AGENDA

 

Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting

Tuesday, 9 June 2020

I hereby give notice that an Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting will be held on:

Date:

Tuesday, 9 June 2020

Time:

12pm

Location:

Tauranga City Council

Council Chambers

91 Willow Street

Tauranga

Please note that this meeting will be livestreamed and the recording will be publicly available on Tauranga City Council's website: www.tauranga.govt.nz.

Marty Grenfell

Chief Executive

 


Terms of reference – Urban Form & Transport Development Committee

 

 

 

Common responsibilities and delegations

The following common responsibilities and delegations apply to all standing committees.

 

Responsibilities of standing committees

·         Establish priorities and guidance on programmes relevant to the Role and Scope of the committee.

·         Provide guidance to staff on the development of investment options to inform the Long Term Plan and Annual Plans.

·         Report to Council on matters of strategic importance.

·         Recommend to Council investment priorities and lead Council considerations of relevant strategic and high significance decisions.

·         Provide guidance to staff on levels of service relevant to the role and scope of the committee. 

·         Establish and participate in relevant task forces and working groups.

·         Engage in dialogue with strategic partners, such as Smart Growth partners, to ensure alignment of objectives and implementation of agreed actions.

 

Delegations to standing committees

·         To make recommendations to Council outside of the delegated responsibility as agreed by Council relevant to the role and scope of the Committee.

·         To make all decisions necessary to fulfil the role and scope of the Committee subject to the delegations/limitations imposed.

·         To develop and consider, receive submissions on and adopt strategies, policies and plans relevant to the role and scope of the committee, except where these may only be legally adopted by Council.

·         To consider, consult on, hear and make determinations on relevant strategies, policies and bylaws (including adoption of drafts), making recommendations to Council on adoption, rescinding and modification, where these must be legally adopted by Council,

·         To approve relevant submissions to central government, its agencies and other bodies beyond any specific delegation to any particular committee.

·         To appoint a non-voting Tangata Whenua representative to the Committee.

·         Engage external parties as required.

 


 

Terms of reference – Urban Form & Transport Development Committee

 

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Cr Larry Baldock

Deputy chairperson

Cr Heidi Hughes

Members

Mayor Tenby Powell

Cr Jako Abrie

Cr Kelvin Clout

Cr Bill Grainger

Cr Andrew Hollis

Cr Dawn Kiddie

Cr Steve Morris

Cr John Robson

Cr Tina Salisbury

Non-voting members

Te Pio Kawe – Tangata Whenua representative

 

Half of the members physically present, where the number of members (including vacancies) is even; and a majority of the members physically present, where the number of members (including vacancies) is odd

Meeting frequency

Six weekly

 

Role

·         To develop a vision and pathway for the future of the City.

·         To ensure that Tauranga’s urban form and transport system enables, supports and shapes sustainable, vibrant and interactive communities.

·         To ensure there is sufficient and appropriate housing supply and choice in existing and new urban areas to meet current and future needs.

·         To ensure there is a clear and agreed approach to achieve measurable improvement in transport outcomes in the medium to long term including transport system safety, predictability of travel times, accessibility, travel choice, mode shift and improved environmental outcomes.

·         To enable Tauranga’s urban centres to thrive and provide a sense of place.

·         To enable the development of a vibrant, safe and successful city centre.

·         To ensure that council and partner investments in Tauranga’s built environment are economically and environmentally resilient.

Scope

·         Development of a multi-modal transport masterplan and associated programmes and network operating plans.

·         Development of the Future Development Strategy, urban settlement pattern and associated monitoring thereof.

·         Development and oversight of urban centres strategies, neighbourhood plans and master-plans.

·         Development and oversight of the Compact City programme in support of higher development densities and the provision of a greater range of housing options.

·         Leadership of plans for the city centre, including the Civic Rebuild programme.

·         Development of City Plan changes and related matters for adoption by Council.

·         Development of strategies, plans and programmes for the medium to long term delivery of social, environmental, economic, cultural and resilience outcomes.

Power to act

·         To make all decisions necessary to fulfil the role and scope of the Committee subject to the limitations imposed.

·         To establish subcommittees, working parties and forums as required.

·         To appoint a non-voting Tangata Whenua representative to the Committee.

Power to recommend

·         To Council and/or any standing committee as it deems appropriate.

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

Order Of Business

1          Apologies. 9

2          Public Forum.. 9

3          Acceptance of Late Items. 9

4          Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open. 9

5          Change to Order of Business. 9

6          Confirmation of Minutes. 10

6.1            Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 17 March 2020. 10

10       Public Excluded Session. 20

7          Declaration of Conflicts of Interest 23

8          Business. 24

8.1            Growth & Land Use Projects Progress Report - June 2020. 24

8.2            Eastern Corridor Wastewater Programme. 38

9          Discussion of Late Items. 47

10       Public Excluded Session. 48

10.1          Public Excluded Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 17 March 2020. 48

10.2          Willow Street Precinct - Historic Issues. 48

 

 


1            Apologies

2            Public Forum 

3            Acceptance of Late Items

4            Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open

5            Change to Order of Business


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

6            Confirmation of Minutes

6.1         Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 17 March 2020

File Number:           A11373353

Author:                    Jenny Teeuwen, Committee Advisor

Authoriser:             Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 17 March 2020 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

Attachments

1.       Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 17 March 2020 

  


UNCONFIRMEDUrban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Minutes

17 March 2020

 

 

MINUTES

Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting

Tuesday, 17 March 2020

 


Order Of Business

1          Apologies. 3

2          Public Forum.. 3

2.1            Margaret Murray-Benge - Transport issues in the lower Tauriko/lower Kaimai area. 3

2.2            Pedestrian Refuges. 4

3          Acceptance of Late Items. 4

4          Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open. 4

5          Change to Order of Business. 4

6          Confirmation of Minutes. 5

6.1            Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 13 February 2020. 5

7          Declaration of Conflicts of Interest 5

8          Business. 5

8.1            Transport & Water Strategy and Planning Projects Progress Report - March 2020. 5

8.2            Natural Hazards & Resilience Planning - Release of Natural Hazards Information, (Open Coast Erosion, Liquefaction & Lateral Spread) 8

8.4            Shared E-scooter Trial 9

10      Public Excluded Session                                                                                                                    

10.1       Item 8.3 - Park and Ride - quick win study - Attachments 1 and 2                                

8.       Business                                                                                                                                      

8.3            Park and Ride - quick win study. 11

9          Discussion of Late Items. 12

 


MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting

HELD AT THE Tauranga City Council, Council Chambers, 91 Willow Street, Tauranga

ON Tuesday, 17 March 2020 AT 9am

 

PRESENT:              Cr Larry Baldock (Chairperson), Cr Heidi Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Mayor Tenby Powell, Cr Jako Abrie, Cr Kelvin Clout, Cr Bill Grainger, Cr Andrew Hollis, Cr Dawn Kiddie, Cr Steve Morris, Cr John Robson, Cr Tina Salisbury and Te Pio Kawe (Tangata Whenua Representative)

IN ATTENDANCE: Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Nic Johansson (General Manager: Infrastructure), Christine Jones (General Manager: Strategy & Growth), Andy Mead (Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning), Claudia Helberg (Team Leader: Waste Strategy and Planning), Campbell Larking (Team Leader: Planning Projects), Steve Raynor (Resilience Specialist: Infrastructure & Urban Form), Peter Siemensma (Senior Transport Planner), Alistair Talbot (Team Leader: Transport Strategy & Planning), Andy Vuong (Programme Manager - Cycle Plan Implementation), Raj Naidu (Committee Advisor), and Jenny Teeuwen (Committee Advisor)

 

1            Apologies

Apology

Committee Resolution  UR2/20/5

Moved:       Cr Tina Salisbury

Seconded:  Cr Dawn Kiddie

That the apology received from Mayor Tenby Powell who was out of the city on council business be accepted.

Carried

 

2            Public Forum

2.1         Margaret Murray-Benge - Transport issues in the lower Tauriko/lower Kaimai area

 

Key points

·                Concerned about the congestion around the SH29 and Cambridge Road intersection.  Believed the installation of temporary lights would help.  Requested that Tauranga City Council (TCC) continue to work with the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) to provide a safe intersection.

·                Concerned about increased traffic on Belk Rd with the new Winstone factory at bottom of the road.

·                Requested that Gargan Rd be opened up to allow access to The Lakes from SH29 to help ease congestion in the short term.

 

Staff response

·                No industrial traffic would be able to access or use Belk Rd under current staging provisions for the Tauriko Business Estate until that road was either upgraded or a replacement road and intersection was built with a connection to SH29.

·                TCC was working with NZTA on the delivery of an early works package which included closing the existing Belk Rd intersection and replacing it with a new roundabout which would connect both into the southern part of Tauriko west and also into the Tauriko business estate and provide access up in to the Belk Rd area.  Current timeframes suggested that it would be possible for that infrastructure to be completed in three to four years.

·                The early works package also included signalisation of the Cambridge Rd/SH29 intersection with roughly the same timeframes as above.

 

In response to questions

·                The closure of Gargan Rd was a requirement of the City Plan because Gargan Rd was unable to safely deal with heavy vehicles.

·                Written documentation providing an explanation of the resource consent and City Plan requirements for the area was requested to be circulated to councillors.

 

Chairperson’s response

The Chairperson thanked Ms Murray-Benge for her presentation.  He also thanked the residents who attended in support of Ms Murray-Benge.  He stated that it was important that TCC and Western Bay of Plenty District Council in conjunction with NZTA continued to work together to find solutions for this area.

Staff Action

Circulate to councillors written documentation providing an explanation of the resource consent and City Plan requirements for the Tauriko/SH 29 area, in particular for Belk Rd and Gargan Rd.

 

 

2.2         Pedestrian Refuges

 

This item was postponed to a future meeting as the speaker was unable to attend.

 

 

3            Acceptance of Late Items

Nil

 

4            Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open

Nil

 

5            Change to Order of Business

Change the Order of Business

Committee Resolution  UR2/20/6

Moved:       Cr Tina Salisbury

Seconded:  Cr Kelvin Clout

That  the order of business be amended so that agenda item 8.3 Park and Ride – a quick study is taken after item 8.4.

Carried

 

6            Confirmation of Minutes

6.1         Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 13 February 2020

Committee Resolution  UR2/20/7

Moved:       Cr Dawn Kiddie

Seconded:  Cr Kelvin Clout

That the minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting held on 13 February 2020 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

7            Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

Nil

 

8            Business

8.1         Transport & Water Strategy and Planning Projects Progress Report - March 2020

Staff                Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

                        Alistair Talbot, Team Leader: Transport Strategy & Planning

                        Claudia Helberg, Team Leader: Waste Strategy and Planning

 

Transport - Key points

 

Transport – Planning Projects

·                The Urban Form and Transport Initiative (UFTI)

-               The interim report was released in December 2019. The final report was due in May 2020.

·                Transport System Plan (TSP)

-               The procurement process to appoint suppliers to support delivery of the TSP was underway.

·                Regional Mode Shift Plan

-               This was a newly added project to the update report.

-               The scope for the development of the modal plan was underway. Delivery timeframe was around mid-year.

·                Infrastructure Development Code (IDC)

-               Responses to stakeholder feedback was being finalised.

·                Parking Strategy

-               Awaited direction from UFTI.

-               Also awaited feedback from the National Policy Statement on Urban Design submissions which included potential direction on parking management.

·                Park and Ride Study

-               Discussed as a separate report on this agenda.

·                Tauranga Transport Model

-               Focus on model build and management activities continued.

·                Eastern Corridor Planning

-               Design work was underway around the Papamoa East Interchange (PEI).  The structure planning for Te Tumu was largely complete.

·                Hairini Causeway/Turret Road

-               Awaited direction from UFTI and the TSP Operating Framework.

 

Transport – State Highway Projects

·                Baylink update

-               NZTA had indicated a decision for the underpass would be available at the end of March.  The decision was key to next steps.

·                State Highway 2 North

-               Work continued with NZTA on timing, implications and costs for the NZ Upgrade Programme announced in January 2020.

·                Western Corridor

-               Work continued with NZTA on the early works package.

·                17th Ave connection to Takitimu Drive

-               The emergency access connection was flagged by NZTA as a possible short term solution dependent on construction of the 15th Ave/Takitimu Drive connection.

·                Hewletts Rd – Short term investigation

-               The NZTA was leading and progressing investigations for short term options for safety improvements.

 

Transport – Multi Modal Projects

·                Arataki Corridor

-               This project was now being reported through the General Manager – Infrastructure report to the Projects, Services and Operations Committee.

·                Bus Facility – Arataki

-               An issues and options paper was due to be presented to Council in April.

·                Bus Facility – City Centre

-               On hold pending direction for the wider City Centre and Civic Administration Building project.

·                Cameron Road Corridor Improvements

-               An update on this project would be provided to Councillors in a separate briefing.

·                Cycle Plan Implementation

-               The route options assessment was underway.

·                Public Transport (PT) Implementation Plan

-               Staff continued to work with partners on the implementation plan.

 

Transport – General Projects

·                Work continued on business cases for NZTA funding.

 

In response to questions

·                Methodology to get to one preferred option proposed in the UFTI Interim Report was being developed.

·                The UFTI final report was due to the Smartgrowth committee in May.  Timing for this was on track.

·                There was no standard template for the Regional Mode Shift Plan.  TCC would be looking at the work already done at Auckland City Council as a guide.  The plan would largely reflect what TCC was already doing.

·                The parking strategy would work in with mode shift and how mode shift was delivered.

·                The most congested area of the PEI network would be in the town centre area, in particular around Te Okuroa Drive and the access to the PEI.  This was being considered in the design work.

·                A three-lane peak period tidal flow for the Hairini Causeway/Turret Rd corridor was one option under consideration as part of the overall project.

·                Development in new areas was guided by a structure plan which included details of the planned cycle networks within that area.

·                The Turret Rd bridge was under TCC, the Maungatapu and the harbour bridges were under NZTA and the Matapihi bridge was owned by KiwiRail.  All were part of the TSP project. TCC, NZTA and KiwiRail were represented on the TSP governance group. Tangata whenua representation on the governance group was being discussed.

·                A decision on the Bayfair underpass was expected at the end of March.

·                The 17th Ave connection to Takitimu Drive would be a short term solution for up to five years.

·                TCC was working on short term safety improvements for cyclists along Totara Street and in particular at the Totara St/Hewletts Rd intersection. TCC was also working with NZTA for more bus/cycle lane safety signage along Hewletts Rd.

·                Part of the Cycle Plan Implementation project included community liaison groups and interactions which would be happening over the next few months.

·                It was requested that the Bay of Plenty Regional Council Public Transport Committee be invited to speak on the PT Blueprint at the next appropriate council committee meeting. 

·                Staff were collating a prioritised list of business cases to be developed for NZTA funding.

 

Waters - Key Points

 

Wastewater Projects

·                A detailed report on both the Eastern and Western corridor wastewater studies would be brought to the next Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting.

·                A spatial planning exercise would be undertaken to identify water, stormwater and wastewater requirements in the Te Papa intensification project.

·                The Te Maunga Ocean Outfall project was still in the options investigation stage.

 

Water Supply Projects

·                The Western Corridor Water Supply Study had just been initiated and was due to be completed in September 2020 in time for Long Term Plan discussions.

·                Eastern Corridor Water Study – The extension of the Waiāri water supply all the way to  Mount Maunganui was critical to take pressure off the Joyce Treatment Plant.

 

Stormwater Projects

·                Tauriko West comprehensive stormwater consent – a comprehensive stormwater discharge consent was being worked on which was intended to be lodged at the same time as the structure plan was being notified.

·                Kaituna Overflow – Planning continued on this large project.

·                Nanako Stormwater Consent – The Kennedy Road embankment would be enhanced to enable the embankment to act as a large dam, with a second dam being constructed downstream.

·                Large Dam Safety Upgrades – around 40 dams in the Tauranga city area had been identified under the new dam safety regulations.  TCC’s database currently identified 3 dams.

 

Three Waters Modelling Projects

·                All the water supply, wastewater and stormwater modelling projects were progressing to plan.

 

In response to questions

·                Water and wastewater strategies had been developed for some time and placed TCC in a good position for delivering water infrastructure for the city over the next 50 years.

·                Information was requested on what programmes or strategies TCC had in place to stop plastics from entering the stormwater system.

·                The upgrade of the pipe under the Te Maunga Outfall project was sitting in year 2028 of the current LTP at $170 million. Options to push this out past 2028 were being considered.

·                Catchment and storing of stormwater on individual properties was possible but did not reduce what was needed to be invested in the network.  Infrastructure was built for peak demand.

·                Information on peak demand for wastewater, commercial vs residential, was requested.

·                Once stormwater ponds and wetlands had been completed following approval of the Nanako stormwater consent, the dam at the top of Kennedy Road would be decommissioned.

·                A briefing on TCC’s legal requirements around large dams was requested.

 

Staff Actions

The following staff actions were recorded for this item:

·                The Bay of Plenty Regional Council Public Transport Committee be invited to speak on the PT Blueprint at the next appropriate council committee meeting.

·                Councillors to receive a briefing on TCC’s legal requirements and accountabilities around large dams.

·                Information on what programmes or strategies TCC had in place to stop plastics from entering the stormwater system be circulated to councillors.

·                The Beca report on feasibility for property on-site catchment and storage of stormwater be circulated to councillors.

·                Information on peak demand for wastewater, commercial vs residential, be circulated to councillors.

 

Committee Resolution  UR2/20/8

Moved:       Cr John Robson

Seconded:  Cr Andrew Hollis

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee receives the Transport & Water Strategy and Planning Progress Report – March 2020.

Carried

 

8.2         Natural Hazards & Resilience Planning - Release of Natural Hazards Information, (Open Coast Erosion, Liquefaction & Lateral Spread)

Staff                Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

Campbell Larking, Team Leader: Planning Projects

Steve Raynor, Resilience Specialist: Infrastructure & Urban Form

 

Key points

·                TCC had undertaken natural hazards assessments and planning for Tauranga city for approximately 20 years.

·                Natural hazards and resilience planning had legislative functions under the Local Government Act 2002, Resource Management Act 1991, Building Act 2004 and the Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2002.

·                TCC’s Resilience Project outcomes were around managing the urban form and the infrastructure associated with that urban form to improve the resilience of the city through slow creep natural hazard events i.e. those events affected by sea level rise (over a 100 year period).

·                Updated harbour inundation information was released last year that took into account three natural hazard inundation events (1 in 50 year, 1 in 100 year, 1 in 500 year).

·                The programme continued this year, focussing on open coast erosion, liquefaction and lateral spread, and slope instability updates.

·                Letters would be going out to community along the open coast with new updated erosion information and included a map of changed information and frequently asked questions (FAQ).  One on one interviews with staff would then be available to those landowners.  Approximately 660 properties were affected, which translated into 542 letters.

·                The Liquefaction project included mapping liquefaction vulnerability within the city (vulnerability meaning not likely or low as opposed to highly likely).  The information gathered would be transferred into land damage scenarios.  The information affected all properties in the city to some degree.  The information would be disseminated via a communications programme.

 

Committee Resolution  UR2/20/9

Moved:       Cr Dawn Kiddie

Seconded:  Cr Tina Salisbury

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee receives the report ‘Natural Hazards and Resilience Planning – Release of Natural Hazards Information, (Open Coast Erosion, Liquefaction and Lateral Spread)’.

Carried

 

8.4         Shared E-scooter Trial

Staff                Andy Vuong, Programme Manager - Cycle Plan Implementation

External         Lauren Mentjox, Public Affairs Manager, Lime

 

Key points

·                Investigations for the E-Scooter trial included experiences and lessons learned from other local authorities such as Auckland Council, Wellington City Council, Christchurch City Council and Queenstown Lakes District Council.

·                All e-scooter usage was regulated by NZTA.

·                E-scooter operators in Tauranga would require a licence to operate which would fall under the Street Use and Public Places 2018 bylaw.

·                Recommended operating conditions focussed on courtesy speed zones, operating hours, restricted zones, parking designated zones, and no end of trip zones.

·                Lime was recommended for the six month trail because of their experience in New Zealand, both good and bad.

 

In response to questions

·                Current NZTA legislation did not allow e-scooters to use cycle lanes.  NZTA were reviewing this as part of the Accessible Streets Consultation Package.

·                It was not likely that the workload costs of setting up the trial, including research investigations and legal opinions, would be recouped by the licence fee during the six month trial term but would if project was ongoing.

·                Per ride fees enabled the operator to fine tune, up and down, how many e-scooters were available at any one time due to demand, rather than have a pre-determined number of scooters in circulation regardless of the levels of usage.

·                It was expected that the trial would employ around 10-20 fulltime staff with up to a possible further 30 casual/part time staff. 

·                The e-scooters would automatically decrease speed when entering limited speed zones.

·                How and where scooters were parked at end of journeys, and traction over slippery paver surfaces and cobblestones in the CBD, would be monitored during the trial.

·                Lime would be the first point of contact for the community with a dedicated customer support phone line, and an email line.  Employees would be locals so they would always be just a phone call away. 

·                The trial would identify whether shared services for e-scooter and e-bikes could work.

 

 

Committee Resolution  UR2/20/10

Moved:       Cr Larry Baldock

Seconded:  Cr Kelvin Clout

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Receives the Report;

(b)     Endorses a shared e-scooter trial with the recommended framework and operating conditions;

(c)     Endorses conducting exclusive negotiations with Lime NZ to be the licensed operator during Phase 1 of the trial.

Carried

 

10          Public Excluded Session  

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

Committee Resolution  UR2/20/11

Moved:       Cr Kelvin Clout

Seconded:  Cr Tina Salisbury

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, with the exception of Mr Craig Richards, Senior Associate – Transport Advisory, Beca, as his specialist knowledge of Attachment 2: Beca report Tauranga Park and Ride “Quick Wins” Options Investigation Study (2020) will assist in the discussion of this item.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

8.3 – Park and Ride – quick win study – Attachments 1 and 2.

s7(2)(i) - the withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

s48(1)(a)(i) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

Carried

 

At 12.10pm, the meeting adjourned for lunch.

 

At 1pm, the meeting resumed in the Public Excluded session.

 

At 1.22pm, the meeting returned to the open part of the meeting to continue the discussion on item 8.3 Park and Ride - quick win study.

 

8.3         Park and Ride - quick win study

Staff           Alistair Talbot, Team Leader: Transport Strategy & Planning

Peter Siemensma, Senior Transport Planner

External     Craig Richards, Senior Associate – Transport Advisory, Beca

 

Key points

·                Key success factors considered for park and ride were:

-               CBD car parking shortage and high parking prices,

-               traffic congestion on routes feeding the CBD,

-               public transport services,

-               population catchments near park and ride sites, and

-               close proximity to main arterial routes.

·                Three locations had been shortlisted – South, Papamoa and Baypark.

·                Regional Council had advised that they could support this initiative for at least the first 12 months through Annual Plan funding.

 

In response to questions

·                The former TEL office site in Tara Rd had been ruled out due to ground issues making it unsuitable for car parking.  Revisiting this site would be considered.

·                Reserves were not considered as this would require the purpose of the reserve to be revoked.

·                A ferry service could be considered in the longer term.

·                Park and ride was only one solution for traffic management.  Alone, it would not solve the traffic issues.

·                There was community engagement as part of the Regional Council’s Public Transport Blueprint document which included park and ride as a short term option.

·                No particular study had been undertaken on informal park and ride locations around the city and the numbers involved.

·                The cost of the trial was not currently available.

 

Committee Resolution  UR2/20/12

Moved:       Cr Larry Baldock

Seconded:  Cr Heidi Hughes

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Approves work to further investigate potential Park and Ride trial facilities at:

i.        Tara Road

ii.       The privately owned site in the south of Tauranga; and/or

iii.      Baypark

(b)     This work to be incorporated into the wider Transport System Plan (TSP) project. 

(c)     Retains Attachments A and B in confidential on the grounds that withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In Favour:       Crs Larry Baldock, Heidi Hughes, Kelvin Clout, Bill Grainger, Dawn Kiddie, Steve Morris and Tina Salisbury

Against:           Crs Jako Abrie, Andrew Hollis and John Robson

carried 7/3

Carried

 

 

Item – 8.4 Shared E-scooter Trial - has been moved to another part of the document.

 

9            Discussion of Late Items

Nil

 

 

Section – 10 Public Excluded Session – has been moved to another part of the document.

 

 

The meeting closed at 2.22pm.

 

The minutes of this meeting to be confirmed at the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting held on 28 April 2020.

 

...................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

7            Declaration of Conflicts of Interest


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

8            Business

8.1         Growth & Land Use Projects Progress Report - June 2020

File Number:           A11110584

Author:                    Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       Tauranga City is continuing to experience rapid growth.  Managing this growth is a significant issue for Council.  The report enables Elected Members to monitor progress on key projects related to facilitating growth.

Recommendations

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee receives the Growth & Land Use Projects Progress Report – June 2020.

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       Tauranga City is continuing to experience rapid growth. Managing this growth is a significant issue for Council.

3.       The attached report outlines the progress being made in relation to a number of projects necessary to facilitate this continued growth.  This information is also regularly reported to the SmartGrowth partners & the SmartGrowth forums.

4.       Key points to note in this update include:

(a)     Preparation of applications to use the Streamline Planning Process for the Housing Choice and Flooding from Intense Rainfall Events plan changes in accordance with resolutions passed in August 2019.

(b)     Need to remove significant residential areas from the Housing Choice Plan Change to assist in meeting the natural hazards provisions of the Regional Policy Statement.

(c)     The Maori Appellate Court decision in relation to Te Tumu and further appeal by Te Tumu Kaituna 14 to the Court of Appeal.

(d)     Revision of the proposed 2021 to 2031 LTP population and dwelling growth projections in response to COVID-19.

Strategic / Statutory Context

5.       While growth is a significant issue for Tauranga City, this report does not require any decisions and it is not significant in itself.

Options Analysis

6.       There are no options; this report is for information only.

Significance

7.       While growth is a significant issue for Tauranga City, this report does not require any decisions and is not significant in itself.

Next Steps

8.       Council will continue to progress the projects and works as identified in the report attachment.

Attachments

1.       Quarterly Update - Growth and Land Use - A11551820

2.       Update for the UTFD Committee on the Shape your City engagement (April & May 2020) - A11500977   


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 


 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

Summary of ‘Shape your City’ engagement – April and May 2020

Purpose: For the UFTD June 2020 report, in support of the Quarterly Project Updates for Te Papa Spatial Plan and Plan Change 26

 

The focus of this stage of engagement was to involve the community in both the Te Papa Plan and the Housing Choice Plan Change and to ensure knowledge about both interlinked projects was as widely spread as possible. The engagement sought to provide people across Tauranga with an opportunity to give us their views on ideas for supporting growth in Te Papa, and on proposed changes to the City Plan to enable more housing choice. Note this was not a formal consultation process under the RMA.

 

Unfortunately, in COVID-19 Alert Level 4 and 3 we were not able to meet the community face-to-face to talk about how we can shape the future of our city, neighbourhoods and homes together. Therefore, between 7 April and 19 May 2020 we provided a wide range of other ways people could give us their feedback and to get in touch or learn more about the projects. To ensure the project reaches all audiences, online engagement was supported by elements that target older audiences and audiences that are not online savvy, such as radio advertising, free community paper and newspaper advertising, as well as phone-in opportunities to speak to a member of the team, etc., to supplement the lack of face-to-face engagement.

 

Who we engaged with

How we engaged

Wider community/ grassroots communities/ interested residents

·      Extensive online information provided about the background to the projects, technical information, previous engagement, how to provide feedback and where to go for more information – www.tauranga.govt.nz/shapeyourcity and across project pages www.tauranga.govt.nz/housing-choice and www.tauranga.govt.nz/tepapa.

·      Webpages (including have your say and all project pages) were viewed 25,783 times.

·      Feature item on TCC homepage for the entire period of engagement.

·      An online survey - Incentives were offered for survey respondents to win. A hard copy of the survey was available – either online or people could call Council to request a copy with a freepost envelope to return to Council.

·      1:1 chats with experts – people could book a one-on-one chat with one of our project team members between 4 and 18 May 2020 to talk about the topics of interest to them, share their views and find out more. Through these discussions we encouraged feedback via the survey and the Te Papa or City Plan email address.

·      Ask a question – online chance to submit questions and an expert emailed a response within two working days. The dedicated emails (tepapa.project@tauranga.govt.nz and cityplan@tauranga.govt.nz) provided a feedback channel with a personal response to every email.

·      Videos of community members sharing their views on how living in a future city and Te Papa could look like: (Living in a more compact city: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hX4F1FSjfHw&t=1s, Connected: https://youtu.be/55vHrT6Tvk4, Unique: https://youtu.be/G-o5Yh980R0, Healthy: https://youtu.be/wEniOD-_f5I).

·      Worked with external organisations to share information through their communication channels such as Facebook, websites and newsletters

·      3 Te Papa e-news issued to 1800 subscribers with an average 41% open rate – these provided information about the projects and promoted the engagement opportunities, including the 1:1 chats and the online survey.

·      3 City news e-news issued to 1500 subscribers with an average 48% open rate – these featured information about the projects and promoted ways to share feedback.

·      Promoted on the Council’s main phone queue and in any email responses from contact centre staff for the last 2 weeks of the engagement period.

·      Issued two media releases to local media and responded to two media enquiries.

·      10 articles published in print and online outlets (Sunlive, Bay of Plenty Times) reaching 32,000 readers.

·      Two half page features in the Weekend Sun reaching 70,000 readers (per issue) and one half page and four quarter pages in Bay of Plenty Times reaching 29,000 readers (per issue) and a quarter page in Bay of Plenty Business News.

·      1 story in Our Place Magazine online issue and newsletter reaching 15,000 subscribers.

·      Overall digital advertising to create awareness generated 2.5 million impressions (the number of times an ad or piece of content was displayed on screen), 6400 link clicks to the have your say and project webpages (0.25% click through rate compared to 0.06% industry average).

·      108 posts across council’s social media channels (Facebook, Neighbourly, LinkedIn, Youtube, Twitter and Instagram) reached 213,000 people, displayed posts 625,000 times on screen (impressions), resulting in 71,600 post engagements (total number of actions people take such as likes, comments, shares and clicks) and 6650 unique link clicks to our webpages.

·      15 insertions in the Sunlive daily news bulletin over four weeks reaching 5,200 subscribers weekly.

·      Four different 30-second and 60-second radio ads played 840 times across eight radio stations: The Edge, Mai FM, More FM, The Breeze, ZM, Hauraki, The Hits, Newstalk ZB.

TCC Councillors

Regular updates were provided to Councillors throughout this stage of engagement to assist in ensuring they were fully briefed of the purpose and plans for engagement and had the opportunity to input on behalf of their constituents. This included:

·      Regular updates provided in weekly Council Catch-ups.

·      All Councillors received the e-newsletter updates.

Mana whenua

·      The Housing Choice plan change have held a number of hui with iwi and hapu representatives since April 2019 and monthly attendance at the Te Rangapu Mana Whenua o Tauranga Moana hui since October 2019.

·      Over the pre-consultation period, the Plan Change had hui x 2 with Te Rangapū to share information, provide an overview, invite questions, comments and clarification, confirm key issues and have further discussion.

·      Project email sent to Te Rangapū Partnership.

·      Project email sent to Tauranga Māori Business Association.

·      Tangata whenua groups received the regular e-newsletter.

·      For Te Papa, a specific Mana whenua representative group has been set up with engagement occurring since October 2019 and planned through to Sept 2020, including regular hui and other project wananga (workshops).

Programme partners / stakeholders

Organisations, project relationship partners and key stakeholders were contacted during this stage of engagement, including UFTI, BOPRC, WBOPDC, SmartGrowth, NZTA, MHUD and Accessible Properties. The purpose of this was to continue the dialogue about the project and also to raise awareness to the opportunities for engaging with the community. This included:

·      Face-to-face workshops with WBOPDC, BOPRC and MHUD were held prior to the lock down.

·      Skype workshop with Kāinga Ora was held prior to the lock down.

·      Detailed presentations with video and technical documents were sent to programme partners and opportunities for conversations/ feedback to project teams provided.

·      Feedback from programme partner colleagues within their organisation was welcomed.

·      All programme partners received the regular e-newsletter.

·      Virtual meetings have been set up as requested in response to feedback.

Community stakeholders

Both projects’ stakeholder lists were combined to reach out to all key and community stakeholders during this stage of engagement. Stakeholder relay and use of stakeholders’ own channels was an important part of sharing information. During the planning stages for Stage 2 engagement a Top 30 stakeholder list was prepared. Each of these stakeholders were contacted directly during the 6-week engagement period. The purpose of this was to continue the conversation about growth in Tauranga, talk about how stakeholders can contribute, and to raise awareness of the opportunities for engaging with the wider community. This included:

·      Prior to the 6-week engagement period we met with a number of groups in March 2020 (prior to COVID-19 Lockdown).

·      Targeted emails for each stakeholder – including communications collateral to share through their own channels and links to the webpage/survey.

·      For technical key stakeholders this included detailed presentations with videos, Te Papa discussion document, PC26 overview and draft detailed provisions for PC26.

·      Worked with internal Council teams to distribute messaging through their existing networks (e.g. Community Development Team and Project Tauranga). Follow up emails to offer the opportunity for one-to-one chats with the project team.

·      All key and community stakeholders received the regular e-newsletter.

·      Virtual meetings have been set up as requested in response to feedback.

Internal TCC staff

Internal council teams were updated regularly in the month prior to, and during, this stage of engagement to ensure they were fully briefed of the purpose and plans for engagement and had the opportunity to input on behalf of their teams. This included:

·      The Project Team contacted directly a number of internal teams to offer focused chats.

·      Face-to-face workshops were held with internal staff to discuss PC26 and PC27 prior to the lockdown and follow up workshops to discuss feedback will occur in the next 2 weeks.

·      Managers email sent (to relevant Managers) with information to share with teams and an invitation to contact Project Leads for more information.

·      Regular updates on Insider.

·      Regular updates on Marty’s Message.

 

Summary of feedback to date

Feedback to the Te Papa plan and Plan Change 26 - Housing Choice has been received by way of an online survey, responses and queries from individuals using the email link contained within the website, feedback from stakeholders, and direct engagement on a one-to-one basis. The engagement period closed on Tuesday, 19 May 2020 at midnight. We are still processing, evaluating and analysing all of the feedback received. Further analysis will come over the next few weeks.

 

The following provides an initial summary of the Shape your city online survey feedback, including some of the key messages and priorities that are coming through from the community[1]. Please note this does not include any other forms of feedback received.

 

Te Papa plan

·    Ideas for healthy and liveable neighbourhoods in Te Papa – 293 responses, top 2 priorities are ‘Improve our environment’ and ‘Walking and cycling network’.

·    Ideas for connected neighbourhoods in Te Papa – 274 responses, top 2 priorities are ‘Public transport’ and ‘Cycleway improvements’.

·    Ideas for the Greerton neighbourhood – 119 responses, top 2 priorities are ‘Green corridors’ and ‘Pedestrian improvements’.

·    Ideas for Gate Pa-Pukehinahina neighbourhood – 81 responses, top 2 priorities are ‘Extended hospital campus’ and ‘Meet community needs’.

·    Ideas for Merivale neighbourhood – 70 responses, top 2 priorities are ‘Meet community needs’ and ‘Accessible walking and cycling’.

·    Ideas for Tauranga’s city centre – 191 responses, top 2 priorities are ‘City centre vision’ and ‘Improved public spaces’.

In relation to the priorities, there is an overarching them related to the way people move around, which accords well with the direction taken within the Te Papa approach to date, and will assist to further shape the next steps as the team moves forward.

 

Housing Choice

·    Duplexes in the suburban residential zone – Total of 743 responses on 15 topics - the top 3 questions on proposed rules answered in this framework were: Car parking (58 responses), Dwelling size (58 responses) and Cycle parking (54 responses).

·    Rows of townhouses in the suburban residential zone – Total of 310 responses on 13 topics - the top 3 questions on proposed rules answered in this framework were: Cycle parking (30 responses, Density (29 responses) and Private outdoor (28 responses).

·    Residential developments in Te Papa (townhouses and apartments) – Total of 482 responses on 15 topics - the top 3 questions on proposed rules answered in this framework were: Heights (51 responses), Cycle parking (42 responses) and Dwelling size (37 responses).

·    Residential activities in the commercial zone – Total of 144 responses on 3 questions: Proposing to make residential activities in commercial areas a ‘restricted discretionary activity’ (58 responses), Proposing to require responses wanting to develop a residential activity on the ground floor in the commercial zone to go through a more complex resource consenting process (53 responses) and Other smaller changes to the city plan rules (33 responses).

·    Urban design assessment criteria – 45 responses were provided, plus 18 additional comments.

In general, the responses provided are indicating support in principle for the plan change but are seeking amendments to some of the provisions.

 

 

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

8.2         Eastern Corridor Wastewater Programme

File Number:           A11534819

Author:                    Claudia Hellberg, Team Leader: Waters Strategy & Planning

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       To summarise the work to date on eastern corridor wastewater planning.

2.       To present the outcomes of the eastern corridor wastewater strategy and seek in principal approval to proceed with its implementation.

Recommendations

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Endorses the outcomes of the Eastern Corridor Wastewater Programme.

(b)     Agrees to proceed with the implementation of the Opal Drive Rising Main and Opal Drive Pump Station as a priority to service existing zoned land subject to budget being available through the 2020/21 Annual Plan and 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

(c)     Agrees in principle to the delivery of the Eastern Corridor Wastewater Programme subject to budget being available through the 2021-31 Long Term Plan.

 

 

Executive Summary

3.       Trunk wastewater infrastructure projects to service the eastern corridor have been planned for over two decades as part of long-term planning for the growth of the coastal strip. After a comprehensive assessment of options was carried out, a staged programme of upsizing existing infrastructure was included in the Ten-Year Plan 2009/2019. Implementation of the programme was deferred as a result of the delays in growth and revenue resulting from the global financial crisis.

4.       Design work on individual projects was recommenced 2016/2017 in response to uptake of development in Wairakei Urban Growth Area, planning for commencement of the Te Tumu Urban Growth Area, and the prolonged operational issues and risks of the current network.

5.       Commencement of detailed design work following an extended break raised questions about design requirements and whether the projects still in fact aligned with TCC strategic objectives. Recommendation was made that delivery be halted in favour of preparing a corridor wide strategy.

6.       The Eastern Corridor Wastewater Strategy was prepared 2018/19 involving a working group from across TCC and input from tangata whenua and developers. The study investigated numerous options and identified a preferred option based on the previous strategy but with amendments to accommodate greater focus on disaster and operational resilience as well as provision to accommodate growth. Delivery of the options was also reviewed to inform updated budgets, programmes and risk schedules, which have since been reflected in TCC finance and capital project management systems.  

7.       Previous deferral of new infrastructure has increased the criticality of existing assets and exacerbated operational issues and risks. The strategy has confirmed that planned projects are required to provide for the present population and the completion of the existing growth areas of Papamoa and Wairakei. In implementing these works, consideration should also be given to planned future growth at Te Tumu.

8.       Budget exists in 2019/20 and 2020/21 for professional services fees and internal costs for projects within the programme. Priority projects include progression of design for upgrades to the Opal Drive rising main system and construction of a replacement pump station at Opal Drive, which have been planned for over two decades. The system does not have capacity to manage peak flows from the current population and there are operational issues and risks associated with the ongoing use of the Opal Drive pump station which was intended only as an interim solution in the 1990s.  

Background

9.       Papamoa’s trunk wastewater network was developed from the late 1980s to service areas of growth. The incremental, ribbon nature of development along the coastal strip has led to a network with numerous pump stations often linked with common rising mains, making the network reliant on critical assets with limited redundancy.

10.     Much of the trunk infrastructure is centred around the Wairakei Stream Corridor which has environmental, cultural and recreational value. Unlike when Papamoa was initially developed, this corridor is now bordered with houses and includes expanded waterways and planting. The stream makes this corridor vulnerable to lateral spread from liquefaction in an earthquake. 

11.     The eastern corridor is predicted to grow from a 2018 population of approximately 28,000 to approximately 35,000 by 2063 within existing zoned land in Papamoa and Wairakei. This increases to nearly 50,000 people when including the future growth area of Te Tumu and potentially 60,000 people if higher densities are achieved in Te Tumu than currently anticipated.

12.     Current Network constraints include:

(a)     Opal Drive Pump Station

The Opal Drive Pump Station is a key pump station and pumps all flows from the eastern and central Papamoa area and Wairakei Urban Growth Area through to the Te Maunga wastewater treatment plant – a population of over 16,000 people (as at 2018). This is the largest and most significant pump station for the Eastern section of Tauranga City. The asset is a former package treatment plant which serviced Papamoa prior to local government amalgamation. In 1991 the plant was decommissioned and converted to a pump station as a temporary measure. The conversion of a treatment plant to a pump station was never intended as a long-term solution and it is now extremely overloaded and experiencing failure during peak flows. The converted treatment tank is too shallow to provide storage, too small for larger pumps and has temporary timber seals. This pump station is susceptible to operational and odour issues and is the weakest link in the Papamoa network, and the risk of wastewater overflows, which would flow onto private properties is continuously increasing. 

(b)     Opal Drive Rising Main

The initial section of the existing rising main was subsequently found to be too small to cater for growth in Papamoa, and the remainder of the pipeline was installed as a larger internal diameter. The early rising main section presents a capacity constraint in the current network, as well as a condition constraint due to the material. The increased risks of failure can lead to public health and environmental consequences.

Even with the removal of the above capacity constraint, the rising main from Opal Drive is of insufficient capacity to reliably manage peak flows from the existing population, and it is recognised that a second rising main is required to cater for growth in the corridor.

(c)     Golden Sands Pump Station

The existing pump station in Golden Sands is a small local pump station that has been upgraded with large pumps installed to increase its capacity and defer construction of the new major pump station for the growth area. However, this has resulted in a compromised operation of the pump station. The pump station does not have sufficient capacity to cater for the full build out of Wairakei Urban Growth Area, nor does it have the ability to be further upgraded.

(d)     Golden Sands Rising Main

The rising main between the Golden Sands Pump Station and Opal Drive Pump Station includes capacity constraints and is at the end of its useable life due to condition concerns exacerbated by the installation of large pumps at Golden Sands pump station.

13.     Tauranga City Council undertook the Papamoa Pipeline Project from 2007 to progress the delivery of wastewater infrastructure to address the above issues and provide for growth. This included a review of options for wastewater servicing of Wairakei as well as consideration of the potential for future development of the Te Tumu Urban Growth Area identified in the SmartGrowth settlement pattern.

14.     Although good progress was made in the design of the solution and securing of designations and authorities, progress on project delivery was halted in the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis.

15.     Work on wastewater infrastructure projects restarted in 2016/17 with the aim of progressing the preliminary design work to construction to cater for the renewed uptake in growth.

16.     Commencement of detailed design work following an extended break raised questions about design requirements and whether the projects still in fact aligned with TCC strategic objectives. Recommendation was made that delivery be halted in favour of preparing a corridor wide strategy.

Strategic / Statutory Context

17.     It is Council’s responsibility to provide adequate wastewater servicing and minimise potential for wastewater overflows into the environment. New growth can only occur in areas, where appropriate wastewater services are available before titles for individual lots are issued. 

Options Analysis

18.     The Eastern Corridor Wastewater Strategy was prepared 2018-2019 with consultants WSP and a core project team spanning the Infrastructure Planning, Project Management Office, City Waters and Planning Projects teams. Engagement and consultation were also undertaken with tangata whenua, major developers and landowners, New Zealand Transport Agency, and TCC teams including Spaces and Places, Transportation, Strategic Finance, Strategic Property and Development Contributions.

19.     The project established performance criteria for the infrastructure and growth allowances to meet TCC obligations around urban development capacity, natural hazards resilience, environmental performance, and asset and operational long-term planning. The existing trunk network was assessed to understand the current issues as well as any opportunities to maximise existing infrastructure capacity. 

20.     Areas for consideration and avoidance, as well as input into objectives and opportunities, were provided by tangata whenua, New Zealand Transport Agency, developers and major landowners and TCC teams responsible for transport corridors and public reserves. Desktop constraints analysis was also undertaken.

21.     A comprehensive Multi Criteria Analysis (MCA) process was undertaken by the project team to consider the design and construction stage as well as operation and impacts over the asset life. The preferred option was chosen as the highest scoring option after sensitivity testing of criteria weightings and project phases.

22.     The preferred option (Attachment A) echoed the previous planning, however altered some route locations and asset design requirements to reflect resilience, environmental and operational considerations, as well as reflect that much of the corridor is now a developed brownfield environment. The projects that form this strategy are:

(a)     Upgrade of the existing Opal Drive rising main to remedy the capacity constraint.

(b)     Replacement of Opal Drive pump station with a new asset on the current designated site. Includes improvements to increase resilience, operational flexibility, and ability to provide for growth.

(c)     New rising main from Opal Drive to Te Maunga. Preferred alignment based around Papamoa Beach Road. Includes improvements for resilience, constructability, effects management, and opportunities for future asset management and coordination with other potential improvements along the corridor.

(d)     New pump station at the currently designated Wairakei site. Includes improvements to increase resilience, operational flexibility, and ability to provide for growth.

(e)     New rising main from Wairakei pump station to Opal Drive pump station. Includes improvements for resilience, constructability, effects management, and opportunities for future asset management and coordination with other improvements along the corridor.

(f)      New rising main from Te Tumu to Wairakei pump station following development road corridors. Includes allowance for dual pipes to manage operational and growth issues as the growth area develops.

(g)     Upgrades to the existing rising main servicing Papamoa West to reduce operational issues and provide for continued development.

23.     An additional investigation was commissioned to investigate the impact of changes in assumptions for Te Tumu on options and costs. The high-level testing of lower assumed flows (based on different wastewater technologies, not lower population growth projections) found that projects established in the strategy is still required to be constructed, with the majority of costs still incurred, to provide infrastructure for the coastal strip. 

24.     Investigations have also been undertaken to ensure there are wastewater solutions if there are higher flows from Te Tumu as a result of higher density development than anticipated.  There are options to achieve this that can be implemented within Wairakei such as the delivery of alternative wastewater technologies (eg low pressure systems) or building storage in the network.

25.     The Te Tumu Growth Area alone creates the need for the new rising main from Te Tumu to the Wairakei pump station. All other network elements would still be required to service the already zoned land, only at a slightly smaller size.

26.     A review of the programme delivery as outlined in Attachment B is underway by Alta Consulting to provide advice as the programme progresses. This work is being undertaken to provide specialist industry advice on construction planning, reasonable programme allowances, risks and procurement approaches to help inform the next project stages and delivery of this significant programme by the market.

Proposed eastern corridor wastewater capital programme

27.     The upgrade to Opal Drive rising main is an urgent renewal to resolve an existing capacity issue. Work is underway with the PMO to progress this project (subject to procurement approval). Construction is expected to commence from 2021/2022. The estimated budget for this project is $8.3 million.

28.     Opal Drive and Wairakei pump stations are also required to address capacity constraints for existing zoned areas as well as ongoing operational issues at Opal Drive and Golden Sands pump stations. Design, engagement and consenting is recommended to occur immediately to progress these projects.  The estimated cost for both pump stations together is $40 million.

29.     The new rising mains from Opal and Wairakei pump stations need to be considered as part of the overall system and planning should be progressed to maintain momentum and ready these projects for construction. It is recommended that the preliminary investigations and design are progressed to allow continued preparation for construction. The estimated cost for these rising mains is $96 million.

Financial Considerations

30.     All projects in the corridor were included in the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan and associated Infrastructure Strategy. The budgets for all projects have been updated to reflect the outcome of recent work. The total corridor cost estimate is approximately $160 million. This increased from $47 million in the 2018 LTP budget.  This budget increase was discussed and adopted during deliberations on the draft fees for the Development Contribution Policy 2020/21 at the Policy Committee meeting in February 2020.

31.     Budgets have escalated due to factors including:

(a)     Inclusion of additional costs for TCC internal time, iwi monitoring, legal and other cost categories, based on analysis of typical percentages for previous projects.

(b)     Budgeting of 95th percentile cost estimates on advice from the finance team.

(c)     Revised cost estimates to reflect current market costs as well as expected costs and productivity impacts of working in areas which are now brownfield. 

(d)     Inclusion of additional items such as groundworks at pump stations to align with current TCC resilience strategy and Regional Policy Statement requirements.

32.     The significant increase in the cost of these projects combined with the fact that 95% of Wairakei Development Contributions are locked in (locked in at Resource consent stage) means that there will be a shortfall in the vicinity of $15 million to $20 million.  There is no shortfall in relation to any other growth area.

33.     It is worth noting that the projects and alignments as included in the 2018-2028 LTP were also re-costed for a comparative baseline and were similarly estimated to be higher than previously budgeted.

34.     The draft Annual Plan 2020/21 which was considered and approved by Council in March includes project budgets for professional services.

35.     Funding is largely Development Contributions based with portions of renewal funding for assets such as Opal Drive pump station and rising main which are upgrades to existing infrastructure. Costs are included in the Development Contributions Policy for Wairakei and the estimates and financial viability modelling for Te Tumu.

36.     Revision of cost estimates, budgets and forecasting is required as the projects progress. It is noted that timing may also be affected by Council decisions around the wider capital programme.

37.     Funding for the programme will be consider through development of the next LTP.

Legal Implications / Risks

38.     Key risks include:

(a)     Risks associated with deferring implementation of the programme. This exacerbates existing operation issues, risks environmental and community consequences associated with further wastewater overflows, risks pipe failure and constrains current and future growth and future land supply.

(b)     Risks associated with construction. The programme is largely in an established area and will cause some disruption during construction. There is possibility of accidental discovery during the works. Further work is required around communication and engagement, as well as further exploring opportunities for multiple benefits (such as works in Papamoa Beach Road).

(c)     Financial risks. The costs for this programme are significant. Recent work has attempted to provide considered cost estimates with funding risk included, which mitigates (but does not eliminate) the risks of significant budget overruns at later stages of the project. Options for staging and spreading costs are continuing to be explored, although these are limited by the above risks associated with further deferrals.

Consultation / Engagement

39.     Consultation and engagement occurred during earlier project delivery, including engagement with iwi/hapu and significant stakeholders.

40.     Further communication and engagement is required given the time delay between initial planning and engagement and the implementation of the programme. A preliminary engagement plan has been prepared as part of the strategy for ongoing development and roll out throughout the programme lifecycle.

41.     Staff are in communication with Kāinga Ora and the Tauranga Community Housing Trust (who have a sub-lease to manage the complex on 45 Opal Drive). It is planned to continue communication to allow early preparation for the eventual removal of the 9 Site B houses, as well as investigate any opportunities to mitigate the impact of the loss of these sites (Attachment C). 

42.     Development of the corridor strategy involved consultation with iwi and hapu from Te Tumu to Te Maunga, New Zealand Transport Agency, developers and major landowners in Wairakei and Te Tumu, and various teams across TCC. Ongoing communication with these groups is required. Communication is required with landowners, residents and business in the area as plans for delivery of the physical works are developed.

Significance

43.     The community has been engaged on the Eastern Growth Corridor through various processes including the development of the proposed Future Development Strategy and through the Wairakei and Te Tumu structure planning process. The wastewater servicing strategy provides for important and significant wastewater infrastructure upgrades required to be implemented to enable this growth. 

Next Steps

44.     Finalising of programme planning based on feedback received by Alta Consulting, which is providing specialist industry advice on construction planning, reasonable programme allowances, risks and procurement approaches to help inform the next project stages and delivery of this significant programme by the market.

45.     Council to consider funding for the programme through development of the next LTP.

46.     Council staff to consider appropriate procurement and project management / delivery arrangement.

Attachments

1.       Concept layout for Eastern Corridor Wastewater Programme - A11535441

2.       Eastern Corridor Wastewater - implementation programme summary - A11544734

3.       Attachment C Eastern Corrdior Wastewater UFTD report - 45 Opal Drive - A11535905   


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 



Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

Attachment C – Eastern Corridor Wastewater UFTD report

45 Opal Drive

Purpose

1.   To provide a summary of the lease arrangements at 45 Opal Drive.

Background

2.    TCC owns the Land at 45 Opal Drive, Papamoa. This land is designated for wastewater purposes and held by the wastewater activity.

3.    The current pump station structure is the former package treatment plant which was converted to a temporary pump station following local government amalgamation. The balance of the land is the location of the former drainage field associated with the package treatment plant.

4.    It has long been planned to construct a purpose-built pump station at 45 Opal Drive.

5.    In 2017 Council entered into an agreement with Housing New Zealand to lease HNZC the balance of the site for a transitional housing project. This recognised the fact that a new pump station was required to be built on the site, but that the physical works were not in a position to commence at that time.

6.    TCC agreed to lease the land subject to terms and conditions providing for the future wastewater construction on the area known as ‘Site B’. Site B was determined based on conceptual pump station plans. The space requirement reflects that Opal Drive is the largest and the most critical major pump station in the eastern area of Tauranga.

7.    In total, there are 19 2-3 bedroom transportable houses on the site. Of these, 9 houses are on site B. Key lease periods are:

Start Date: 20 July 2017

Site A: 15-year lease (to July 2032), 10-year renewal period. 

Site B: 5-year lease (to July 2022), 3-year renewal period.

8.    Although the transitional housing on Site B was planned to be temporary, it is recognised that the eventual construction of the pump station will impact upon the tenants and transitional housing availability, particularly given the ongoing demand for these services.

9.    Staff are in communication with Kāinga Ora and the Tauranga Community Housing Trust (who have a sub-lease to manage the complex). It is planned to continue communication to allow early preparation for the eventual removal of the 9 Site B houses, as well as investigate any opportunities to mitigate the impact of the loss of these sites.  

   


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

9            Discussion of Late Items


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

9 June 2020

 

10          Public Excluded Session  

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

Recommendations

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

10.1 - Public Excluded Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 17 March 2020

s7(2)(i) - the withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

10.2 - Willow Street Precinct - Historic Issues

s7(2)(i) - the withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

 

 

 



[1] For more details on the definitions of the Ideas and Framework rules please refer to the project webpages – https://www.tauranga.govt.nz/our-future/projects/te-papa-peninsula and https://www.tauranga.govt.nz/our-future/enabling-growth/plan-change-26-housing-choice