over $50. A series of videos were created for each advertisement, generating significant online engagement and traction. The campaign received an incredible 74,824 impressions and reached 20,164 people. This resulted in an awareness boost for The Historic Village retailers coming into the Christmas season. The Christmas focus continued with A Christmas Night Market attended by over 800 people on Thursday 14 December, run in collaboration with The Incubator. 

54.     In Quarter two of the financial year, the Hands on Tauranga education programme loaned 177 objects to schools, while 1,131 students participated in outreach programmes delivered by our Museum Educator.

55.     The number of museum objects on the Tauranga Heritage Collection’s website continues to grow. Over 16,000 objects can now be explored, each with stunning imagery to be shared and utilised by local communities and visitors from all over the world. Items recently uploaded include a relic from the HMS Orpheus and a core sample from the Kaimai Tunnel project, which opened in 1978.

Chief Financial Officer

Tauranga Airport

Airport Operations

56.     There were 2,770 flights operated by Air New Zealand during October, November and December, up from 2,702 in 2022, carrying 146,418 passengers compared to 136,391 passengers in 2022, a 74% increase. 

57.     Flights operated with an average loading of 91.5% during December, meaning many people wishing to travel by air are either not being able to travel at a time that suits, or are not able to travel by air at all. Airport management is continually in dialogue with Air NZ about the very high load factors, which is a problem being experienced across the regions. Air NZ does not have any more capacity to offer at this stage and probably not for the next two years due to a number of the jet fleet having to be out of service, four at a time, for urgent non-scheduled maintenance.

Airport Development

58.     Tauranga Airport took over the ownership and responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the Airport’s lighting, visual navigation aid and standby power systems on 1 December, the first of the regional airports to do so. This equipment is very old, in poor condition and obsolete, in that there are no longer parts available. We are three months into a 6-month total replacement project, which will see a significant improvement in lighting performance, allowing increased poor weather arrivals and departures.

59.     The new Fire Station project is on track for completion mid-March.

Finance

December a record month for payments

60.     Council’s business operations and capital delivery are continuing to increase with the December month recording our biggest payment outflows yet.  Total payments to suppliers, staff, contractors (excluding interest and property transactions) were $75m.  The average for the first five months of the financial year was $61m per month.  Forecasting both capex and opex continues to be of upmost importance to ensure optimal cashflow management and borrowing in the current interest rate environment.

Update on Revaluation

61.     In December, following receipt of revised revaluations, the Office of the Valuer General (OVG) issued an orange audit status, effectively pausing the revaluation. An orange status means that moderate to high levels of information or valuation review are required to meet the revaluation standard.

62.     Council has a final opportunity on 23 February to submit a revised file for assessment by the Office of the Valuer General. If the values meet the required standards set by the OVG, certification of the revaluation could be achieved by 15 March 2024 and these values could be loaded into our system and used for rating in the 2024-25 rating year.  If the revaluation data is not certified, then we would remain on our existing three-year timeframe and would redo the revaluation for the 2024-25 year.

63.     We will continue to update our revaluation web page to keep ratepayers informed about the revaluation.

Strategy, Growth & Governance

Governance & Democracy Services

Election – 20 July 2024

64.     Prior to the 2023 General Elections, the former Minister of Local Government announced that the next local government election in Tauranga would be held on Saturday, 20 July 2024 and a decision was also made to postpone the 2025 Tauranga City triennial election until 2028.

65.     For this election, Tauranga City Council will have a new representation arrangement. Tauranga residents will elect nine councillors plus a mayor. Eight of the nine councillors will be from general wards, and one councillor will represent the new Māori ward, Te Awanui. The eight general wards are: Mauao/Mount Maunganui, Arataki, Pāpāmoa, Welcome Bay, Matua-Otūmoetai, Bethlehem, Tauriko and Te Papa. Te Awanui will cover the entire city.

66.     Nominations will open on 26 April 2024 and close at 12 noon on 24 May 2024.  Voting papers will be delivered from Saturday, 29 June 2024 and voting closes on Saturday, 20 July 2024 at 12 noon.

67.     A separate report on the order of candidate names for the voting documents is included on the agenda.

Candidate Information Evening

68.     In the terms of reference set by the Minister of Local Government, the Commissioners are required ‘to work with the Council to encourage quality candidates to stand for election.’

69.     To help prepare people interested in standing as elected members, Council will host a free candidate information evening on Monday, 19 February, from 4-8pm at the Holy Trinity Church Hall, Devonport Road, Tauranga. The Commissioners, a governance expert, our Electoral Officer, and past and present councillors from other councils will take part. The evening will be an informative session to prepare would-be candidates for what they may expect if elected.

70.     Further information on the election and how to register for the candidate information evening is available on the election webpage
https://www.tauranga.govt.nz/council/about-your-council/elections-2024

Takawaenga

71.     National Māori response to the new government – the Māori king called for a national hui in Turangawaewae. This was a positive hui with several workshops covering constitution, environment, te reo, youth perspectives and other matters. There was a strong turnout and contrary to media and mainstream assumptions, the discussions focused on proactive and constructive discussion. We will keep connected to the subsequent discussions to understand opportunities to continue positive tangata whenua relations in Tauranga. One possibility is that Tauranga iwi may go to Waitangi, thereby limiting Waitangi Day attendance locally.

72.     Te Rangapu Mana Whenua o Tauranga Moana has reconvened for 2024, starting with a review of the last year and a high-level look at the coming year. Overall themes were that there continue to be steady progress with actions and relationships, but tangata whenua will need to continue to monitor and support good practice. The elections in July were a key topic for Te Rangapu, with tangata whenua keen to ensure candidates who are open-minded and inclusive are supported through information and promotion. In particular, they discussed the value of Māori perspectives directly at the decision-making table, Māori contributions to housing solutions and sharing tangata whenua stories to build character across Tauranga.

Corporate Services

Performance, Monitoring & Assurance

73.     Performance and Assurance is a newly-formed team comprising CPAD, Business Insights & GIS.  One of its early priorities will be to assist with the inclusion of performance measurement components of future Executive reports.

74.     The team completed its first series of quarterly project health checks, in collaboration with internal audit. A summary of these findings is available in the recent internal audit report.

75.     The team continues to enhance our project reporting capability, with project charters next in line to move to our digital platform CARTA.

76.     The Business Insights team has deployed a financial performance dashboard for staff to connect with financial reporting, along with the ability drill-down into the appropriate detail.

77.     A transportation insights portal has been deployed, which gives an overview of transport-related information in one place. The team is also working with GIS to deploy dashboards that show future projects and works on a map, enhancing coordination and providing an overview of work happening in our city.

 

 

 

78.     The GIS migration to Amazon Web Services (AWS) is progressing well. The team is currently focusing on migrating core applications Mapi and Smartzoom to AWS. Additionally, the team is supporting the finance team with REVAL 2024.

79.     An exciting opportunity to improve the way we capture assets is being trialled with the GIS Survey Team at Sulphur Point. This involves scanning the inside of buildings.

80.     Here is an example of a high-definition scan from the Oropi water treatment plant. Each object within the image can be captured as an asset, saving a significant amount of time. The whole of the Oropi facility has been scanned, including the reservoirs and intake. 10,700,000,000 data points were captured in the treatment plant area alone.

81.     This scan highlights just the data points within the image. Points are measured three-dimensionally, improving accuracy and efficiency.

People, Performance & Culture, Health & Safety

82. Human Resources and Learning and Development

83.     MyTeamPulse dates are scheduled as follows: Monday 26 February, Monday 17 June and Monday 16 September.

84.     The 2024 learning and development calendar is being finalised and will include people leader refresher sessions and a performance management course.

85.     We have approx. 50 vacancies, with 33 almost filled. We have several senior leadership positions to fill in the transport, digital and city planning and growth space where we continue to receive strong interest in the market, utilising the tools such as LinkedIN.

86.     Staff turnover remains stable at 12.6 percent.

87.     Planning is underway for the next cadet intake and the Taituarā Australasian Management Challenge.

88.     A technical issue with SuccessFactors occurred on 17 January, which unfortunately meant a small number of our staff were not paid their additional payments (such as on call, overtime, or holiday entitlements) over and above their normal fortnightly pay.  The team communicated directly with affected staff and their people leaders, and the correct payments will be made within the next pay cycle.

89.     90 Devonport Road – Executive and Senior Leadership Group workshops have been scheduled for January, February, and March to collate feedback on ways of working and office spaces.

90.     The team is now planning for the next scheduled phase of SuccessFactors: Recruitment, Learning & Development and Workforce Planning modules.

91. Health, Safety and Wellbeing

92.     40 safety incidents were reported in December.  Key event categories were: Assault (verbal/ physical) or antisocial behaviour; Fall/trip/slip (on same level) and roading related – traffic management.

93.     There were no significant safety events reported within this period.

94.     Understanding menopause workshops were run in December as part of the wellbeing programme. Over 500 staff attended.

95.     200 staff attended Contractor Management and Risk Management training in November and December.

96.     The Drug & Alcohol Policy people leader session took place in December. Considerable feedback was received, mostly positive.

Digital Services

Payment Kiosks

97.     Digital Services worked with the Customer Services and Library Teams to develop, install and trial two payment kiosks. While focusing initially on payments, the intention is to broaden the use of the kiosks in the future to include other types of council transactions (bookings, online forms etc.), digital signage and, potentially, ticketing. 

98.     The new kiosks, located at He Puna Manawa and the Mount Hub, enable customers to use a  touch screen to self-serve and make payment of property and water rates, dog registration fees, parking infringements, library fines, and sundry payments.

99.     Payments can be made via the Eftpos terminal attached to the kiosk, with a digital receipt emailed to the customer upon completion.

SAM for Compliance

100.   At the end of 2022, we implemented a Cybersecurity Compliance Management tool to track and compare ourselves against security standards and frameworks, and with other local government entities. Over the course of 2023, we have used the tool to assess, manage, and track security requirements, which has significantly increased our security posture. In fact, we did so well Tauranga City Council received the Most Improved in Cybersecurity award at the 2023 ALGIM awards.

Community Relations

Social Media

101.   Several online posts received high levels of engagement in December including:

·    Opening the Marine Parade Coastal pathway – 109,000 audience reach/7,700 post engagement, with 345 comments & 98% positive reactions

·    Opening the new viewing platform overlooking Te Awaiti on Mauao – 77,000 audience reach/5,300 post engagement, with 195 comments & 98% positive reactions.

102.   Paid Posts – Facebook / Instagram - High impressions and engagement:

103.   Long-term Plan campaign - November / December 2023 - reach: 158,000.

Mainstream media

104.   The Media Impact Score for November was 2.0, which is largely consistent with results over the year.

 

105.   Leading topics covered included the city centre transformation, transport and governance, with positive sentiment outweighing negative and neutral in the reporting.

 

Legal, Risk & Procurement

106.   A council cross-functional team sought approval via a business case to extend the duration of the Roading Maintenance Contract with Fulton Hogan. NZTA Waka Kotahi has granted an extension to our Roading Maintenance Contract for a period of approximately 9 years.

107.   The maximum contract term for a Term Services Contract is usually 5 years. However, as a result of improvements to our contracting and procurement processes, Waka Kotahi has for the first time granted an extension of this nature.

Risk

108.   The Risk Team, with help from Digital Services, has successfully implemented the Camms Risk Management software system. The system is now being used by the team and will be rolled-out to the wider organisation in the coming months. Reports to the Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee will change based on richer data and insights available.

 

 

Regulatory and Compliance

Building Consents

109.   We received 182 and 161 Building Consent and Amendment applications in November and December respectively, for a total of 1098 applications YTD. While November is consistent with the average volumes received in the past 12 months, December is slightly down. The YTD figure is 9% less than the same period in 2022, but roughly a third less than 2019 – 2021. This reduced volume of incoming applications has certainly assisted with reducing the backlog of consents.

 

 

110.   We granted 158 and 126 consents and amendments in November and December respectively, for a total of 1039 YTD. The volume of consents granted is also down compared with previous years, reflecting the reduced number of applications received. We also refused 20 applications in November and 5 in December for a total of 52 applications refused YTD.

111.   The proportion of consents granted within statutory timeframes significantly increased, , with 80% of consents and amendments being issued within 20 working days in November and 85% in December. We have implemented a number of process changes and are working on others to help improve this further. As part of this concerted effort to get applications out before day 20, we have also focused on addressing older consents. We had 94 applications in progress that were already over day 20 at the start of October. By the end of December that had reduced, with only 30 of those applications remaining in progress. Further, looking at the consents granted in November and December that were received in the three months prior to granting, 95% of these were granted within statutory timeframes in November and 93% in December. These figures are significantly up on previous results.

 

112.   Inspection wait times for standard (45-minute) inspections have remained low, generally around 24 hours, whereas for our most complex inspection types (for instance R3 Finals), the lead time was around 3 or 4 days for most of November and December. Inspection numbers remain roughly 20% down on previous years, with around 400 inspections completed most weeks. Because wait times are low, there is reduced demand for our remote and weekend inspections.

113.   We issued 147 and 151 code compliance certificates (CCCs) in November and December respectively, for a total of 901 YTD. The CCCs issued related to the construction of 62 new residential units in November and a further 49 in December. Our compliance with statutory timeframes has remained consistently high, with 98% being issued within 20 working days in November and December.

 

114.   The number of new dwellings consented, as well as new dwellings being issued Code Compliance Certificates (a proxy for new dwellings actually built), fell short of SmartGrowth’s housing demand projections for 2023.This is to be expected, given the market conditions over the last year. The lower than average number of consents issued in 2023 is Also likely to have an impact on the number new dwellings built in 2024.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

115.   At the time of writing this report in mid-January, we had cleared the majority of the non-compliances raised in our IANZ assessment in October. We are on track to have the last two cleared well within the required timeframes.

Building Compliance

116.   Our summer pool safety campaign began in December, as we know pool suppliers start stocking above-ground/temporary pools for the warmer months, and they are often a popular family gift at Christmas. Our key message has been “Stay cool, but fence the pool”. Temporary pools have the same fencing requirements as more permanent pools and clearly pose a significant risk, as they’re often put in backyards for tamariki to enjoy.

117.   Throughout December and January, we targeted families, swimmers and pool suppliers to educate them about compliance and ensure preventable drownings are avoided. We reached the community through Facebook advertising, Google Adwords and a media release. We also updated the information available on our website and had a webtile on the homepage to take interested customers directly to the information. We have also shared information and brochures with pool suppliers so they can have them available at their front counters and on shelves near their pool supplies.

 

Environmental Regulation

Alcohol Licensing

118.   Between the 21 November and the end of December, the Alcohol Licensing Team forwarded 117 various alcohol licensing applications to the District Licensing Committee for consideration and determination. A breakdown of the applications is provided in the table below:

Applications forward to the District Licensing Committee

 

Application Type

Number

YTD

OFF Licence (New)

 

2

OFF Licence (Renewal)

2

18

ON Licence (New)

4

17

ON Licence (Renewal)

1

46

Club Licence (New)

 

 

Club Licence (Renewal)

 

8

Temporary Authorities (ON & OFF)

3

23

Manager (New)

31

180

Manager (Renewal)

22

121

Special Licence

54

273

Total:

117

688

 

119.   The team also completed 17 premises inspections in this period, ensuring that licensed premises were being operated and managed as required by legislation.  Year-to-date, the team has inspected 101 licensed premises. These inspections are both scheduled and unscheduled. Scheduled inspection are undertaken upon receipt of an application, while unscheduled inspections are conducted when a compliance issue has been identified.

Enforcement

 

Number

YTD

Infringements

6

10

ARLA Suspensions

2

6

ARLA Cancellations

0

0

Total:

8

16

 

120.   Two infringement notices were issued to licensed premises for having no duty manager present onsite during a premises visit. This is in direct contravention to the conditions of the alcohol licence.

121.   On 22 November, we conducted a Controlled Purchase Operation (CPO) with Police and two underage volunteers, who attempted to purchase alcohol from 27 OFF Licence premises. There was one failure where a minor was able to purchase alcohol. Subsequently the Alcohol Licensing Inspector has applied to the Alcohol Regulatory Licensing Authority (ARLA) for a suspension of the premises’ OFF Licence and suspension of a Duty Manager’s Certificate.

122.   This is the second controlled purchase operation held over the last six months where OFF Licence premises have sold to persons under the age of 18.

District Licensing Committee Hearings Held

 

Number

YTD

On Licence

 

6

Off Licence

1

3

Club Licence

 

 

Manager

 

7

Temporary Authority

 

3

Special Licence

 

 

Total

 

19

 

123.   During the latest period, one application was referred to hearing for determination by the District Licensing Committee (DLC). This licence was for a new OFF Licence grocery store in Mount Maunganui called Four Square Mount Maunganui.

124.   Over the Christmas break, Alcohol Licensing Inspectors monitored three large music events. Generally, these events were well-managed by the licensees, but some attendees required medical assistance at all three events, due to being affected by either alcohol or drugs. The biggest event for Tauranga this year looks to be the two day “One Love” music festival, where it is estimated that between 10,000 and 15,000 people will attend. Alcohol Licensing Inspectors monitored that event as well on 27 and 28 January.

             

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juicy Fest                                        Bay Dreams                              Summers Day Live

 

Environmental Health

125.   82 verifications of food businesses were undertaken between 21 November and 31 December, with 334 so far this financial year. Of the 334 verifications conducted year-to-date, 11 received an ‘unacceptable outcome’.

126.   An unacceptable outcome means that the business had a number of non-compliances that need to be resolved, and the business’s verification frequency will increase until compliance improves. When a food business receives an unacceptable outcome, it must gain two acceptable outcomes before its verification frequency can be decreased.

127.   Registrations and service requests are set out below.

Registrations

21 Nov to 31 December 2023

YTD

 

Food Registrations - New

19

132

 

Food Registrations - Renew

38

372

 

 

Health Registrations – New

1

6

 

Health Registrations - Renew

1

150

These generally renewed August, September, October

 

Service Requests (complaints, queries etc)

1 October to 20 November

YTD

 

Food safety and suitability enquiries, complaints, investigation and enforcement

6

33

33 total investigations resulting in 11 enforcement interventions

Customer queries

8

41

 

Health registration

0

5

 

Hairdressers

0

4

 

Housing

1

2

 

Health miscellaneous

3

10

 

Food registrations

11

99

 

Compliments (on service)

0

3

 

TOTAL:

 

197

 

 

Animal Services

128.   Actions taken in relation to Animal Services complaints received for December 2023 and Year to Date are listed below.

 

 

Warnings / Notices

Abatement Notices

Dangerous Menacing Classifications

Infringements Issued

Prosecutions Commenced

Dec-23

Barking - 30

 

Dangerous - 0

 

 

Roaming - 26

0

Menacing - 5

74

1

Aggression - 10

 

Section 62 Muzzle - 4

 

 

YTD

Barking 208

 

Dangerous - 1

 

 

Roaming 89

15

Menacing - 11

566

3

Aggression 27

 

Section 62 Muzzle - 14

 

 

 

129.   The number of registered dogs has increased by 513 compared to 31 December 2022. We are projected to exceed 16,000 known dogs in the city by 30 June. As at 31 December, 95.7% of all known dogs have been registered (an increase from 93.7% in 2022).

130.   As Christmas approached, we postponed actively following-up on unregistered dogs and focused on preparing for the influx of Christmas visitors. New signage was installed to assist residents and visitors understand the obligations relating to dogs at the Mount.

 

 

131.   During December, we received a report of two goats being kept on a residential section, in contravention of our ‘Keeping of Animals’ Bylaw, and causing issues for surrounding neighbours. The bylaw is made pursuant to the Local Government Act and while it is not legal to keep goats, our only option where an owner is reluctant to comply is to execute a search warrant (with Police) and prosecute. We negotiated with the goat owner, who finally surrendered them to Council, and the goats were rehomed to an animal rescue centre. Unfortunately, matters like this take a lot of time and highlight the inadequacies of some of the legislation we operate under.

132.   The Animal Services Facebook page likes are continually growing and reaching the dog owner community with messages and information. In December, we put together some videos to share on the page, to get some of our key messaging across in a lighthearted way. All three videos were received very well, with 4.6k minutes viewed and 48.7k initial plays. 83.7% or 3,860 viewers were non-followers of the page, helping to grow our reach to over 100,000 people in December.

Parking and Bylaws

133.   Our Parking Officers have worked hard over the summer to assist the public. In one instance, a four-year-old boy was seen wandering along the middle of the road near Greerton Pools. The boy was autistic and couldn’t talk to the officers, but they gently guided him off the roadway and kept him safe until a very worried mother arrived shortly afterwards. On another occasion, two young women found themselves with vehicle issues on a busy section of Cameron Road. The officers quickly secured the area, isolating the vehicle and, after an inspection of the battery, managed to get the occupants back on their way.

134.   During November and December, we received 419 parking complaints, compared to 375 this time last year, and 195 Bylaws complaints compared to 68 this time last year, showing a continued increase in requests from the public.

135.   Following our successful application to secure Freedom Camping Transition Funding from MBIE, we have implemented additional education patrols, which run in the early-evening before enforcement patrols, with the aim of helping campers understand the bylaw and avoid infringements. A communication campaign is also underway, which includes radio and social media platforms targeting visitors and festival goers.

136.   Throughout December and January we reached out through Freedom Camping information flyers, a media release, digital ads and radio advertising aligned with popular events and public holidays.

137.   Our Bylaws Officers continue to engage with individuals experiencing homelessness at Cambridge Park. The people involved have been living in the reserve for over 12 months. Our staff have ensured they are aware of the social agencies they need to connect with for support. Options are being considered to facilitate the removal of these individuals and their vehicles as staff continue to work with Police to find a solution.

138.   Infringements to date are set out below:

 

 Nov – Dec 2023

 YTD

Bus Lanes

 1639

 6934

Parking

 9203

 28462

Freedom Camping

 202

 380

 

Environmental Planning

139.   365 applications for resource consents and other associated approvals have been received in the 2023/24 financial year to date. Application numbers are currently 16% higher than the same time in 2022/23.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

140.   In the 2023/24 financial year to date, Council has issued decisions in relation to 388 applications, 227 of which were for resource consents. Timeframe compliance for new applications (ie. applications received since 1 July 2023) is currently 84%.

141.   We have continued to progress a project to resolve outstanding consent applications, some of which date back several years, which is reflected by the fact that the number of decisions exceeds the number of applications across the same period.

142.   As a result of ongoing process improvements, time spent processing resource consents is now being much more accurately captured. This is an important step, as planning services operate on a “user pays” basis. However, the resulting increase in costs has also resulted in an increase in the number of objections to fees and charges for resource consents. We will be engaging with the sector to provide further clarity on the charges and the reasons for increases.

143.   In the financial year to date, we have conducted development contribution assessments for 759 building consents, totalling $10.8 million in contributions, and 215 resource consents totalling $3.7 million in contributions.

Environmental Monitoring

144.   We have responded to 168 RMA incidents and monitored 465 resource consents in the financial year to date. The majority of RMA incidents continue to relate to earthworks and inadequate sediment controls, breaches of consent conditions, and businesses operating in residential and rural zones.

145.   A total of 2794 noise complaints have been received in the financial year to date, with 872 requiring a response.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

146.   We have observed a significant increase in noise complaints over the summer months, which is in-line with expectations.

147.   Matters of interest

·    A recent application for a housing development on Ridge St Otumoetai continues to draw significant interest from local residents, with concerns being raised in relation to density and character. The application is currently on hold and awaiting further information. A decision on notification remains outstanding, although, as noted in previous reports, we are proactively engaging with the community in order to keep them up to date on the process.

·    Council has received an application to develop a site on Hinau Road, constructing an eight-storey building with a proposed height of RL 34.0m, providing up to 65 residential apartments. Given the location and scale of the development, it is expected that this application will generate considerable public interest.

·    A notification decision is currently pending in relation to a resource consent application for the subdivision of a property on Hastings Road, Pyes Pa, in order to create 50 individual lots.

·    Council has recently granted a resource consent to subdivide and develop a site on Jonathan St, Brookfield, to provide for up to 73 residential properties, alongside related civil and infrastructure works.

·    The EPA has appointed a panel to consider Sanderson Group’s Pitau Road project, which has been referred via the COVID-19 Recovery (Fast-track Consenting) Act 2020, although the membership of the panel has not yet been made public.

City Development & Partnerships

City Partnerships

148.   We continue to recognise the incredibly generous contributions to various civic and community amenity projects from our external funders through channels such as invitations to open days, project web pages, media releases and progress updates (via reports and in-person visits to the build sites). 

149.   There is a focus on building a more cohesive strategic partnership approach with our key Gaming Trust funders, with a meeting coming up in the first quarter of 2024 where both Tauranga City Council and Bay Venues Limited will present on the key community facility projects taking place over the next three years, such as the Masterplans for Blake Park, BayPark and Tauranga Domains, and the Memorial Park Aquatics and Recreation Centre. 

150.   In December’s Executive Report, we noted that $4,908,217 of external funding has been granted in the last 12 months to Spaces and Places projects. For completeness, we have included in the list below external funding confirmed to date for other community facility and amenity projects across the city: 

Project 

Funder 

Amount 

Te Manawataki o Te Papa 

Department of Internal Affairs ‘Better Off’ Funding 

$12,100,000 

Te Manawataki o Te Papa 

TECT 

$21,000,000 

Destination skatepark zones 1 & 2 

TECT 

$1,023,000 

Destination skatepark zones 1 & 2 

Lotteries 

$528,847 

Destination skatepark zones 1 & 2 

NZCT 

$459,370 

Destination skatepark zones 1 & 2 

Project Tauranga 

$200,000 

Destination skatepark zones 3 & 4 

Grassroots Trust 

$250,000 

Destination skatepark zones 3 & 4  

The Lion Foundation  

$35,000 

Destination skatepark zones 3 & 4 

NZCT 

$200,000 

Marine Parade coastal pathway 

MBIE Tourism Infrastructure Fund 

$800,000 

Marine Parade coastal pathway 

Port of Tauranga 

$162,000 

Mauao viewing platform 

Port of Tauranga  

$150,000 

Living Seawall at The Strand 

Port of Tauranga 

$385,559 

Tauranga Art Gallery HVAC system 

Pub Charity Limited 

$200,000 

Merivale Community Centre (grant transfer) 

TECT 

$300,000 

Merivale Community Centre (grant transfer) 

Lottery 

$500,000 

Merivale Community Centre (grant transfer)  

BayTrust 

$300,000 

TOTAL 

 

$38,393,776 

 

151.   Board performance reviews for Bay Venues, Tourism Bay of Plenty and Tauranga Art Gallery Trust have been completed with GOVN365, and the reports will be presented to the 12 February Council meeting.  

152.   The draft Statements of Intent for 2024-2027 for Bay Venues, Tourism Bay of Plenty, Tauranga Art Gallery Trust, Te Manawataki o Te Papa Limited and Te Manawataki o Te Papa Charitable Trust have been received and will be presented, along with Council feedback, to the 12 February Council meeting. 

153.   The ‘Shapes of Summer’ activation has been well received by residents and visitors to our city centre. The ‘Summer in the City Centre’ events and activations campaign will run through to 30 June, evolving into more autumn and winter-friendly plans. 

154.   Mainstreet six-monthly reports are due on 31 January and will be presented to the Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee on 25 March. Completed Annual General Meeting documentation is available on the TCC website under the respective Mainstreet pages. 

155.   Our City Safety and Engagement Advisor has been supporting new colleagues in the Kāinga Tupu and Safe and Resilient Communities Advisor roles within the Community Development team, through introductions to the relevant community networks within the safety, wellbeing and engagement space. 

156.   Extremely positive feedback was received from our city centre partners and key stakeholders following the City Partners event held at the University of Waikato on 27 November 2023. Over a hundred people received an update on various city centre transformation projects from Commission Chair Anne Tolley and General Manager: City Development and Partnerships, Gareth Wallis.  

157.   Our City Partnerships Specialists continue to engage with city centre business owners, landlords and the Mainstreets to receive feedback, provide updates and respond to any concerns. 

158.   Priority One presented its annual report at the December Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee meeting. Priority One’s “Rooftop Series” of events over the coming months will showcase both commercial and civic developments in the city centre as part of the CBD Blueprint. 

Library and Community Hub 

159.   100% detailed design is due to be issued in late-January. The architectural consent will be lodged in early-February. Stage 2 of the demolition is now complete. 

160.   A blessing was held on site on 17 January and piling commenced the day after. 

A group of people standing in a gravel area

Description automatically generated

Karakia on 17 January.

Piling rig on site

Civic Whare / Exhibition Centre / Museum (CWEM) 

161.   Developed design documentation is currently under review for feedback into detailed design. The 100% detailed design is due on 30 May 2024. 

162.   Refinement of the façade resulting from value engineering work is now being incorporated in the developed design package.   

163.   We’re currently developing early procurement and enabling works packages for the project to mitigate supply chain risks, particularly relating to façade, structure and ground improvement works. 

Tauranga Art Gallery  

164.   100% detailed design was delivered in December for the original works package. The project team is now working with the Art Gallery to bring their critical asset management work into one comprehensive design and build package. 

165.   Fire and structure peer reviewers have been engaged and are currently undertaking a review of the design. 

The Strand Reserve  

166.   Tranche 1 of the seawall construction works has been completed and demolition of part of the dinghy boat ramp has commenced. We are awaiting a KiwiRail access permit to remove light poles situated within the car park but within the 5m rail reserve. Living seawall units will be retrospectively installed later in February. 

167.   100% developed design for the waterfront playground is due in early-February. The preliminary design cost estimate was received on 7 December and is currently being reviewed. The geotechnical report was also received on 7 December, with results confirming the foundation requirements. The RFP for the specialised feature tower and associated play equipment has been advertised on GETS and is due to close on 7 February.

Te Hononga ki Te Awanui (Harbour Link) Stage 1: Boardwalk and Underpass  

168.   The demolition of the existing boardwalk and construction of the temporary causeway is now complete. Construction of the southern abutment has now commenced, along with the installation of the temporary sheet piling. 

169.   Construction of the ceiling screen is at 90% of the final patina before the corten gets sealed and the LED lighting fitted. HEB is scheduled to install the supporting galvanised frame by mid-February, with corten panels scheduled to be installed in June. 

Underpass ceiling screen

Masonic Park 

170.   Site works are progressing well, with the removal of the old carpark asphalt and the Masonic Hotel cellar excavation both completed. Excavation of the transformer foundation and new services within the site boundary are currently in progress. Engagement with nearby food and beverage operators and Tauranga Art Gallery is continuing. 

171.   A works agreement with PowerCo for the transformer relocation was signed prior to Christmas. 

Masonic Park site progress

Dive Crescent Carpark  

172.   Construction of the southern carpark was completed prior to Christmas. 

173.   Approval was granted at the Council meeting on 11 December to upgrade the Railway boundary fencing from the northern carpark to the overbridge (by Trinity Wharf). Redundant skatepark fencing will form a part of the new boundary fence. Crossroads is scheduled to commence work in late-January/early-February 2024, with planting to commence when weather conditions become more favourable (end of April). 

Beacon Wharf  

174.   Work has commenced on the northern tip of the seawall. A smaller digger is being used to work around the remaining pohutukawa tree on the northern tip. 

175.   A building consent exemption has been lodged with the BCA for the abutment on the pontoon. The Resource Consent to move contaminated land off-site is due in early-February.  

90 Devonport Road (Civic Administration Building Fit-out)  

176.   Installation of the Level 5 floor was completed in January. Steel stud framing has been approved and ordered and the fit-out building consent has been lodged. 

177.   The tender for the fit-out works has been accepted and final contract conditions are being finalised. 

Elizabeth Street East/Tunks Reserve  

178.   This area was re-opened prior to Christmas, with practical completion issued at the end of January 2024. 

Tunks Reserve blessing held on 20 December 2023

 

Memorial Park Recreation Hub  

179.   Following the presentation of options to the Council meeting on 11 December 2023, we had confirmation to proceed with Option 2, which includes two additional waterslides for the aquatic centre, with indoor courts removed from the scope.  

180.   Architects have been instructed to proceed with preliminary design. Beca has been instructed to complete an engineering report to finalise concept design. 

181.   The procurement strategy is in development, which will guide procurement of investigation and early works packages. 

City Centre Foot Traffic Data 

182.   As part of the data sets we are collecting for the city centre, we are now able to share foot traffic data monitored at key points across the area. The bar graph below shows how many more people spent time in the city centre at the end of last year compared with the previous year.  The exception is at 90 Devonport Road, due to it being a construction site.  Once that building is complete, and over 1,000 Council staff are based there, we expect foot traffic at this site to increase considerably.

Foot traffic at city centre sites – November & December 2022 vs 2023


Source: Tauranga Transport Operations Centre, Tauranga City Council 

 

 

 

 160-176 Devonport Road Carpark  

183.   The three-month Civil Works contract to establish the car park commenced in January. This includes relocating the Masonic Park bus shelter and Midnight Sun artwork to this area, providing further amenity and cycle parking shelter.  

Communications and Engagement  

184.   We continue to share the journey of our city centre transformation with the wider community, using various channels such as media stories, social media, Weekly Bulletin, City News, the Council website and by utilising partner channels such as Downtown Tauranga and Priority One. Media coverage in December included: 

Tauranga, becoming a grown-up city’: On Friday, 22 December 2023, a Bay of Plenty Times online article was published about the city centre transformation followed by an article in the Weekend paper on Saturday, 23 December. 

 

 

 

Bay of Plenty Times Weekend paper article on city centre transformation 

 

Projects opening: We celebrated the opening of Tunks Reserve and the Dive Crescent carpark at the end of last year, with a media release and some social media posts, resulting in media coverage on SunLive on Friday, 22 December. 

Ngāti Kahu Hauora gifted pavers story: our story about the gifting of pavers to Ngāti Kahu Hauora was featured in SunLive on Thursday, 28 December. The gifted clay pavers were repurposed from the Wharf Street side of the Te Manawataki o Te Papa site. The pavers have made accessibility around the health services site easier.  

Blue sea sponge ‘Te Awanui’: our story on the safe relocation of the blue sea sponge from Beacon Wharf was featured on One News on Monday, 8 January. The blue sponge story also featured in SunLive here.  

185.   Communications and marketing activity for the ‘Summer in our city centre’ campaign continues. Along with promoting the regular free events taking place, our efforts in December were largely focused on the ‘Tauranga Moana Bomb Comp’ and the ‘Shapes of Summer’ light installations kicking off. All events have been well received by the community, helping to bring thousands of people into the city centre – as indicated in foot traffic data above. 

 

 

Poster and social media promotion of free city centre events taking place 

 

186.   Proactive face-to-face meetings and discussions with local businesses and key stakeholders continue, to give people updates on city centre transformation and to listen to any concerns. Presentations and city centre tours with various stakeholder groups also continue. 

 

Attachments

Nil

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

12        Discussion of late items


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

13        Public excluded session

Resolution to exclude the public

Recommendations

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

13.1 - Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 December 2023

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s7(2)(j) - The withholding of the information is necessary to prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.2 - Exemption from Open Competition - To direct procure the fitouts of City Operations vehicles

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

 

 

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

12 February 2024

 

14        Closing karakia



[1] The council resolutions made under the Traffic and Parking Bylaw are available in an attachment to the bylaw which can be viewed on the council website at https://www.tauranga.govt.nz/Portals/0/data/council/bylaws/files/traffic-parking-attachments.pdf.

[2] Section 3.2 NPS-UD

[3] Housing and Business Capacity Assessment 2022 Summary, SmartGrowth, April 2023.

[4] Change 6 to the RPS seeks to remove the urban limits currently mapped in the policy statement in favour of the responsive planning framework required through the NPS-UD. Decisions on change 6 have not been notified at this time.