AGENDA

 

Policy Committee Meeting

Tuesday, 11 February 2020

I hereby give notice that a Policy Committee Meeting will be held on:

Date:

Tuesday, 11 February 2020

Time:

9am

Location:

Tauranga City Council

Council Chambers

91 Willow Street

Tauranga

Please note that this meeting will be livestreamed and the recording will be publicly available on Tauranga City Council's website: www.tauranga.govt.nz.

Marty Grenfell

Chief Executive

 


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

Order Of Business

1          Apologies. 5

2          Public Forum.. 5

3          Acceptance of Late Items. 5

4          Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open. 5

5          Change to Order of Business. 5

6          Declaration of Conflicts of Interest 5

7          Business. 6

7.1            2020 Appointment of Trustees to Tauranga Art Gallery Trust 6

7.2            Amendment of Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy. 11

7.3            Approval of Elected Members' Expenses and Resources Policy 2020. 28

7.4            Standing Orders. 37

7.5            Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy. 115

7.6            Hearing of submissions on the draft Coastal Structures Policy. 142

8          Discussion of Late Items. 196

 

 


1            Apologies

2            Public Forum 

3            Acceptance of Late Items

4            Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open

5            Change to Order of Business

6            Declaration of Conflicts of Interest


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

7            Business

7.1         2020 Appointment of Trustees to Tauranga Art Gallery Trust

File Number:           A11114481

Author:                    Anne Blakeway, Manager: CCO Relationships and Governance

Authoriser:             Gareth Wallis, General Manager: Community Services

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       The purpose of this report is to approve the appointment process, panel and skills sought to fill two vacancies on the Tauranga Art Gallery Trust board.

Recommendations

That the Policy Committee:

(a)     Receives the 2020 Appointment of Trustees to Tauranga Art Gallery Trust report and attachment.

(b)     Initiates the process to recruit two new trustees to the Tauranga Art Gallery Trust Board for terms of three years, from 1 May 2020 to 30 April 2023.

(c)     Appoints the following to the appointment panel:

(i)      Peter Anderson, Chair for Tauranga Art Gallery Trust, or his nominee.

(ii)     Councillor Kelvin Clout and Councillor Tina Salisbury for Tauranga City Council (TCC).

(d)     Approves the appointment of Jo Bond as the independent appointment panel member.

(e)     Confirms the skills, knowledge and experience required for the two new Tauranga Art Gallery Trust trustee positions.

 

Executive Summary

2.       Three trustees will be retiring from the Tauranga Art Gallery Trust (TAGT) Board on 30 April. This will leave three vacancies on the Board, with an additional fourth vacancy remaining unfilled following the resignation of James McCarthy in June 2019.

3.       TAGT has provision in their Trust Deed for eight trustees. It is recommended that two vacancies are filled this round for three-year terms to 30 April 2023, as per the process outlined in the Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy, to enable good succession planning and allow TAGT to easily maintain the quorum of four.

Background

Legislative requirements for CCOs

4.       TAGT is a council-controlled organisation (CCO), operating within the powers conferred by its Trust Deed.

5.       Trustees are appointed by TCC under its Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy.

6.       The usual appointment as a director/trustee to a CCO is for a period of three years, with the appointment period expiring on 30 April.

TAGT succession planning

7.       There will be three vacancies on the TAGT Board, following the retirement of Peter Anderson (Chair), Judith Stanway (Deputy Chair) and Mary Stewart (Trustee) who have all completed two terms. An additional fourth vacancy remains unfilled following the resignation of James McCarthy in June 2019.

8.       The table below outlines TAGT’s current trustees, their commencement and review dates as well as the length of tenure at the date of the next review. Highlighted columns indicate positions to be replaced:

Name

Commencement

Next review

Length of tenure at review date

Vacancy

TBC

TBC

TBC

Peter Anderson (Chair)

1 April 2014

30 April 2020

6 years, 1 month

Judith Stanway (Deputy Chair)

1 April 2014

30 April 2020

6 years, 1 month

Mary Stewart

1 April 2014

30 April 2020

6 years, 1 month

Mark Wassung

1 May 2017

30 April 2021

4 years

Rebecca Graham

1 July 2015

30 April 2022

6 years, 10 months

Grant Neagle

1 May 2019

30 April 2022

3 years

Sylvia Willison

1 May 2019

30 April 2022

3 years

9.       Council’s Appointment of Directors policy states that: “to enable effective succession planning, Council will seek to balance the expiry dates of directors' terms to ensure that approximately one third of directors retire or are required to seek reappointment in any year. This may require appointments to be made for a mix of one, two and three years”.

10.     The outgoing TAGT Chair, Peter Anderson, has suggested that three vacancies are filled this round. However, to enable good succession planning it is recommended that two trustees are appointed this round. This also maintains consistency with the boards of TCC’s other CCOs, Bay Venues Limited and Tourism Bay of Plenty, which each have six board members. 

Appointment panel

11.     To fill the vacancies, an appointment panel will need to be established in accordance with section 4.4 of the Appointment of Directors Policy and would include the TAGT Chair, Peter Anderson, (or his nominee).

12.     It is recommended that Council appoints Councillors Kelvin Clout and Tina Salisbury to be TCC’s representatives on the appointment panel. Councillor Clout is a former member of the CCO working group and Councillor Salisbury is Deputy Chair of the Finance, Audit & Risk Committee, which is responsible for monitoring the CCO half yearly and annual reports.

13.     It is also recommended that Council approves the appointment of Jo Bond as the independent panel member on the appointment panel. Jo was a director of the Arts Festival for six years, where she helped develop and deliver the Festival’s strategic goals, including fundraising and prudent financial management. Jo also has governance experience from board roles with the National League of Festival Directors and the Crystal Palace.

Skills and experience sought

14.     The current TAGT Board composition (Attachment 1), along with guidance provided by the Board, indicates a requirement for the following skills and capabilities this appointment round:

·      Strong business and financial acumen to govern and lead the strategic direction of an art gallery with assets to the value of $9.8 million.

·      Communications, marketing and/or fundraising experience at a governance or strategic advisory level.

·      A strong interest and understanding of visual arts - locally and nationally – and ideally, expertise in art exhibition development and curation.

·      Links with the local arts community and education providers, as well as local and central government agencies associated with the visual arts.

·      An appreciation of the importance of the cultural history of New Zealand and of Tauranga Moana Tangata Whenua.

Strategic / Statutory Context

15.     The appointment of board members to CCOs is one of the most important roles Council has in governing its CCOs. One of the best ways to ensure that a CCO operates effectively is to appoint effective board members.

16.     The appointment of CCO board members is made in accordance with TCC’s Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy.

Financial Considerations

17.     Fees for the two new trustees are covered within TAGT’s budget for trustee remuneration. The recommendations support the effective and efficient operation of Tauranga Art Gallery Trust.

Legal Implications / Risks

18.     There are no legal considerations.

Consultation / Engagement

19.     No consultation or engagement is planned.

Significance

20.     In terms of TCC’s Significance and Engagement Policy, this decision is considered to be of low significance as it is consistent with adopted policy and established practice.

Next Steps

21.     If approved by Council, the appointment panel will be established and will commence recruitment for two new TAGT Board trustees.

22.     The panel will make their recommendations for appointment back to Council on 21 April.

Attachments

1.       Tauranga Art Gallery Trust Board Matrix, 1 May 2020 - A11115104   


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

TAGT Board Matrix  - current skills and capabilities

 

Rebecca Graham

Mark Wassung

Grant Neagle

Sylvia Willison

Skills and Experience:

· Associate in the commercial team at Cooney Lees Morgan.  

· Has law and arts history degrees from University of Otago and has worked as a commercial/finance solicitor for more than 10 years in NZ and UK.

· Passionate supporter of the arts and an active member of the Friends of Gallery.  

Skills and Experience:

· Registered Architect/ Urban Designer in Hamilton and Tauranga.

· NZ Institute of Architects representative on the Urban Design Panel Hamilton for 3 years.

· Trustee of Hamilton East Community Trust for 10 years.

· Experience working with different cultures, contexts and ages, while helping build innovation capability and financial sustainability.

 

Skills and Experience:

· Current Director of Ingham Mora, Tauranga.

· Former Director of PwC in Hamilton.

· Extensive experience in all aspects of financial, trust and taxation matters.

· Experience in strategic and business planning as they relate to commercial and not for profit entities. 

Skills and Experience:

· CEO of Huria Charitable Trust.

· Ngai Tamarawaho hapu and Ngati Ranginui Iwi.

· Current trustee on the Nga Hapu o Ngati Ranginui Settlement Trust, representing one of two hapu affiliations.

· Served on the BOP Polytechnic Council for six years and on the Poutiri Trust for six years.

Appointed 1 July 2015 to 30 April 2022

Appointed 1 May 2017 to 30 April 2021

Appointed 1 May 2019 to 30 April 2022

Appointed 1 May 2019 to 30 April 2022

 

 

Appointment process timeline

 

 Task

By When

Applications open

15 Feb 2020

Applications close

2 March 2020

Applications distributed to Appointment Panel for short-listing

Early March 2020

Short-list prepared

Early March 2020

Letters to candidates not short listed

Mid-March 2020

Interviews held and candidates evaluated

Mid-March 2020

Reference checks – TAGT Chair

Late March 2020

Final report with Appointment Panel recommendations to be with Council

31 March 2020

Council meeting to approve appointments (in confidential)

21 April 2020

Letter to successful applicants (and unsuccessful)

22 April 2020

Media release to go out

22 April 2020

Shareholders’ Induction

Early May 2020

 

 


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

7.2         Amendment of Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy

File Number:           A11143579

Author:                    Anne Blakeway, Manager: CCO Relationships and Governance

Authoriser:             Gareth Wallis, General Manager: Community Services

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       The purpose of this report is to propose two amendments to the Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy (2018), to ensure that the policy is practicable and fit for purpose.

Recommendations

That the Policy Committee:

(a)     Receives the Amendment of Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy Report.

(b)     Adopts the revised Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy (Attachment 1), including amendments to clauses 4.4 and 4.7, with immediate effect.

(c)     Delegates to the Chief Executive the authority to approve the skills, knowledge and experience sought for Council Organisation board appointments, along with the appointment panel composition, subject to consulting with the Mayor.

 

Executive Summary

2.       A revised Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy was approved by Council on 22 May 2018.

3.       It is suggested that further amendments are required to clauses 4.4 and 4.7 pertaining to the appointment process and the appointment of a chairperson.

4.       This will provide delegated authority to the Chief Executive to approve the skills, knowledge and experience required for Council Organisation (CO) board appointments, along with the appointment panel composition, subject to consulting with the Mayor.

5.       It will also enable Council and its Council Organisations to appoint a Chair from the current board, if there is one suitable, without the requirement to establish an appointment panel.

Background

6.       Following a full review of Tauranga City Council’s (TCC) Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy (DC92), a revised policy was approved by Council on 22 May 2018, effective immediately.

7.       The revised policy has been used to guide several CCO appointment processes since it came into effect. However, clauses 4.4 and 4.7 have proven to be quite onerous in their application.

8.       Currently, once a vacancy has been established, clause 4 requires that Council approve the list of skills, knowledge and experience sought for Council Organisation board appointments, along with the Appointment Panel composition.

9.       To enable the effective and efficient conduct of the Council’s business, it is recommended that Council provide delegated authority to the Chief Executive to approve the skills, knowledge and experience required, along with the appointment panel composition, subject to consulting with the Mayor.

10.     Currently, clause 4.7 requires that an appointment panel is established to appoint a new chair. Recent appointment processes have proven this step to be superfluous if there is a suitable candidate on the current board.

11.     It is therefore recommended that this requirement is removed if there is a suitable candidate on the current board.

If a suitable chair cannot be appointed from the current board for any reason, or there is more than one suitable candidate on the current board, an appointment panel would be established as per the Director Appointment Process in section 4.4.

12.     A revised policy, with the proposed tracked changes, is attached (Attachment 1).

Strategic / Statutory Context

13.     To enable the effective and efficient conduct of the Council’s business.

Options Analysis

Option 1 – Council adopts the revised policy

14.     It is recommended that Council adopts the revised Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy, including amendments to clauses 4.4 and 4.7 and the rationale for these, as outlined in the report.

Option 2 – Council does not adopt the revised policy

15.     Council may decide not to adopt the revised Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy, including amendments to clauses 4.4 and 4.7 and the rationale for these, as outlined in the report. However, this is not a recommended option as it would not enable the effective and efficient conduct of the Council’s business.

Financial Considerations

16.     There are no financial considerations.

Legal Implications / Risks

17.     There are no legal considerations.

18.     Council approval is required for all CCO board appointments (and reappointments), so there are no risk implications with either of these proposed amendments.

Consultation / Engagement

19.     No consultation or engagement is planned.

Significance

20.     In terms of TCC’s Significance and Engagement Policy, the receipt of this report and its recommendations is considered to be of low significance as it is consistent with established practice.

Next Steps

21.     Following Council approval and adoption of the revised policy, a copy of the policy will be distributed to each of TCC’s CCOs and made available on the TCC website.

A copy will also be sent to Western Bay of Plenty District Council, as joint shareholder of Tourism Bay of Plenty.

22.     It is not envisaged that any changes will need to be made to any CCO Trust Deeds and/or Constitution as a result of the revised policy, but staff will work with the chairs of the CCOs to ensure that this is the case.

It is acknowledged that the effective date of the policy may change if there are any amendments to be made.

Attachments

1.       Amendment of Appointment of Directors to Council Organisations Policy - tracked changes - February 2020 - A11177340   


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

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Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

7.3         Approval of Elected Members' Expenses and Resources Policy 2020

File Number:           A11026600

Author:                    Emma Joyce, Policy Analyst

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       To approve the Elected Members’ Expenses and Resources Policy 2020.

Recommendations

That the Policy Committee:

(a)     Approve councillors who participate in hearings being entitled to claim an allowance at a rate of $xx per hour for being a member of a hearings panel and $xx per hour for Chair of the panel.

(b)     Adopt the Elected Members’ Expenses and Resources Policy 2020 to replace the Elected Members’ Expenses and Resources Policy 2016.

 

Executive Summary

2.       The Remuneration Authority issues an annual determination setting out the remuneration, allowances, and expenses payable to Elected Members. Where Council has discretion over the allowance payable (for example, for travel expenses), this is outlined in Council’s Elected Members’ Expenses and Resources Policy (the policy). This report asks the Policy Committee (the Committee) to adopt a revised policy incorporating changes agreed at the November 2019 Committee meeting.

3.       The report also includes options regarding an allowance for councillors who are part of a hearings panel as the Committee’s preferred option in November, being to prohibit councillors claiming the allowance, is not permitted under the Local Government Members (2019/20) Determination 2019 (“the determination”).

Background

4.       At its November 2019 meeting, the Committee agreed to the following amendments to the policy;

·   Providing for payment of a childcare allowance to the maximum provided for in the determination

·   Allowing mileage claims only for travel outside the Tauranga City Council area

·   Confirming that the Mayor and Councillors cannot claim a travel time allowance

·   Allowing claims for ridesharing services as well as taxis

·   Adding the option of a $100 payment to the host when the Mayor or Councillors choose to stay in private accommodation

·   Acknowledging support for attendance at professional development as well as conferences

·   Confirming Councillors’ expense claims and attendance at professional development is approved by the Mayor or Chief Executive, and the Deputy Mayor or Chief Executive in the case of the Mayor

·   Noting that exceptions to the policy require approval of the Mayor and Chief Executive and the Deputy Mayor and Chief Executive in the case of the Mayor.

5.       These options have been incorporated into the appended draft policy (attachment one). Minor changes to the draft policy due to changes in job titles and clarifying parking availability at council offices are highlighted in the attached draft policy.

6.       At the November 2019 meeting, the Committee also agreed that Councillors could not claim an allowance for participating in a hearing panel. Subsequent advice from the Remuneration Authority is that Council does not have the discretion to deny this entitlement to individual Councillors. This report presents alternative options with regards to hearings panel payments.

Strategic / Statutory Context

7.       The policy is necessary to enable leadership of the city and ensure that the Mayor and Councillors are sufficiently supported to fulfil their roles. The determination outlines where individual councils have discretion over the allowance payable.

Options Analysis

Allowance for Hearings

8.       The determination provides for Councillors to claim an allowance for being part of a hearing. The allowance is up to $80 per hour, or $100 if the Councillor acts as chair. Clause 15(4) implies that the Mayor cannot receive an allowance for participating in a hearing. However, the authority’s Remuneration for Local Authorities guidance document states that exceptions can be made when there is a shortage of hearing commissioners or the hearing is likely to take a significant amount of time.

9.       At the November 2019 meeting, the Committee also agreed to include a provision in the policy that councillors cannot claim an allowance for participating in hearings. The Remuneration Authority has since advised that individual councils do not have discretion over whether Councillors can claim the entitlement. However, councils can decide to pay a lesser amount or a nominal figure. As an entitlement, Councillors can choose whether they wish to claim the allowance.

10.     The table below outlines options for referencing the hearings panel allowance in the draft policy.

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1.1

Add reference to policy that councillors can claim an entitlement of up to $xx for participating in a hearings panel

·    Potential reduction in required budget to remunerate councillors

·    Consistent with Remuneration Authority advice to include hearings allowances in expense policies

·    A decision to provide a nominal or small entitlement is likely more consistent with the November 2019 decision.

·    May not align with the maximum allowance in the determination.

1.2

Add reference to policy that councillors can claim entitlement of $80 per hour for being a member of a hearings panel and $100 per hour for Chair of the panel

·    Aligns with the determination’s maximum permissible allowance

·    Nil

1.3

Do not reference allowance in policy (panel members can still choose to claim if wanted)

·    Status quo

·    Inconsistent with Remuneration Authority advice that councils include their hearings fees in expense policies

Adoption of the Elected Members’ Expenses and Resources Policy 2020

11.     Subject to a decision on the issue of hearings payments, it is recommended that the committee adopts the Elected Members’ Expenses and Resources Policy 2020 as appended at attachment one. The policy will provide clarity on the allowances available to Elected Members. The disadvantage of not adopting the policy is that allowances do not reflect the most recent determination, or the decisions made at the November 2019 committee meeting.

Financial Considerations

12.     Subject to a decision on the hearings panel allowance, additional budget may need to be allocated to cover the costs of councillors participating in hearings on district plan changes. There are no other financial considerations arising from this report.

Legal Implications / Risks

13.     The policy clarifies allowances where the determination gives councils discretion over the allowance payable. There are no identified legal implications or risks in adopting the draft policy as attached.

Consultation / Engagement

14.     No consultation or engagement is required.

Significance

15.     This report is not significant as it recommends only minor amendments to an existing policy.

Next Steps

16.     The approved policy will be made available on the Council website.

Attachments

1.       Draft Elected Members' Expenses and Resources Policy 2019 - A10791375   


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

TAURANGA_CITY_LOGODRAFT Elected members’

expenses and resources POLICY

 

 

Policy type

City

Authorised by

Council

First adopted

20 December 2010

Minute reference

M10/84.2

Revisions/amendments

23 August 2011
30 October 2012
2 September 2013
9 May 2016
11 February 2020

Minute references

M11/62.4
M12/71.3
M13/56.4
M16/25.7
M
20/xx

Review date

Every three years following the local election or as required by the Local Government Members Determination.

 

1.       PURPOSE

1.1     To clarify the expenses and allowances Elected Members may claim in undertaking their role, particularly in those circumstances where the determination enables councils to exercise discretion in the allowances payable.

 

2.       SCOPE

2.1     This policy applies to all Elected Members of Tauranga City Council.

 

3.       Definitions

Term

Definition

Absence without leave

is a period of time when an elected member is not fulfilling their responsibilities as an elected member and is doing so without formal approval from the Mayor.

Actual

means as evidenced by the original receipt attached to the claim form.

Council business

means formal Council, committee meetings, workshops, seminars, statutory hearings, training courses, conferences, site visits, meetings with staff, meetings with community groups, meetings with members of the public and social activities where a member attends as a Council representative.

Determination

refers to the most recent Local Government Members Determination issued by the Remuneration Authority.

Expenses

means personal money spent by Elected Members whilst going about their official duties as Elected Members and includes mileage claims.

Expense rules

means the type of expenses that are able to be claimed because they have been approved by the Remuneration Authority.

Hearings

Has the same meaning as in the most recent Local Government Members Determination issued by the Remuneration Authority.

Leave of absence

is a period of time, approved by the Mayor, for which an elected member is on leave from the duties of being an elected member.

Personal communications

means any communication that does not represent the official view of Council.

Reasonable

means that it is within the amount specified by the policy or as deemed reasonable by the Mayor and Chief Executive

Remuneration Authority

is an independent body established under the Local Government Act 2002, part of whose responsibilities are to determine remuneration and expense rules for local authority members.

Resources

are goods and services normally used by Council to support its business, that are provided to Elected Members for their personal use to assist them in fulfilling their responsibilities as Elected Members.

Travel time allowance

means the current definition and rate determined by the Remuneration Authority

Vehicle mileage allowance

means the current definition and rate determined by the Remuneration Authority.

 

4.           Principles

4.1         Elected Members should be reimbursed for actual and reasonable expenses they incur in carrying out their official duties.

4.2         Reasonable resources should be made available to Elected Members to enable them to more efficiently carry out their responsibilities.

4.3         Reimbursement of expenses and use of resources apply only to Elected Members personally and only while they are acting in their official capacity as Elected Members.

4.4         Elected Members’ expense expenditure must have a justifiable business purpose, be moderate and conservative having regard to the circumstances, be made transparently and is appropriate in all respects.

5.           Policy Statement

5.1         What Expenses May be Claimed?

Travel

5.1.1      Travel expenditure and travel-related expenditure should be economical and efficient, having regard to purpose, distance, time, urgency, and personal health, security and safety considerations. All travel and related expenditure must have a clear business purpose.

5.1.2      The table below outlines the air travel and accommodation and meal expenses Elected Members may claim while carrying out their official roles and duties.

Expense type

Description

Air Travel

Where practical, air travel should be booked well ahead of the actual travel, so that expenditure is the most cost-effective possible. The lowest practically priced airfare is to be used for all journeys (domestic and other) unless there is at least five hours or more of uninterrupted flight duration, a heavy work schedule on arrival, or personal health, known health conditions, safety, or security reasons, where premium economy may be used.

International air travel paid for by Council must be authorised by resolution of Council.

Membership of any airline club is restricted to the Mayor.

Accommodation and meals

When it is necessary to stay away from home overnight on Council business, the actual and reasonable costs of accommodation, meals and parking (if not provided free by the accommodation provider) are paid for by Council.

If an Elected Member chooses to stay at private accommodation, a maximum allowance of $100.00 can be paid to the person who provided the accommodation.

Accommodation, meals and incidental expenditure must have a clear business purpose, be cost-effective, and take into consideration the following:

·         the geographic location of the accommodation relative to where the elected member(s)’ business is;

·         the standard of accommodation;

·         safety and security considerations;

·         that additional mileage or taxi expenses are not usually required. 

When meals do not form part of a “package”, they may be claimed on presentation of an actual and itemised receipt (not a credit card statement or photocopy). The following maximum limits for meals apply:

·         Breakfast - $25.00 (GST inclusive) per elected member per meal. Any costs over this limit are the responsibility of the individual.

·         Lunch - $25.00 (GST inclusive) per elected member per meal. Any costs over this limit are the responsibility of the individual. 

·         Dinner– $50.00 (GST inclusive) per elected member per meal.  Any costs over this limit are the responsibility of the individual. 

When meals are provided as part of a “package”, additional meal expenses cannot be claimed.

An Elected Member’s ability to claim any daily or overnight accommodation expenses ends at the conclusion of the conference/forum or when the elected member leaves the conference/forum.

Use of Private Vehicle

5.1.3      Elected Members may only claim for mileage when using their own vehicle to travel outside of the Tauranga City Council area to undertake Council business. All claims for mileage must also meet the criteria for eligible travel as defined in the determination.

5.1.4      Council will not pay for travel by private motor vehicle where travel by other means is more practical and cost-effective.

Use of taxis and ridesharing services

5.1.5      Taxis or ridesharing services may be used for Council business, instead of private vehicle or public transport, for the following reasons:

·        Work is past a reasonable hour;

·        Safety reasons;

·        When outside Tauranga on Council business if a taxi or ridesharing service is the most appropriate form of transport.

5.1.6      Costs must be paid for by the individual and will be reimbursed on presentation of actual receipts. 

Other travel allowances

5.1.7      Elected Members cannot claim a travel time allowance as travel time is considered to be a component of the remuneration for Elected Members.

5.1.8      Private travel before, during or at the end of travel paid for by Council is the responsibility of the individual and at no additional cost to Council. The cost of any stopover paid for by Council must have a clear business purpose and be pre-approved by the Mayor (or Deputy Mayor in the case of the Mayor) and Chief Executive.

5.1.9      The Remuneration Authority’s rules on the Mayoral car are to apply.

Childcare

5.1.10    An Elected Member is entitled to claim a childcare allowance on an annual basis, as per the determination rules, as a contribution towards expenses occurred by the member for childcare provided while the member is on Council business. The claim must set out the actual costs incurred and paid by the member and must include a receipt or other appropriate record of payment of the annual amount paid for the childcare services provided.

Hearings

5.1.11    Elected Members who participate in a hearing are entitled to claim a fee of up to $xx. As per the determination, a fee can be claimed for time taken to prepare for the hearing as well as the hearing itself.

 

5.2         What Expenses May Not be Claimed?

5.2.1      The following expenses are the responsibility of individual Elected Members and cannot be claimed:

·   Medical insurance

·   Staff discounts

·   Life insurance

·   Accident insurance

·   Income replacement insurance

·        Travel, meals, and all entertainment incurred by the Elected Member’s spouse or partner

·   Alcohol, including as part of meals and entertainment costs, and mini bars

·   Tips

·   Any fines (parking or traffic offences).

5.3       When Expenses May and May Not be Claimed

5.3.1    For the purpose of clarity, Elected Members may claim expenses approved by the Remuneration Authority, while carrying out council business, except those that:

·        are incurred before they are sworn in as members of Council, or after they officially leave office

·   are incurred while not acting in their official capacity

·        are incurred on a trip outside of the sub-region without specific approval from the Mayor or a standing committee prior to the travel

·   are incurred while on leave of absence

·   are incurred while absent without leave

·   are incurred while holding office illegally

·   are related to activities that are incidental to and not the main reason for a trip or event.

5.4       When Expenses Are Paid

5.4.1    Expenses claimed are to be paid monthly, to coincide with a payment of the Elected Member’s salary, provided an Elected Members’ Expenses Claim Form with receipts attached is received in sufficient time to be included in the normal process.

5.4.2    All claims must be made within 60 days of expenditure occurring with the aim to keep expenditure within the year in which it occurs and is budgeted for.

5.4.3    All expense claims, receipt of personal gifts, and Mayoral credit card expenses are published on Council’s website.

5.5       Use of Resources

5.5.1  The equipment requirements for Elected Members are deemed to be:

·        A phone (mobile and landline)

·        A laptop

·        A personal internet service

·        A compatible scanner and printer.

5.5.2    Elected Members are provided with a laptop and mobile phone for all Council-related work. Elected Members cannot claim an allowance for personal computer or personal mobile phone use.

5.5.3    Councillors may choose to be reimbursed for use of personal internet services and printer as per the current determination.

5.5.4    Elected Members may use the following internal services to a reasonable level as determined by the Chief Executive:

·        Word processing and secretarial services

·        Postage and external courier

·        GIS products

·        Property files

·        Photocopying

·        Information technology advice and assistance

·        Use of a PC in the Councillors’ Lounge

5.5.5    The above services, equipment or consumables are provided at no cost to Elected Members, to assist them in carrying out their official responsibilities and are available only:

·        when holding office

·        when not on leave of absence

·        when not absent without leave.

5.5.6    None of the above is to be used by Elected Members for non-Council business, electioneering purposes, personal communications to or through any communications medium or any communications associated with Council-run referenda.

5.6         Authorisation for Conferences or professional development - New Zealand and Overseas

5.6.1      Attendance by Elected Members at conferences or professional development training in New Zealand or overseas, at Council’s cost, is to be approved by the Mayor or Chief Executive. Attendance by the Mayor at conferences or professional development trainings will be approved by the Deputy Mayor or the Chief Executive.  

5.6.2      Following attendance at a conference, Elected Members must provide a monitoring report back to the relevant Council committee, including costs and a synopsis of the conference.

5.7       Car Parking

5.7.1    Allocated car parking adjacent to the Council offices at Willow Street is provided free of charge for Elected Members to use while on Council business.

5.7.2    An authorised sticker must be displayed on the front windscreen and the vehicle registration number be provided to Democracy Services.

5.8       Receipt of Gifts

5.8.1    Gifts over the value of $100.00 which have been presented to an Elected Member in the course of their duties and which are retained by an Elected Member personally must be recorded in the Elected Members’ gift register.

5.9       Exceptions

5.9.1    There may be exceptional circumstances, or disputes, regarding Elected Members expenses and resources which need to be dealt with on a case by case basis.  Such cases will be dealt with by the Mayor and Chief Executive, and any exceptions be reported back to Council. If the case concerns the Mayor, the case will be dealt with by the Deputy Mayor and Chief Executive.

6.       Relevant Delegations

6.1       The Chief Executive has delegated authority to implement this policy and to sub delegate their authority.

6.2       All claims made under this policy are to be made using the appropriate form and authorised by the Mayor and Chief Executive for the Manager: Democracy Services to administer.

6.3       All claims made under this policy by the Mayor are to be made using the appropriate form and authorised by the Deputy Mayor and one other elected member for the Manager: Democracy Services to administer.

7.       References and Relevant Legislation

7.1       The following are the relevant references and legislation:

·    The most current Local Government Elected Members (Certain Local Authorities) Determination.

·    Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, Section 6

·    Controlling Sensitive Expenditure – Guidelines for Public Entities (Controller And Auditor General).

 


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

7.4         Standing Orders

File Number:           A11126708

Author:                    Coral Hair, Manager: Democracy Services

Authoriser:             Susan Jamieson, General Manager: People & Engagement

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       The report provides an overview of the changes proposed to the Council’s Standing Orders as a result of legislative changes since 2016 and also identifies the optional clauses that require a decision. 

2.       A revised Standing Orders document is recommended to be adopted for the 2019-22 Triennium.

Recommendations

That the Policy Committee:

(a)     Receives the Standing Orders report

(b)     Recommends to the Council the adoption of the Standing Orders in Appendix 1 which includes:

(i)      Members’ and public deputations right to attend by audio- or audio-visual link (Standing Orders 13.7 to 13.16).

(ii)     Casting vote provision for the Mayor or Chairperson, or any other person presiding at a meeting (Standing Order 19.3)

(iii)     Option B (medium) as the default provision for speaking and moving motions. (Standing Order 22.1).

(iv)    Delegating to the Mayor the power to grant a leave of absence for Councillors in order to protect a members’ privacy (Standing Order 13.3) and a new definition of leave of absence.

(v)     Delegating to the Chief Executive during the election interregnum period the authority to make decisions on urgent matters that cannot wait until the first meeting of the new Council. (New Standing Order 6.6).

(vi)    Time limit on movers of motions when speaking to the motion is reduced from 10 minutes to 5 minutes (Standing Order 21.2)

(vii)   Adding that a procedural motion to close or adjourn debate can be taken after two speakers have spoken for the motion and two against or, in the chairperson’s opinion, it is reasonable to accept the closure motion (Standing Order 25.1).

 

 

Executive Summary

3.       The report summaries a number of ‘information only’ updates resulting from legislative changes since 2016. It also identifies the Standing Orders which the Council has discretion over and may wish to review the practice of the previous Council.   These are:

(a)     Members’ and public deputations right to attend by audio- or audio-visual link (Standing Orders 13.11-13.16)

(b)     A casting vote for the Mayor or Chairperson (Standing Order 19.3)

(c)     The choice of a default option for speaking and moving motions (Standing Orders 22.1-22.4)

(i)      Option A – formal

(ii)     Option B – medium

(iii)     Option C – informal

(d)     Delegating powers to the Mayor to grant a leave of absence (Standing Order 13.3)

(e)     Delegating decision making authority to the Chief Executive during the election interregnum period. (Standing Order 6.6)

(f)      Time limit on movers of motions (Standing Order 21.2)

(g)     Additional information on procedural motions to close or adjourn debate (Standing Order 25.1.)

Background

4.       A training session was held on 30 January 2020 with Steve McDowell and Vern Walsh, Meeting Governance Solutions, that went through the changes proposed to the Standing Orders.

5.       Standing Orders contain rules for the conduct of the proceedings of local authorities, committees and subcommittees. Their purpose is to enable local authorities to exercise their decision-making responsibilities in a transparent, inclusive and lawful manner which contributes to greater public confidence in the quality of local governance. Standing Orders are also a means of recording the Council's agreed principles of behaviour within meetings.

6.       The Standing Orders are structured in three parts:

·     Part 1 deals with general matters

·     Part 2 deals with pre-meeting procedures

·     Part 3 deals with meeting procedures

·     Appendices (note the Appendices provide templates and additional guidance; however, these are not part of the Standing orders themselves and can be amended without an agreement of 75% of the members present.)

changes – for information only

7.       The draft Standing Orders in Appendix 1 align with the 2019 edition of the Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) Standing Orders and incorporate all relevant legislative changes made since 2016. These do not require a decision.

8.       These include:

(a)     General - formatting, clarification, readability and grammar updates to the Standing Orders document.

(b)     Definitions – updated definitions from the Local Government Regulatory Matters Act 2019 for working day, internet site and public notice definitions.

(c)     Emergency Meetings - Enacted in 2019, the Local Government Regulatory Matters Act has provided for a new type of meeting referred to as Emergency Meetings.  The difference between extraordinary and emergency meetings is the timeframe involved and the process for calling them. A definition of Emergency meetings has also been added. (SO 8.4-8.7)

(d)     Minutes - Provision has been included to allow for minutes being kept in hard or electronic copy and also confirmed through a manual or electronic signature. (SO 28.1 and 29.2). Archives New Zealand has released guidance on the storage of records by digital means and has given general approval to retain electronic records in digital form. This is issued by the Chief Archivist under section 229(2) of the Contract and Commercial Law Act 2017.

Strategic / Statutory Context

 

9.       All Councils are required by Clause 27, Schedule 7 of the Local Government Act 2002 to adopt a set of Standing Orders that control the way the Council's meetings are conducted.  The Standing Orders must not contravene the Local Government Act 2002, the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (LGOIMA) or any other Act. All members of a local authority must abide by standing orders.

10.     The current Standing Orders were adopted by Council in December 2016.  They remain in place until a new set is adopted. Any change requires agreement of not less than 75% of the members present. 

 

Options Analysis

11.     The Council has discretion over whether to include some standing orders. This is an opportunity to review the practice of the previous Council.   These are summarised below:

(a)     Members’ and public deputations right to attend by audio- or audio-visual link (Standing Orders 13.7 -13.16)

(b)     A casting vote for the Mayor or Chairperson (Standing Order 19.3)

(c)     The choice of a default option for speaking and moving motions (Standing Orders 22.1-22.4)

(i)      Option A – formal

(ii)     Option B – medium

(iii)     Option C – informal

(d)     Delegating powers to the Mayor to grant a leave of absence (Standing Order 13.3)

(e)     Delegating decision making authority to the Chief Executive during the election interregnum period. (Standing Order 6.6)

(f)      Time limit on movers of motions (Standing Order 21.2)

(g)     Additional information on procedural motions to close or adjourn debate (Standing Order 25.1.)

 

Audio and Audio-Visual Link (SO 13.7-13.16)

12.     The Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Act 2014 gave local authorities the option to include in their standing orders a provision to enable members to join meetings by audio or audio-visual means. The right to attend has been updated to include members of the public for the purpose of a deputation approved by the Chairperson (SO 13.7). No other changes are proposed.

13.     The Council has the option to include or not include these audio and audio-visual provisions.

14.     This provision has been in use and Councillors have attended meetings through an electronic link. There can be issues with external wi-fi quality that can impact on the audio-visual link however audio only links have been much more reliable.

15.     It is recommended that these provisions continue in 2019-22 as they provide the ability for the Mayor and Councillors to participate in meetings if they are not physically able to do so.  The updated provisions enable members of the public to address the Council when they cannot physically attend.

 

 

Casting Vote (SO 19.3)

16.     Standing Order 19.3 allows the Mayor or Chairperson to exercise a casting vote where there is an equality of votes. Incorporating a casting vote in a council’s Standing Orders is optional under cl. 24 (2) Schedule 7, LGA 2002.  The casting vote option has been included to enable a meeting to conduct and conclude important business without the risk that a vote might be tied and as a result, a significant statutory timeframe might be exceeded.

17.     The Council needs to review whether the casting vote provision continues, is removed, or is limited.

18.     The limited provision would enable a casting vote to be used only for prescribed types of decisions. This option could specify, for example, that a casting vote can only be used for the adoption of statutory plans, such as the Annual Plan and Long-Term Plan. If a limited casting vote was to be permitted the Council should consider whether there should be any restriction e.g. that the casting vote be limited to statutory decisions that the Council is required to make such as adopting an annual plan.

19.     It is recommended that the Council continue with the casting vote provisions with no limitations.

 

Default option for speaking and moving motions (SOs 22.1-22.4)

20.     The LGNZ standing orders template offers councils a choice of three frameworks, Options A, B or C, for speaking to and moving motions and amendments.  In the 2016-2019 triennium Council adopted Option B as the default for speaking and moving motions.  New Appendices showing diagrams of Options B and C have been added. 

21.     Option A is the most formal of the three. Option A limits the ability of movers and seconders of motions to move amendments.  It also limits the number of times members can speak and move amendments and only members who have not spoken to a motion or substituted motion may move or second an amendment to it. 

22.     Option B is less formal than Option A.  While limiting the ability of movers and seconders of motions to move amendments, it allows more flexibility with moving and seconding amendments if successfully carried. It also provides for members regardless of whether they have spoken to the motion or substituted motion, to move or second an amendment.  This option allows members to speak to any amendment.

23.     Option C provides substantial flexibility by removing the limitations placed on movers and seconders by the other two options and like Option B any member can speak to any amendment. 

24.     The Council or Committee may consider using Option C at the start of a meeting or during the meeting for a particular item to avoid the meeting choosing to suspend standing orders altogether.

25.     It is recommended that Option B be retained as the default for speaking and moving options. 

 

Delegating powers to the Mayor to grant a leave of absence (SO 13.3)

26.     Standing orders provide for a council to delegate the authority to grant a leave of absence to the Mayor.  The previous Standing Orders stated that the Council “may” do this. It is recommended that this be clarified, and the Mayor is explicitly delegated this power to grant a leave of absence in order to protect a members’ privacy.

27.     The Mayor’s application for a leave of absence is approved by the Council.

 

 

 

Delegating decision making authority to the Chief Executive during the election interregnum period (SO 6.6)

28.     It is recommended that a provision be made in Standing Orders to enable the Council to authorise the Chief Executive to make any urgent decisions that cannot wait until the new Council during the election interregnum period (the day following the Electoral Officer’s declaration until the new Council is sworn in).  During this period the incoming Council cannot act until sworn in at the Inaugural Council meeting and the outgoing Council cannot act as they are no longer in office. This delegation requires the Chief Executive to consult with the Mayor elect and report back any decisions to the new Council.

29.     This provision would reduce the need for the Chief Executive to request this authority prior to each triennial election. 

 

Time limits for speakers and General Rules of debate

30.     It is recommended that the time limit on movers of motions when speaking to the motion is reduced from 10 minutes to 5 minutes (Standing Order 21.2). This would speed up the meeting and five minutes is considered to be sufficient time for a mover of a motion to speak to the motion. There is provision for time limits to be extended if a motion to that effect is moved, seconded and supported by a majority of members present.

31.     It is further recommended that a procedural motion to close or adjourn debate can be taken after two speakers have spoken for the motion and two against or, in the chairperson’s opinion, it is reasonable to accept the closure motion (Standing Order 25.1). This ensures that a procedural motion does not close down debate too early while also giving the chairperson the discretion to accept a closure motion at any stage.

 

Financial Considerations

32.     There are no financial impacts from amending standing orders.

Legal Implications / Risks

33.     Changes to standing orders as a result of legislative updates are not able to be amended. Those standing orders which are optional have been highlighted in the report.

34.     The legislation applies even when the standing orders have not been updated. It is best practice to adopt standing orders that are consistent with the legislative changes since the previous version was adopted.

Consultation / Engagement

35.     There is no requirement to consult or engage on changes to standing orders.

Significance

36.     This decision is not considered significant in terms of the Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Click here to view the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy

Next Steps

37.     Standing Orders to be publicly available on the website and electronically provided to the Mayor and Councillors.

Attachments

1.       Standing Orders 2019 Draft TCC with track changes 17 January 2020 - A11177341   


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

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Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

7.5         Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy

File Number:           A10927827

Author:                    Jane Barnett, Policy Analyst

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.    To receive and deliberate on the submissions to the draft Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy.

Recommendations

That the Policy Committee:

(a)     Receives the written submissions to the draft Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy (Attachment One).

(b)     Adopts the Dangerous and Insanitary Building Policy 2020 (Attachment Three) pursuant to section 131 of the Building Act 2004 and for the policy to take effect from 18 February 2020.

(c)     Rescinds the Dangerous, Earthquake-prone and Insanitary Buildings Policy 2011, effective from 18 February 2020.

(d)     Authorises the Chief Executive, or their delegate, to make any typographical changes or to correct minor errors or omissions that may be required before the policy is published.

 

 

Background

2.    Under section 131 of the Building Act 2004 (the Act) Council is required to adopt a policy on dangerous and insanitary buildings within its district, and under s132(4) is required to review the policy within 5 years. Section 132(5) of the Act states that a policy does not cease to have effect because it is due for review or being reviewed.

3.    The policy must state:

(a)     The approach that Council will take in performing its functions under the Building Act 2004

(b)     Its priorities in performing those functions and

(c)     How the policy will apply to heritage buildings

4.    Council’s current Earthquake-prone, Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy was last reviewed in 2011.

5.    All of the provisions relating to earthquake-prone buildings in our current policy are no longer necessary as they are now provided for under new or revised provisions of the Act. The purpose of this legislative change was to provide a nationally consistent approach to managing the risks posed by earthquake-prone buildings, rather than local councils having to develop their own process for identifying and managing these risks.

6.    Section 132A (1) of the Act now requires Council to take into account affected buildings. Affected buildings are buildings that pose a risk to building users and or passers-by because of their proximity to a dangerous building or insanitary building.

7.    In reviewing the current policy, a number of changes were proposed to ensure our policy meets the requirements of the new legislation and provides a clear framework for how Council will identify and manage dangerous, affected and insanitary buildings.

8.    The key changes were:

·        the removal of all policy provisions relating to earthquake prone buildings

·        the inclusion of affected buildings.

·        the additional information on how Council will identify and appropriately deal with dangerous, insanitary and affected buildings to provide greater transparency.

9.    On 30 July 2019, the Policy Committee approved the proposed draft Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy for community consultation.

10.  Consultation on the draft policy opened on 9 September 2019 and closed on 10 October 2019. As required by the Act the special consultative procedure was followed.   Community consultation was undertaken with information available at Council’s Customer Service Centre, the four libraries, on Council’s website and through social media channels.

11.  Three media advisories were issued to help inform the community that the policy was open for consultation. Three posts on social media were made during the consultation period to explain the policy, the proposed changes and to encourage submissions. The consultation was also promoted in two editions of My City News.

12.  Consultation with key stakeholders was undertaken, including the District Health Board, Chamber of Commerce, Heritage New Zealand, mainstreet organisations, Fire and Emergency NZ, Master Builders Association and the Real Estate Association.

Summary of Submissions

13.  Four submissions were received (see Attachment One) and one submitter – Toi Te Ora, initially wished to be heard by the Committee but has since decided not to.

14.  Two of the submissions provided feedback directly on the draft policy. This feedback included:

·        recommending a reactive approach to identifying potentially dangerous and insanitary buildings;

·        identifying where the policy could recognise health in addition to safety;

·        applying a broader definition of heritage buildings;

·        alternative methods to avoid the demolition of heritage buildings; and

·        correct referencing of names in the policy.

15.  The other two submissions focused on issues outside the scope of the policy. One submission expressed concern about Council’s process for earthquake-prone buildings.

16.  The other submission was specifically concerned about a building rented by the submitter. Council staff have responded to the complaint regarding a possible insanitary building and the building was assessed and found not to be insanitary.

17.  Attachment Two identifies the issues raised by submitters and recommends options for responding to them. These recommendations have been incorporated into the recommended policy (Attachment Three). The submitters will be informed of the Council’s decision on the points raised in their submissions and the final adopted policy.

Strategic / Statutory Context

18.  The proposed draft Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy 2020 helps protect the health and safety of our community by reducing the potential risk posed by dangerous, affected or insanitary buildings

Options Analysis

19.  Council is required to have a Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy under section 131 of the Act.

20.  This paper proposes that the Committee approve the recommended changes to the draft policy (as set out in Attachment Two) by adopting the recommended policy (Attachment Three). 

21.  The recommended policy aligns with the new legislative requirements and incorporates feedback from submitters.

Financial Considerations

22.  Revising Council’s Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy does not have budget implications.

Legal Implications / Risks

23.  There are no significant risks associated with the recommendation to adopt the draft Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy.

Consultation / Engagement

24.  The Building Act 2004 requires the policy to be adopted in accordance with the special consultative procedure in section 83 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Significance

25.  The nature and scale of the changes to the policy are of low significance as assessed against Council’s Significant and Engagement Policy. However, as required under the Local Government Act 2002, the Special Consultative Procedure has been followed.

Next Steps

26.  If the Policy Committee decides to adopt the proposed Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy, it will take effect on 18 February 2020. The policy will be made available on Council’s website and all submitters will be notified of the Committee’s decisions. A copy will also be provided to the chief executive of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment in accordance with the Act.

Attachments

1.       Attachment One - Submissions to the draft Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy - A11018516

2.       Attachment Two - Submission Summary and proposed responses - A11127203

3.       Attachment Three - Recommended Dangerous and Insanitary Buildings Policy 2020 - A11127240   


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 


 


 


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Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

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Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

7.6         Hearing of submissions on the draft Coastal Structures Policy

File Number:           A11055081

Author:                    Emma Joyce, Policy Analyst

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       To receive and hear submissions on the draft Coastal Structures Policy

Recommendations

That the Policy Committee:

(a)     Receive the written and verbal submissions on the draft Coastal Structures Policy.

 

Background

2.       The Policy Committee adopted a draft Coastal Structures Policy for consultation in June 2019. Consultation on the draft policy was undertaken in October and November 2019.

3.       This report provides an opportunity for submitters wanting to be heard to present to the Policy Committee.

discussion

4.       The following people requested to be heard on the draft Coastal Structures Policy.

Submitter  number

Name

16

Barry Benton

32

Jan Jameson

37

Ray Lowe

46

Eruera Tuhakaraina

48

Chris Doms

52

John Little

59

Cogito Trust

54

Heritage New Zealand

57

Surfbreak Protection Society

68

Mike Olsen

69

Jennifer Custins

Next Steps

5.       A deliberations report on issues raised through submissions will be presented to the next committee meeting.

Attachments

1.       Copies of submissions from people wanting to be heard - A11083133

2.       All submissions on the draft Coastal Structures Policy - A11055077   


Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

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Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

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Policy Committee Meeting Agenda

11 February 2020

 

8            Discussion of Late Items