AGENDA

 

Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting

Tuesday, 13 October 2020

I hereby give notice that an Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting will be held on:

Date:

Tuesday, 13 October 2020

Time:

9.30am

Location:

Tauranga City Council

Council Chambers

91 Willow Street

Tauranga

Please note that this meeting will be livestreamed and the recording will be publicly available on Tauranga City Council's website: www.tauranga.govt.nz.

Marty Grenfell

Chief Executive

 


Terms of reference – Urban Form & Transport Development Committee

 

 

 

Common responsibilities and delegations

The following common responsibilities and delegations apply to all standing committees.

 

Responsibilities of standing committees

·        Establish priorities and guidance on programmes relevant to the Role and Scope of the committee.

·        Provide guidance to staff on the development of investment options to inform the Long Term Plan and Annual Plans.

·        Report to Council on matters of strategic importance.

·        Recommend to Council investment priorities and lead Council considerations of relevant strategic and high significance decisions.

·        Provide guidance to staff on levels of service relevant to the role and scope of the committee. 

·        Establish and participate in relevant task forces and working groups.

·        Engage in dialogue with strategic partners, such as Smart Growth partners, to ensure alignment of objectives and implementation of agreed actions.

·        Confirmation of committee minutes.

 

Delegations to standing committees

·        To make recommendations to Council outside of the delegated responsibility as agreed by Council relevant to the role and scope of the Committee.

·        To make all decisions necessary to fulfil the role and scope of the Committee subject to the delegations/limitations imposed.

·        To develop and consider, receive submissions on and adopt strategies, policies and plans relevant to the role and scope of the committee, except where these may only be legally adopted by Council.

·        To consider, consult on, hear and make determinations on relevant strategies, policies and bylaws (including adoption of drafts), making recommendations to Council on adoption, rescinding and modification, where these must be legally adopted by Council,

·        To approve relevant submissions to central government, its agencies and other bodies beyond any specific delegation to any particular committee.

·        To appoint a non-voting Tangata Whenua representative to the Committee.

·        Engage external parties as required.

 


 

Terms of reference – Urban Form & Transport Development Committee

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Cr Larry Baldock

Deputy chairperson

Cr Heidi Hughes

Members

Mayor Tenby Powell

Cr Jako Abrie

Cr Kelvin Clout

Cr Bill Grainger

Cr Andrew Hollis

Cr Dawn Kiddie

Cr Steve Morris

Cr John Robson

Cr Tina Salisbury

 

Te Pio Kawe – Tangata Whenua representative

 

Half of the members physically present, where the number of members (including vacancies) is even; and a majority of the members physically present, where the number of members (including vacancies) is odd

Meeting frequency

Six weekly

 

Role

·        To develop a vision and pathway for the future of the City.

·        To ensure that Tauranga’s urban form and transport system enables, supports and shapes sustainable, vibrant and interactive communities.

·        To ensure there is sufficient and appropriate housing supply and choice in existing and new urban areas to meet current and future needs.

·        To ensure there is a clear and agreed approach to achieve measurable improvement in transport outcomes in the medium to long term including transport system safety, predictability of travel times, accessibility, travel choice, mode shift and improved environmental outcomes.

·        To enable Tauranga’s urban centres to thrive and provide a sense of place.

·        To enable the development of a vibrant, safe and successful city centre.

·        To ensure that council and partner investments in Tauranga’s built environment are economically and environmentally resilient.

Scope

·        Development of a multi-modal transport masterplan and associated programmes and network operating plans.

·        Development of the Future Development Strategy, urban settlement pattern and associated monitoring thereof.

·        Development and oversight of urban centres strategies, neighbourhood plans and master-plans.

·        Development and oversight of the Compact City programme in support of higher development densities and the provision of a greater range of housing options.

·        Leadership of plans for the city centre, including the Civic Rebuild programme.

·        Development of City Plan changes and related matters for adoption by Council.

·        Development of strategies, plans and programmes for the medium to long term delivery of social, environmental, economic, cultural and resilience outcomes.

Power to act

·        To make all decisions necessary to fulfil the role and scope of the Committee subject to the limitations imposed.

·        To establish subcommittees, working parties and forums as required.

·        To appoint a non-voting Tangata Whenua representative to the Committee.

Power to recommend

·        To Council and/or any standing committee as it deems appropriate.

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

Order Of Business

1         Apologies. 9

2         Public Forum.. 10

2.1            Public Forum - Ben Hague - On Demand Transport 10

3         Acceptance of Late Items. 11

4         Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open. 11

5         Change to Order of Business. 11

6         Confirmation of Minutes. 12

6.1            Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 1 September 2020. 12

7         Declaration of Conflicts of Interest 23

8         Deputations, Presentations, Petitions. 24

8.1            Presentation - Greenfield Urban Growth Planning Update. 24

8.2            Presentation - Freshwater Reforms. 25

9         Business. 26

9.1            Adoption of Plan Change 26 (Housing Choice) for Notification. 26

9.2            Adoption of Plan Change 27 (Flooding from Intense Rainfall) for Notification. 251

9.3            Adoption of Plan Change 30 (Earthworks) for Notification. 358

9.4            Te Papa Spatial Plan. 466

9.5            Transport & Water Strategy and Planning Projects Progress Report - October 2020. 551

10       Discussion of Late Items. 576

 

 


1          Apologies


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

2          Public Forum

2.1         Public Forum - Ben Hague - On Demand Transport   


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

3          Acceptance of Late Items

4          Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open

5          Change to Order of Business


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

6.1         Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 1 September 2020

File Number:           A11891718

Author:                    Jenny Teeuwen, Committee Advisor

Authoriser:              Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 1 September 2020 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

Attachments

1.      Minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting held on 1 September 2020 

  


UNCONFIRMEDUrban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Minutes

1 September 2020

 

 

MINUTES

Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting

Tuesday, 1 September 2020

 


Order Of Business

1         Apologies. 3

1.1            Apologies. 3

2         Public Forum.. 3

2.1            Desmond Heke - Kaitemako Maori Land - Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Study. 3

3         Acceptance of Late Items. 4

4         Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open. 4

5         Change to Order of Business. 4

6         Confirmation of Minutes. 4

6.1            Minutes, Open and Public Excluded, of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting held on 21 July 2020. 4

7         Declaration of Conflicts of Interest 4

8         Business. 5

8.1            Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Planning Study 2020. 5

8.2            Bay of Plenty Mode Shift Plan. 6

8.1            Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Planning Study 2020 (Continued) 7

8.3            Growth & Land Use Projects Progress Reports - September 2020. 8

9         Discussion of Late Items. 10

10       Public Excluded Session. 10

 

 

MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting

HELD AT THE Tauranga City Council, Council Chambers, 91 Willow Street, Tauranga

ON Tuesday, 1 September 2020 AT 9.30am

 

 

PRESENT:               Cr Larry Baldock (Chairperson), Cr Heidi Hughes (Deputy Chairperson), Mayor Tenby Powell, Cr Jako Abrie, Cr Kelvin Clout, Cr Bill Grainger, Cr Dawn Kiddie, Cr Andrew Hollis, Cr Steve Morris, Cr John Robson, Cr Tina Salisbury, and Mr Te Pio Kawe

 

IN ATTENDANCE: Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Nic Johansson (General Manager: Infrastructure), Christine Jones (General Manager: Strategy & Growth), Andy Mead (Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning), Steve Tuck (Policy Planner), Alistair Talbot (Team Leader: Transport Strategy & Planning), Peter Siemensma (Senior Transport Planner), Carl Lucca (Programme Director: Urban Communities), Janine Speedy (Team Leader: City Planning), Coral Hair (Manager: Democracy Services), Raj Naidu (Committee Advisor), and Jenny Teeuwen (Committee Advisor)

 

1          Apologies

1.1         Apologies

Committee Resolution  UR5/20/1

Moved:       Cr Kelvin Clout

Seconded:  Cr Dawn Kiddie

That the apology for lateness received from Cr Steve Morris be accepted.

Carried

 

 

2          Public Forum  

2.1         Desmond Heke - Kaitemako Maori Land - Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Study

 

At 9.34am, Cr Morris entered the meeting.

 

 

Key points

·             Mr Heke was accompanied by two trustees from a cluster of Māori land blocks, Kaitemako J2, N1, N2 and N.  The land was 113 hectares combined and zoned rural.

·             The land was included in the 2016 Te Puni Kokiri study and the 2017 Tauranga City Council’s (TCC) Welcome Bay and Ohauiti study.

·             Following a public meeting in July 2020, a number of landowners felt that they had been left out of the study.

·             Some of the constraints to developing the area had been the development of infrastructure.

·             Alternatives offered by the landowners had not been considered.

·             Engagement with landowners and Māori Land Trusts was key for information to be assessed and decided upon.

·             Requested that TCC consider a landowner engagement group, similar to a ratepayers association, that would be more representative of the administration of the land trust as well as the landowners.

·             Requested that TCC revisit the feasibility options of future urban development for the Kaitemako land blocks.

 

In response to questions

·             Hui with iwi, hapu and Māori Land Trusts were held following the council resolution to progress the study.  Follow up hui were held with iwi, hapu and Māori Land Trusts at the completion of the first two stages of the study.  A further update and next steps hui with iwi, hapu and the Māori Land Trusts had been held in the last six weeks.

 

 

 

3          Acceptance of Late Items

Nil

 

4          Confidential Business to be Transferred into the Open

Nil

 

5          Change to Order of Business

The Chairperson indicated that the order of business may need to change during the meeting to accommodate an external presenter from Waka Kotahi for Item 8.2 Bay of Plenty Mode Shift who was only available for a specified period of time.

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

6.1         Minutes, Open and Public Excluded, of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting held on 21 July 2020

Committee Resolution  UR5/20/2

Moved:       Mayor Tenby Powell

Seconded:  Cr Kelvin Clout

That the Urban Form and transport Development Committee:

(a)         confirms the Open minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting held on 21 July 2020 as a true and correct record. 

(b)         confirms the Public Excluded minutes of the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting held on 21 July 2020 as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

 

7          Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

Nil

 

8          Business

8.1         Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Planning Study 2020

Staff           Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

Steve Tuck, Policy Planner

 

A copy of the staff presentation for this item can be viewed on Tauranga City Council’s website in the Minutes Attachments document for this committee meeting.

 

Key points

·             The study had been driven by two factors – (i) this part of the city could have been planned better and was missing key facilities and amenities, and (ii), the significant interest in the growth areas for this part of the city and the feasibility of developing those areas further.

·             The catchment area for the study was north/south oriented and most of the development in the area fed off the north/south roads.  The area had only a few east/west road connections.

·             The land zonings had been set up in 1996 and had not changed significantly over time.  A review of the zones in 2013 indicated that the area was too constrained to warrant rezoning at that time.

·             The methodology for the study included two steps.  The first step identified what growth capacity was left in existing suburban residential zones and the second step identified land in rural areas that could be re-zoned residential.

·             Three population scenarios were developed to test infrastructure capacities:

(i)               Business as usual – around 1,300 dwellings

(ii)              Moderate growth – 3,100 dwellings (excluded multi-owned Māori land)

(iii)            High growth – 4,700 dwellings

·             The three waters assessment found that there were no real constraints for further growth for water and wastewater, but further investment would be required for the higher growth scenarios.  Stormwater would need to be assessed site by site and was beyond the high level scope of this study.

·             The commercial assessment found that there was enough demand from residents to support a supermarket or commercial centre but finding a site that was large enough, had the right topography and was located in the right area was difficult and would largely rely on the private market.

·             The Ministry of Education was keen to develop a fourth primary school in the Ohauiti area, but were not in favour of developing a secondary school in the study area.

·             More growth would require further parks and sports fields to be provided.

·             Three options for east/west link roads were modelled – north, central and south.  The modelling found that the central option would perform the best and this option was taken forward for detailed assessment.  All options ran through public, private and multi -owned Māori land and had planning, ecological and archaeological hurdles to overcome.

·             If Welcome Bay Road was to act as a conduit for more transport movements, the resilience of the corridor would need to be improved to ensure the community was not disrupted in a natural hazard event.

·             The upper Ohauiti urban growth area, approximately 66 hectares of general land, was less constrained than other feasible sub-precinct areas.

 

In response to questions

·             The minimum target for density was 15 houses per hectare.  The topography of the area made higher densities more difficult.

·             The site at the end of Rosedale Drive was zoned residential but was not included as it had no access or services.

·             Work on the greenfields plan changes for Te Tumu and Tauriko West included the issue around density and housing typologies and choice.  Once included in the City Plan changes, this could then be more broadly applied to other residential zones in the city.

·             Multi-owned Māori land only being included in the high growth scenario was mostly due to the availability of bringing Māori owned land to the open market.

·             The aspiration for Māori Trust land blocks was not necessarily for sale on the open market but to utilise the land for affordable housing options for the beneficiaries of the Trusts.

·             TCC would need to work through Method 18 requirements of the Regional Policy Statement to rezone land that was greater than 5 hectares in size.  There would be a significant struggle to move through that process with the identified constraints on infrastructure.

·             The Tangata Whenua committee would be the most appropriate avenue for a discussion and/or workshop regarding opportunities/challenges of developing multi-owned Māori land.  A workshop for the Mayor and Councillors could also be included as part of the next steps for the study.

·             The Ministry of Education would consider that the proposed primary school in the Ohauiti area be for years one to eight.

·             Costing of the central corridor transport option was carried out by Aurecon.

·             The cost per household for the business as usual scenario would be around $1,000 per household (little change to infrastructure required), but could escalate to between $70,000 to $100,000 per household for the higher level scenarios (significant acquisition of land and infrastructure required).

·             The benefits to the community for the full build-out option could be limited.

·             There was a greater cost escalation risk with the type of the terrain in the study area than in other growth areas of the city that were flat.

·             Investment in Welcome Bay Road would need to continue to improve resilience.

·             The Adler Drive special housing area had 185 houses that were already consented.  The areas could accommodate around 500-600 more houses.  Commercial and community needs for this area would be considered in the structure planning exercise.

Attachment

1       Presentation - Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Planning Study 2020

 

 

Committee Resolution  UR5/20/3

Moved:       Cr Larry Baldock

Seconded:  Mayor Tenby Powell

That the recommendations for Item 8.1 be left to lie on the table until later in the meeting.

Carried

 

 

At 11.30am, the meeting adjourned.

 

 

At 11.45am, the meeting resumed.

 

 

8.2         Bay of Plenty Mode Shift Plan

Staff           Alistair Talbot, Team Leader: Transport Strategy & Planning

Peter Siemensma, Senior Transport Planner

 

External     Cole O’Keefe, Waka Kotahi (New Zealand Transport Agency – NZTA)

 

Key points

·             The Mode Shift Plan was a national initiative.

·             The plan was developed in partnership with Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC), Western Bay of Plenty District Council (WBOPDC) and Waka Kotahi (NZTA).

·             The plan was for the whole of the Bay of Plenty but focussed on the Western Bay sub-region at this time.

·             The plan was a collation of existing plans, strategies and policies, including the Urban Form and Transport Initiative (UFTI) and the Western Bay Transport System Plan (TSP).

 

In response to questions

·             The initial focus was on high growth centres and these plans were required to be completed by the end of August 2020 so the Western Bay sub-region part of the plan was completed first to meet the August deadline.

·             Community engagement and consultation with communities was built into the project to help understand the travel needs and demands of those communities.

·             An ‘on demand’ public transport option would be considered as part of the TSP for those areas of the city that could suit that option.

·             Encouraging the use of other modes of travel would create capacity for all users on the network, including vehicles.  This plan was looking at non-private vehicle modes.  The TSP would look at all vehicles and public transport.

 

Committee Resolution  UR5/20/4

Moved:       Mayor Tenby Powell

Seconded:  Cr Larry Baldock

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Receives the report.

(b)     Endorses the draft Bay of Plenty Mode Shift Plan Regional Framework and Western Bay of Plenty section.

(c)     Notes that the Rotorua and Eastern Bay of Plenty sub-regional sections of the Mode Shift Plan are still to be developed.

In Favour:       Mayor Tenby Powell, Crs Larry Baldock, Heidi Hughes, Jako Abrie, Kelvin Clout, Bill Grainger, Dawn Kiddie, Steve Morris, John Robson, Tina Salisbury, and Te Pio Kawe

Against:           Nil

Abstained:       Cr Andrew Hollis

carried 11/0

Carried

 

 

The recommendations for item 8.1 which had been left to lie on the table earlier in the meeting, were then put.

 

8.1         Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Planning Study 2020 (Continued)

Committee Resolution  UR5/20/5

Moved:       Cr John Robson

Seconded:  Mayor Tenby Powell

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Receives the report titled Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Planning Study 2020;

(b)     Adopts the report and recommendations set out in the Welcome Bay and Ohauiti Planning Study 2020 (Attachment 1) as follows:

(i)      Do not proceed with structure planning for additional urban development in the Welcome Bay area because of transport constraints and costs;

(ii)     Subject to positive outcomes of discussions with relevant landowners and preliminary structure planning investigations, approve completion of a structure plan and the rezoning of the Upper Ohauiti growth area that is within the current Tauranga City boundary through the Tauranga City Plan Review project;

(iii)     Continue engagement with Māori Land Trusts collectively and individually in the study area in relation to future housing and land use options as part of the Tauranga City Plan Review project and through all other avenues including a further workshop with elected members;

(iv)    Notes that the project plan for the City Plan Review project has been endorsed by the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee which includes a tangata whenua and Māori engagement plan and resources to support tangata whenua with this engagement;

(v)     Examine options to improve transport choice, connectivity and support predictable travel times in the Study Area through the Transport System Plan and structure planning of Upper Ohauiti;

(vi)    Seek to address the undersupply of commercial land in the Study Area through the Tauranga City Plan Review project;

(vii)    Continue working with the Ministry of Education on planning for a new primary school in the Ohauiti area;

(viii)   Continue to advocate to the Ministry of Education for better Year 7-13 schooling options within the Study Area to reduce pressure on the transport network at peak periods, noting that the Ministry of Education has other priorities for secondary schooling and is not currently planning for a secondary school in the Study Area;

(ix)    Continue to investigate the provision of new sportsfields in Ohauiti to meet existing demand; and

(x)     Investigate options for the upgrade or redevelopment of the Welcome Bay Community Hall and Centre as part of the Community Facilities Investment Plan being prepared for Council’s Long-Term Plan 2021 - 2031 and 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy with a view to future improvement of this facility, potentially around 2030.

Carried

 

 

At 12.29pm, the meeting adjourned.

 

 

At 1pm, the meeting resumed.

 

 

8.3         Growth & Land Use Projects Progress Reports - September 2020

Staff           Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

Carl Lucca, Programme Director: Urban Communities

Janine Speedy, Team Leader: City Planning

 

A copy of the staff presentation for this item can be viewed on Tauranga City Council’s website in the Minutes Attachments document for this committee meeting.

 

 

Key points

·             The three plan changes underway in relation to housing choice, flooding from intense rainfall, and earthworks were on track.

·             The Te Papa Spatial Plan was also on track to be completed for adoption in October.

·             The Local Government Commission had confirmed the transfer of land from WBOPDC to TCC in Tauriko West.  The TCC land area would increase by approximately 6.6 square kilometres.

·             The Tauranga Northern Link (TNL) project was moving at pace and a Smith’s Farm cost sharing Memorandum of Understanding with NZTA would need to be confirmed in September or October 2020.

·             The independent report on the review of the Resource Management Act (RMA) system had been released.  The proposed changes were substantive and would provide uncertainty around TCC’s City Plan Review project.

·             The government’s National Policy Statement for Urban Development (NPS-UD) had been released.  Overall the content was largely as expected and consistent with work TCC was currently undertaking.  Key points included:

-             The NPS-UD set out the objectives and policies for urban development under the RMA.

-             Was approved on 23 July 2020 and came into effect on 20 August 2020.

-             Councils would be required to enable greater height and density, and remove policies and rules relating to minimum car parks.

-             Councils would also be required to provide greater consideration to housing affordability and climate change.

-             Councils must use a strong evidence base for their decision making and ensure they engage with Māori, developers and infrastructure providers.

·             The government’s National Policy Statement and National Environment Standard for Freshwater Management had also been released.

 

In response to questions

·             Three new acts were proposed to replace the RMA – Environment and Urban Planning Act, Strategic Planning Act and a Climate Change based Act.  The government position on these was not yet known.

·             The process for plan changes or for private plan changes to be considered by the council remained unchanged at this stage.

·             If a regional based planning instrument was created, it was expected that timeframes for district or regional plan changes would need to be reviewed.

·             The lack of an overall population study for New Zealand contributed to gaps at different levels for key infrastructure.

·             Information regarding the changes to the NPS-UD would be included in the community engagement process for the plan changes currently underway.

·             How the NPS-UD would be implemented and communicated across the region would be the topic at an upcoming meeting with WBOPDC and BOPRC.

·             TCC would be one of the first councils to fully comply with the NPS-UD in terms of car park requirements.

·             There had been no approach to TCC yet regarding the Covid-19 fast-track consenting.

·             A two-hour drop-in session with councillors to enable questions around the three plan changes would be set up prior to the October Urban Form and Transport Development (UFTD) Committee meeting.

·             Opening up Te Tumu required the Papamoa East Interchange to be constructed.  This would be a key part of the Long Term Plan (LTP).

·             Work continued with Hamilton City Council on a joint consulting report dealing with housing choice and densities in greenfield areas.  The draft report would be brought back to a UFTD Committee meeting later in the year.

·             The Mayor believed that the need for more alignment of policy statements between territorial authorities, regional authorities and the government was recognised and understood by Ministers.

·             Brownfields were often large previous industrial sites. Tauranga did not currently have brownfield sites in the city.  The correct term for intensification was greyfields.

 

Committee Resolution  UR5/20/6

Moved:       Mayor Tenby Powell

Seconded:  Cr Kelvin Clout

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee receives the Growth & Land Use Projects Progress Report – September 2020.

Carried

Attachment

1       Presentation - NPS-UD Update

 

 

9          Discussion of Late Items

Nil

 

10        Public Excluded Session

Nil

 

 

The meeting closed at 2.03pm.

 

The minutes of this meeting were confirmed at the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting held on 13 October 2020.

 

 

...................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

7          Declaration of Conflicts of Interest


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

8          Deputations, Presentations, Petitions

8.1         Presentation - Greenfield Urban Growth Planning Update

File Number:           A11841121

Author:                    Gareth Pottinger, Project Leader: Urban Planning

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

 

Purpose of the PRESENTATION

To provide the Mayor and Councillors with an update on the greenfield urban growth planning projects.

 

 

 

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

8.2         Presentation - Freshwater Reforms

File Number:           A11867463

Author:                    Claudia Hellberg, Team Leader: Waters Strategy & Planning

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

 

Purpose of the PRESENTATION

To provide the Mayor and Councillors with an update on freshwater reforms.

 

 

  


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

9          Business

9.1         Adoption of Plan Change 26 (Housing Choice) for Notification

File Number:           A11815856

Author:                    Corinne Frischknecht, Senior Policy Planner

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to seek a recommendation for Council to adopt proposed Plan Change 26 (Housing Choice) for the purposes of notification.

Recommendations

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Recommends to Council adoption of Plan Change 26 (Housing Choice) to the operative Tauranga City Plan for public notification. 

(b)     Authorises the General Manager: Strategy & Growth to arrange the public notification process in accordance with the provisions of the First Schedule to the Resource Management Act 1991, once the Plan Change has been adopted by Council.

(c)     Delegates authority to the General Manager: Strategy & Growth to approve any minor and technical changes to the Proposed Text Amendments contained in Attachment 2, as required prior to public notification.

(d)     Endorses the non-statutory urban design guide (Residential Outcomes Framework) for consultation.

 

Executive Summary

2.      In accordance with direction received from the City Transformation Committee (3 September 2018, DC 263) staff have progressed Plan Change 26 to the operative Tauranga City Plan to enable greater housing choice and residential density in existing urban areas.

3.      Plan Change 26 (Housing Choice) has now been prepared to the point of notification.

4.      The adoption of Plan Change 26 by Council for public notification for submissions under Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 is sought.

Background

5.      The operative Tauranga City Plan is a constantly evolving document because it is required to facilitate future growth demands and respond to resource management issues as they arise. This is recognised and provided for in the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA), through the Plan Change process, which enables changes to city plans outside of the ‘whole of plan review’ process.

6.      At the City Transformation Committee meeting on 3 September 2018 (DC263), it was decided to proceed with the development of individual plan changes relating to:

·        A review of the Issues, Objectives and Policies for Residential and Commercial Zones to support targeted intensification through resource consent processes ahead of implementation of the Tauranga Urban Strategy.

7.      The Tauranga Urban Strategy identified a number of implementation actions. One of the key actions identified was the development of a Te Papa Spatial Plan that would then inform changes to the City Plan. A number of other actions were also identified. Of relevance to PPC26, three short term actions were identified;

·        An objectives and policies plan change to give greater support, clarity for developments that allow more homes within the existing urban areas;

·        A City Living Zone plan change to better align rules to support development opportunities for more intensive residential development close to the City Centre; and

·        A Plan Change to address water-based hazard management (PPC27);

·        A Spatial Framework across the Te Papa peninsula to identify opportunities to build on and improve the live/learn/work/play opportunities in this part of the city. This will include identifying locations where more housing may be enabled, while also identifying improvements needed across the peninsula.

8.      As outlined in the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting on 23 July 2019 (DC194) the extent of the Intensification Plan Changes (PC26 and PC28) includes the following workstreams:

·        Duplexes and low-rise comprehensive development provisions widely across the city; and

·        Medium rise comprehensive development provisions limited to the Te Papa peninsula, aligning with the Te Papa Spatial Framework.

9.      At this meeting, Council resolved to endorse the development of detailed provisions for future public notification.

10.    Through the work that has been undertaken by staff and discussions that have been held with key stakeholders, the decision was made to include all work streams in one Plan Change (Plan Change 26) for notification.

11.    In accordance with the direction received from the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee, staff have completed the preparation of proposed Plan Change 26 (Housing Choice) along with the accompanying section 32 analysis as required under the RMA.

12.    The section 32 analysis is a detailed assessment required by the RMA to establish whether the proposed Plan Change content is the most appropriate course of action. The section 32 analysis is included as Attachment 1. It is noted that the appendices to Attachment 1 will be available in a separate attachment document to this agenda.

13.    The proposed Plan Change covers the following key aspects:

·        Suburban Residential Zone

(i)      Enable duplexes and comprehensively designed development (in the form of terraces / townhouses).

·        Te Papa Peninsula:

(i)      Enable duplex dwellings and comprehensively designed development (terraces/townhouses/apartments) through the introduction of the Te Papa Housing Overlay and amended City Living Zone provisions. The provisions of the zone and the overlay are to be aligned to achieve the same built form outcomes; The extent of the Te Papa Housing Overlay is attached as Appendix 14H to the provisions included as Attachment 2.

(ii)     Increase height limits in the Commercial Zone in Te Papa to align with height limits of surrounding residential activities.

·        Commercial Zone:

(i)      Introduce on-site amenity and urban design provisions for residential activities.

14.    Through this process, staff are also proposing to introduce a new non-statutory urban design guide known as the Residential Outcomes Framework. The key aspects of this guide have been pulled through into the objectives, policies and assessment criteria in proposed Plan Change 26. This will be applied to the comprehensively designed developments and residential activities in the Commercial Zone. This approach will support good built form outcomes and ensure that higher density residential development achieves high quality on and off-site amenity. Staff recommend that this document will be endorsed after public consultation, when adoption of the plan change is sought as amendments may be appropriate subject to the outcomes of the PPC26 submissions, hearings and appeals process. The Residential Outcomes Framework is attached as Appendix 15 to the section 32 report included as Attachment 1.

15.    Section 75(3)(c) of the RMA states that a change to a district plan must give effect to any Regional Policy Statement (RPS). To give effect to the natural hazard provisions of the Bay of Plenty RPS, a city-wide natural hazards assessment was undertaken. The outcome has resulted in where and how proposed Plan Change 26 is able to be implemented. That being where a low-level risk is able to be achieved on site to give effect to the RPS. Further consideration on how the City Plan gives effect to the RPS with the view to enabling proposed Plan Change 26 to apply more broadly across the Suburban Residential Zone will be determined as part of the City Plan Review project.

16.    The proposed text amendments to the City Plan are included as Attachment 2.

17.    Consideration was given to using the Streamline Planning Process as an alternative to the standard RMA Part 1 Schedule 1 process. This consenting pathway was endorsed at the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting on 20 August 2019 (DC 264). However, staff did not proceed with an application to the Minister as the required timeframes could not be met in order to receive a direction before the General Election. Subsequently, it is proposed to use the standard process under Part 1 of Schedule 1 of the RMA.

18.    The adoption of Plan Change 26 by Council for public notification for submissions under Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 is sought.

19.    Public notification will occur with the opportunity to make a submission prior to the end of 2020 and further submissions in early 2021.

20.    Following public notification, hearings will be held to consider any submissions received. A hearing for proposed Plan Change 26 and recommendations to Council will occur in accordance with sections 34A, 39 and 39B and the First Schedule of the RMA and fall within the role and scope of the Hearing Panel.

21.    During the submissions and further submissions process, approval will be sought from Council for the appointment of a Hearings Panel or an Independent Hearings Commissioner to hear and make recommendations on the Plan Change to Council.  This will include whether there is elected member involvement as part of a Hearings Panel.

Strategic / Statutory Context

22.    The provision of a good supply and variety of housing to meet market demand over time is a key part of the overall city growth objectives. Proposed Plan Change 26 partially addresses residential development capacity constraints and contributes towards achieving the targets for housing development capacity as set out in the City Plan and the RPS.

23.    The proposed Plan Change delivers on a more compact city, particularly in the Te Papa peninsula, as outlined in the draft Future Development Strategy, draft Tauranga Urban Strategy and Urban Form and Transport Initiative.

24.    Intensification of existing urban areas and enabling up to six (6) storeys in the Te Papa peninsula gives effect to higher order documents; in particular the National Policy Statement for Urban Development and the Regional Policy Statement.

25.    As part of Crown Infrastructure Partners Limited program (CIP) the Government is investing $45 million in the first stage of redeveloping Cameron Road into an urban corridor and the creation of a public transport link between Pyes Pa/Tauriko and the Tauranga CBD. The notification of Plan Change 26 is important as it demonstrates the Council’s commitment to delivering on the direction set out in the funding application.

Options Analysis

26.    Option 1: Adopt the Plan Change as per the attachments to this report. Proceeding with proposed Plan Change 26 will provide for greater housing choice and residential density in existing urban areas. This Plan Change will result in a more effective and efficient City Plan, and alignment with higher level planning documents that Council has a statutory obligation to give effect to.

27.    Option 2: to retain the status quo. There is sufficient information to indicate that housing capacity and affordability continues to be a significant issue in Tauranga City.  Status quo will continue to provide a complex consenting approach for more intensive housing development and its related resource consent and application costs, risks and uncertainties. Retaining the status quo will not deliver on the targets for housing development capacity as set out in Section 2A.3 of the City Plan and RPS, nor give effect to higher level planning documents such as the National Policy Statement for Urban Development.

28.    These two options are further discussed in the section 32 analysis included as Attachment 1. Staff recommend proceeding with Option 1.

Financial Considerations

29.    There are no financial considerations associated with this report. The cost associated with the preparation of Plan Change 26 is within existing LTP budgets.

Legal Implications / Risks

30.    A full legal review has been undertaken of the Section 32 report included as Attachment 1 and the proposed text amendments included as Attachment 2 to ensure that the documents meet the legislative requirements under Schedule 1 of the RMA.

Consultation / Engagement

31.    Plan changes are required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to be publicly notified for submissions and further submissions. This is in addition to the engagement process that has already been undertaken as part of the development of proposed Plan Change 26.

Significance

32.    Under the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy, this decision is of high significance that has high public interest and effects:

·        large areas of the Tauranga community, being the Suburban Residential, City Living and Commercial zones; excluding areas identified for their high natural hazard risk; and

·        a subgroup within the Tauranga community and the Te Papa Spatial Framework area from the central business district to Greerton.

33.    This project also flows from previous direction provided by Council.

34.    Proposed Plan Change 26 is required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to be publicly notified for submission and further submissions.

Next Steps

35.    The finalised proposed Plan Change and the accompanying section 32 analysis will be publicly notified in accordance with the requirements of Schedule 1 of the RMA.

36.    Following the submission and further submission process, the proposed Plan Change is required to proceed to a hearing and recommendation process.

37.    During the submissions and further submissions process, approval will be sought from Council for the appointment of a Hearings Panel or an Independent Hearings Commissioner to hear and make recommendations on the Plan Change to Council.  This will include whether there is elected member involvement as part of a Hearings Panel.

38.    The decision to adopt those recommendations will rest with Council following the hearing of submissions and receipt of the Hearing Panel or Independent Hearings Commissioner(s) recommendation report.

39.    It is anticipated that decisions on the Plan Change will occur in the 2021 calendar year following recommendations being made to Council by a Hearings Panel or Independent Hearings Committee. 

Attachments

1.      Proposed Text Amendments - Plan Change 26 - A11850346

2.      Section 32 - Analysis -  Plan Change 26 - A11849271

3.      Section 32 - Appendices - Plan Change 26 - Part 1 - A11890426 (supplementary document)  

4.      Section 32 - Appendices - Plan Change 26 - Part 2 - A11890428 (supplementary document)  

5.      Section 32 - Appendices - Plan Change 26 - Part 3 - A11890430 (supplementary document)  

6.      Section 32 - Appendices - Plan Change 26 - Part 4 - A11890432 (supplementary document)    


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 


 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

9.2         Adoption of Plan Change 27 (Flooding from Intense Rainfall) for Notification

File Number:           A11826739

Author:                    Manasi Vaidya, Policy Planner

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to seek a recommendation for Council to adopt proposed Plan Change 27 (Flooding from Intense Rainfall) for the purposes of notification.

Recommendations

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Recommends to Council adoption of Plan Change 27 (Flooding from Intense Rainfall) to the operative Tauranga City Plan for public notification.  

(b)     Authorises the General Manager: Strategy & Growth to arrange the public notification process in accordance with the provisions of the First Schedule to the Resource Management Act 1991; once the Plan Change has been adopted by Council.

(c)     Delegates authority to the General Manager: Strategy & Growth to approve any minor and technical changes to the Proposed Text Amendments contained in Attachment 2, as required prior to public notification. 

(d)     Endorses the non-statutory guidance document (Flooding from Intense Rainfall Guideline) for consultation.

(e)     Notes the provisions in Plan Change 27 (Flooding from Intense Rainfall) as having legal effect from the time of public notification under Section 86B(3)(a) of the Resource Management Act 1991.

 

Executive Summary

2.      In accordance with direction received from the City Transformation Committee (3 December 2018, DC349) staff have progressed Plan Change 27 to the operative Tauranga City Plan to reduce the risk of flooding from intense rainfall in Tauranga. 

3.      Plan Change 27 (Flooding from Intense Rainfall) has now been prepared to the point of notification.

4.      The adoption of Plan Change 27 by Council for public notification for submissions under Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 is sought.                                             

Background

5.      The operative Tauranga City Plan is a constantly evolving document because it is required to facilitate future growth demands and respond to resource management issues as they arise. This is recognised and provided for in the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA), through the Plan Change process, which enables changes to city plans outside of the ‘whole of plan review’ process.

6.      Following the 2005 and 2013 floods in Tauranga, the Integrated Stormwater Project was adopted by Tauranga City Council (TCC) through the Long-Term Plan (2015-25). TCC resolved to take a risk reduction approach to stormwater management as an outcome of this project, which included undertaking flood modelling to identify flood risk in Tauranga and the development of a regulatory response to reduce the risk of flooding.

7.      TCC has continued to model flood risk to identify the existing and projected future risk of flooding from 100-year Annual Recurrence Interval (ARI) intense rainfall events and building floor levels have also been surveyed across the City to enable risk (likelihood times consequence) to be calculated.

8.      Plan Change 27 is the regulatory response to the wider Integrated Stormwater Project.

9.      At the City Transformation Committee meeting on 3 December 2018 (DC349), it was decided to proceed with the development of a plan change relating to reducing the Citywide risk of flooding from intense rainfall.

10.    In accordance with the direction received from the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee, staff have completed the preparation of proposed Plan Change 27 (Flooding from Intense Rainfall) along with the accompanying section 32 analysis as required under the RMA.

11.    The section 32 analysis is a detailed assessment required by the RMA to establish whether the proposed Plan Change content is the most appropriate course of action. The section 32 analysis is included as Attachment 1. It is noted that the appendices to Attachment 1 will be available in a separate attachment document to this agenda.

12.    The proposed Plan Change seeks to:

·        Protect floodplains and overland flowpaths;

·        Manage development and redevelopment within flood prone areas;

·        Manage displacement effects, earthworks and floor levels; and

·        Control impervious surfaces in the Suburban Residential, Large Lot and City Living zones.

13.    Through this process, staff are also proposing to introduce a new non-statutory guidance document known as Flooding from Intense Rainfall Guideline, to aid in using and implementing the provisions introduced by the proposed Plan Change. This will be applied to land use, development and subdivision undertaken within floodplains, overland flowpaths and flood prone areas, as well as for managing maximum impervious surfaces in Suburban Residential, Large Lot and City Living Zones. This approach will enable developers and property owners to assess and mitigate or avoid the risk of flooding on and off-site, to achieve risk reduction over time. Staff recommend that this document will be endorsed after public consultation, when adoption of the plan change is sought as it may be appropriate to make amendments to the document based on outcomes of the plan change process.

14.    Section 75(3)(c) of the RMA states that a change to a district plan must give effect to any Regional Policy Statement (RPS). An assessment of the Bay of Plenty RPS Natural Hazards objectives and policies has identified that development and redevelopment trigger the need for a risk assessment and a methodology to reduce the risk of flooding to demonstrate compliance with the RPS.

15.    Existing TCC flood models were used to undertake Citywide risk assessments for the 1% AEP rainfall event taking into account the effects of climate change based on the RCP 8.5 median scenario as of the year 2130. The outcome of these assessments is that all 19 modelled catchments in Tauranga are at High risk from flooding. TCC is required to reduce the flood risk from High to Medium risk or as low as reasonably practicable over time.

16.    There are no existing objectives or policies in the City Plan which manage flooding from intense rainfall.

17.    Proposed Plan Change 27 has been advanced to introduce provisions to provide an appropriate regulatory pathway for developers and landowners to avoid or mitigate the risk of flooding thus achieving risk reduction over time to give effect to the RPS. The rule framework proposed in Plan Change 27 will be supported by an online mapping tool that will be made available for ease of reference of where the floodplains, overland flowpaths and flood prone areas are located across the city.

18.    The mapping exercise undertaken for Plan Change 27 has identified that approximately 30,416 properties in Tauranga will be affected by flooding from intense rainfall.

19.    The proposed text amendments to the Tauranga City Plan are included as Attachment 2.

20.    Consideration was given to using the Streamline Planning Process as an alternative to the standard RMA Part 1 Schedule 1 process. This consenting pathway was endorsed at the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting on 20 August 2019 (DC 264). However, staff did not proceed with an application to the Minister as the required timeframes could not be met in order to receive a direction before the upcoming General Election. Subsequently, it is proposed to use the standard process under Part 1 of Schedule 1 of the RMA.

21.    The adoption of Plan Change 27 by Council for public notification for submissions under Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 is sought.

22.    Public notification will occur with the opportunity to make a submission prior to the end of 2020 and further submissions in early 2021.

23.    Following public notification, hearings will be held to consider any submissions received. A hearing for proposed Plan Change 27 and recommendations to Council will occur in accordance with sections 34A, 39 and 39B and the First Schedule of the RMA fall within the role and scope of the Hearing Panel.

24.    After the submissions and further submissions have been received, approval will be sought from Council for the appointment of a Hearings Panel or an Independent Hearings Commissioner to hear and make recommendations on the Plan Change to Council.  This will include consideration of the role of elected members as part of a Hearings Panel.

Strategic / Statutory Context

25.    Section 6 of the RMA identifies that the management of significant risks from natural hazards is of national importance. Flooding from intense rainfall is within the scope of management of natural hazards and TCC is required to recognise and provide for the management of this risk.

26.    The provision of housing to meet market demand over time is a key part of the overall city growth objectives. To provide for this demand, as required by the RPS and the National Policy Statement for Urban Development, TCC is progressing multiple plan changes including plan changes for greenfield areas (Te Tumu and Tauriko West) and for intensification within existing urban areas (proposed Plan Change 26 - Housing Choice).

27.    Plan Changes to accommodate growth trigger the need for consideration of the natural hazards policies of the RPS. The RPS requires a low natural hazard risk to be achieved on development sites after completion of the development and overall Citywide risk reduction. Proposed Plan Change 27 gives effect to the natural hazard objectives within the RPS. This is discussed further in the section 32 analysis included as Attachment 1.

28.    Plan Change 27 will provide a regulatory framework that supports a resilient community from flooding and facilitates the progression of Plan Change 26 (Housing Choice).

Options Analysis

29.    Option 1: retain the status quo. There are no specific objectives or policies in the City Plan to manage flooding from intense rainfall events. This option does not reduce risk and therefore does not give effect to the RPS.  It would also compromise the ability to make Plan Change 26 (Housing Choice) operative.

30.    Option 2: adopt the Plan Change as per the attachments to this report. This Option will have immediate legal effect under Section 86B(3) of the RMA. Proceeding with the Plan Change will reduce the risk of flooding from intense rainfall and give effect to the RPS. This Plan Change will result in a more effective and efficient City Plan.  It will also assist in completing Plan Change 26.

31.    The two options are further discussed in the section 32 analysis included as Attachment 1.  Staff recommend proceeding with Option 2.

 Financial Considerations

32.    There are no financial considerations associated with this report. The cost associated with the preparation of Plan Change 27 is within existing LTP budgets.

Legal Implications / Risks

33.    A full legal review has been undertaken of the Section 32 report included as Attachment 1 and the proposed text amendments included as Attachment 2 to ensure that the documents meet the legislative requirements under Schedule 1 of the RMA.

34.    Section 86B(3) of the RMA states that proposed rules have immediate legal effect if the rules protect or relate, “to water, air, or soil (for soil conservation)”. Proposed Plan Change 27 relates to water, therefore the provisions will have legal effect from public notification.

Consultation / Engagement

35.    Plan changes are required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to be publicly notified for submissions and further submissions. This is in addition to the engagement process that has already been undertaken as part of the development of proposed Plan Change 27.

Significance

36.    Under the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy, this decision is of medium significance for the following reason:

(a)     This Plan Change affects a subgroup, where it applies to properties affected by flooding from intense rainfall. The impervious surfaces rule also affects a subgroup where it will apply to all properties located in the City Living Zone, Suburban Residential Zone and Large Lot Residential Zone.

(b)     The Plan Change is giving effect to the RPS, which requires risk reduction to be demonstrated prior to development occurring in Tauranga.

37.    This project also flows from previous direction provided by Council.

38.    Proposed Plan Change 27 is required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to be publicly notified for submission and further submissions

Next Steps

39.    The finalised proposed Plan Change and the accompanying section 32 analysis will be publicly notified in accordance with the requirements of Schedule 1 of the RMA.

40.    As set out in Section 86B(3) of the RMA, the Plan Change will have legal effect at notification because the rule relate to water.

41.    Following the submission and further submission process, the proposed Plan Change is required to proceed to a hearing and recommendation process.

42.    After the submissions and further submissions have been received, approval will be sought from Council for the appointment of a Hearings Panel or an Independent Hearings Commissioner to hear and make recommendations on the Plan Change to Council.  This will include consideration of the role of elected members as part of a Hearings Panel.

43.    The decision to adopt those recommendations will rest with Council following the hearing of submissions and receipt of the Hearing Panel or Independent Hearings Commissioner(s) recommendation report.

44.    It is anticipated that decisions on the Plan Change will occur in the 2021 calendar year following recommendations being made to Council by Hearings Panel or Independent Hearings Committee. 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.      Proposed Text Amendments - Plan Change 27 - A11866967

2.      Section 32 - Analysis - Plan Change 27 - A11848541

3.      Section 32 - Appendices - Plan Change 27 - A11890437 - (Supplementary Document)

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 


 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 


 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

9.3         Adoption of Plan Change 30 (Earthworks) for Notification

File Number:           A11826282

Author:                    Karen Steer, Planner

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to seek the adoption of proposed Plan Change 30 (Earthworks) for the purposes of notification.

Recommendations

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Recommends to Council adoption of Plan Change 30 (Earthworks) to the operative Tauranga City Plan for public notification.

(b)     Authorises the General Manager: Strategy & Growth to arrange the public notification process in accordance with the provisions of the First Schedule to the Resource Management Act 1991; once the Plan Change has been adopted by Council.

(c)     Delegates authority to the General Manager: Strategy & Growth to approve any minor and technical changes to the Proposed Text Amendments contained in Attachment 2, as required prior to public notification.

(d)     Endorse the non-statutory guidance document (Sediment and erosion control guideline) for consultation.

 

Executive Summary

2.      In accordance with direction received from the City Transformation Committee (3 December 2018, DC349) staff have progressed Plan Change 30 (Earthworks) to the operative Tauranga City Plan to address issues arising from the implementation of existing earthworks provisions.

3.      Plan Change 30 (Earthworks) has now been prepared to the point of notification.

4.      The adoption of Plan Change 30 by Council for public notification for submissions under Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 is sought.

Background

5.      The operative Tauranga City Plan is a constantly evolving document because it is required to facilitate future growth demands and respond to resource management issues as they arise. This is recognised and provided for in the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA), through the plan change process, which enables changes to city plans outside of the ‘whole of plan review’ process.

6.      At the City Transformation Committee meeting on 3 September 2018 (DC263), it was decided to proceed with the development of individual plan changes prior to the full review of the City Plan.

7.      At the City Transformation Committee meeting on 3 December 2018 (DC349), it was decided to proceed with the development of a plan change in respect of earthworks and related matters.  The plan change was to consider the technical and timing issues of earthworks in subdivision and land use, and address ‘gaps’ in the City Plan that impact on sediment control.

8.      In accordance with the direction received from the City Transformation Committee in December, Council engaged Enspire to undertake additional research in accordance with section 35 of the RMA. This is to review the efficiency and effectiveness of earthworks policies, rules, or other methods in order to effectively carry out Council’s functions under the RMA.

9.      Results of research undertaken by Enspire were outlined in the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee meeting on 23 July 2019 (DC193) and included the outcome of engagement with key stakeholders.

10.    Through work undertaken to understand the efficiency and effectiveness of the existing earthworks provisions, it has been identified that whilst there are not significant issues, ambiguities with current wording leads to uncertainty for implementation and difficulties with enforcement.

11.    A technical plan change with limited scope has been advanced to amend the existing rules to provide clarification and align with the intent of the original rules.

12.    The section 32 analysis is a detailed assessment required by the RMA to establish whether the proposed plan change content is the most appropriate course of action.  The section 32 analysis and supporting documentation is included as Attachment 1.

13.    The proposed plan change covers the following matters:

·    Control of earthworks at all stages of development – involving the clarification of when earthworks as part of subdivision are exempt from permitted activity controls, and ensuring that when earthworks are ancillary to another activity that they are carried out at the same time as that activity;

·    Management of sediment on sites – involving the provision of a comprehensive set of measures to ensure sediment is kept on sites and is prevented from entering Council’s stormwater system.

14.    The proposed text amendments to the Tauranga City Plan are included as Attachment 2.

15.    Through this process, staff are also proposing to introduce a non-statutory sediment and erosion control guideline.  This approach will support developers and landowners to understand the methods to keep sediment on sites.  Staff recommend that this document will be endorsed after public consultation, when adoption of the plan change is sought as amendments to the document may be appropriate based on the outcomes of the PPC30 submissions, hearings and appeals process.  The sediment and erosion control guideline is attached as Appendix 4 to the section 32 report included as Attachment 1.

16.    The adoption of Plan Change 30 by Council for public notification for submissions under Schedule 1 of the Resource Management Act 1991 is sought.

17.    Public notification will occur with the opportunity to make a submission prior to the end of 2020 and further submissions in early 2021.

18.    Following public notification, hearings will be held to consider any submissions received. A hearing for proposed Plan Change 30 and recommendations to Council will occur in accordance with sections 34A, 39 and 39B and the First Schedule of the RMA, falling within the role and scope of a Hearings Panel or an Independent Commissioner.

Strategic / Statutory Context

19.    Improvements to how the City Plan operates plays a key part in meeting the purpose of the RMA, being the sustainable management of natural and physical resources.  The proposed plan change will improve the implementation of existing earthworks provisions within the City Plan.

Options Analysis

20.    Option 1: Retain the status quo.  The current ambiguity in the City Plan provisions allows earthworks to be undertaken in a manner which is inconsistent with the outcomes envisaged by City Plan objectives and policies, and without consideration of adverse effects on adjacent properties and the wider environment.

21.    Option 2: Technical amendments to provisions in Chapter 4 – Earthworks and Chapter 12 – Subdivision to provide clarification of the earthworks rules to ensure that the effects of earthworks are managed in an efficient and effective manner and better support existing objectives and policies within the City Plan.  The amendments provide a direct response to problems encountered with the existing framework.

22.    Option 3: Review the entire earthworks chapter.  Benefits of a comprehensive review of the earthworks chapter must be qualified against the high degree of interconnection earthworks has with other chapters of the City Plan.  It is more efficient to include the comprehensive review of earthworks within the full City Plan review.

23.    The three options are further discussed in the section 32 analysis included as Attachment 1.  Staff recommend proceeding with Option 2.

Financial Considerations

24.    There are no financial considerations associated with this report. The cost associated with the preparation of proposed Plan Change 30 is within existing LTP budgets.

Legal Implications / Risks

25.    A full legal review has been undertaken of the Section 32 report included as Attachment 1 and the proposed text amendments to the Tauranga City Plan included as Attachment 2 to ensure that the documents meet the legislative requirements under Schedule 1 of the RMA.

Consultation / Engagement

26.    Plan changes are required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to be publicly notified for submissions and further submissions. This is in addition to the engagement process that has already been undertaken as part of the development of proposed Plan Change 30.

Significance

27.    Under the TCC Significance and Engagement Policy this decision is of low significance for the following reasons:

·    the plan change has wide geographic location (relates to city-wide earthworks), however the magnitude and importance of effects associated with the plan change are limited, involving technical changes to existing rules;

·    the plan change is likely to have limited public interest;

·    the amendments provide clarification of existing rules to ensure the requirements and the original intent of the rules are fully understood;

·    the proposed technical changes will support monitoring and compliance activities.

28.    This project also flows from previous direction provided by Council.

29.    Proposed Plan Change 30 is required under Schedule 1 of the RMA to be publicly notified for submission and further submissions.

Next Steps

30.    The finalised proposed plan change and the accompanying section 32 analysis will be publicly notified in accordance with the requirements of Schedule 1 of the RMA.

31.    Following the submission and further submission process, the proposed plan change is required to proceed to a hearing and recommendation process.

32.    After the submissions and further submissions have been received, approval will be sought from Council for the appointment of a Hearings Panel or an Independent Hearings Commissioner to hear and make recommendations on the plan change to Council.  This will consider the role of elected members being part of a Hearings Panel.

33.    The decision to adopt those recommendations will rest with Council following the hearing of submissions and receipt of the Hearing Panel or Independent Hearings Commissioner(s) recommendation report.

34.    It is anticipated that decisions on the plan change will occur in the 2021 calendar year following recommendations being made to Council by a Hearings Panel or an Independent Commissioner.

Attachments

1.      Annotated Text Plan Change 30 Earthworks - A11850330

2.      Section 32 Report - Plan Change 30 - Earthworks - A11850320   


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 


 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

9.4         Te Papa Spatial Plan

File Number:           A11832694

Author:                    Carl Lucca, Programme Director: Urban Communities

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      To seek approval of the Te Papa Spatial Plan and associated 30-year Implementation Plan from the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee.

Recommendations

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee:

(a)     Approves the Te Papa Spatial Plan.

(b)     Agrees in principle to the Te Papa peninsula 30-year Implementation Plan to support the recommended urban form, movement and broader spatial plan outcomes, subject to further investigation and funding availability.

(c)     Notes that investment timing, costs and cost sharing are subject to Long Term Plan funding prioritisation and further investigations and agreement between the project partners which will come before Council for approvals as the Te Papa programme progresses.

 

Executive Summary

2.      Developed over the course of 18 months with ongoing input from local and central government project partners, mana whenua, stakeholders and the community, the Te Papa project is made up of two core deliverables – the Te Papa Spatial Plan, and the Te Papa Indictive Business Case (IBC).

3.      While the adopted IBC focuses on an integrated land use transport strategy, it is supported by the broader Spatial Plan, which provides for consideration of supporting infrastructure and community investment, including community amenities, opens space, environmental, cultural and wider considerations. This report focuses on the Te Papa Spatial Plan, including:

(a)     An overview of the Spatial Plan and key outcomes, including relationship to the IBC

(b)     Strategic and statutory context

(c)     Mana whenua engagement

(d)     Community and stakeholder engagement

(e)     An overview of the Spatial Plan content

(f)      The recommended ‘30-year Implementation Plan’.

4.      The Spatial Plan provides a 30-year blueprint of the strategic direction for growth of the Te Papa peninsula, forming the basis for the co-ordination of decision making across multi agencies in a growth context. Initial stages of the Te Papa project have assisted to inform and refine Plan Change 26 – Housing Choice; however, the project’s primary focus is on the development of a supporting plan for investment in amenities, infrastructure (including transport) and other initiatives required to support and deliver sustainable growth for delivery through future long-term plans and by other organisations.

5.      As part of the Te Papa project process, Council approved the Te Papa IBC on 5 May 2020, including the recommended Te Papa peninsula urban form option and agreed in principle to the Te Papa peninsula 30-year multi-modal transport programme to support the recommended urban form option, subject to further investigation and funding availability. This included a full outline of the indictive transport, 3-waters, open space and social infrastructure programme costs.

6.      The IBC was formally endorsed by Waka Kotahi at their 20 August Board meeting, and the outcomes of that process are built into the Spatial Plan (refer diagram below).

 

Figure 1: Te Papa Project – Indicative Business Case and Spatial Plan Components

overview of the Spatial Plan

7.      The Te Papa Spatial Plan has been prepared by Tauranga City Council (TCC) in partnership with mana whenua and working in collaboration with key stakeholders. A key part of the process has also included community and wider stakeholder engagement.

8.      The Spatial Plan supports an integrated land use transport strategy that will increase opportunity for higher density living in close proximity to centres, public transport and other amenities along the Te Papa peninsula, supported by a sustained, balanced investment programme in active modes and public transport infrastructure. It sets out how we support the growth of unique, liveable, connected and healthy communities within Te Papa. It provides a framework for working together to unlock opportunities in a way that will accommodate growth and change over time.

9.      The Spatial Plan priorities are to initially focus on higher density development and supporting investment in and around key centres and corridors, acknowledging the benefits that this approach will provide for the wider community and the alignment with the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD). This will enable people to choose from more housing types and encourage more people to walk, cycle and take public transport to get to where they need to go. The Te Papa Spatial Plan Centres Map identifies the location of the Te Papa key centres and the programme to develop these centres over time.

10.    The focus of residential growth will be on providing higher densities in proximity to centres and public transport. This includes up to six storey heights close to the city centre, town centres and planned rapid transit bus stops; and four storey heights within walking distance to other centres and amenities. Housing types will include duplexes, terrace housing and apartments, providing for individuals through to extended families. There will be less change to housing density towards the outer edges of the peninsula.

11.    The scale of growth required in Te Papa and the wider city means significant further investment is needed. As well as the movement infrastructure provided for through the IBC programme, the Spatial Plan provides for improvements to local amenities and infrastructure needed to support our communities.

12.    The Spatial Plan Implementation Plan sets out a full programme of investment to be delivered by the programme partners. Investments are across urban development, centres improvements, provision of green networks, community facilities, walking, cycling, micro-mobility, public transport, waters, cultural investment, social infrastructure improvements.

13.    The Spatial Plan and associated implementation actions will result in holistic benefits for the city and community, including:

(a)     Better and more equitable access to social and economic opportunities

(b)     Housing that better meets our needs

(c)     More opportunities for meaningful employment and economic growth in Te Papa

(d)     Neighbourhoods that are more liveable and have a stronger sense of culture and identity

(e)     Improvements in environmental quality.

14.    Through the IBC process, the multi-modal transport benefits and wider economic benefits (WEBs) have been apportioned to the transport investment, resulting in an overall Benefit Cost Ratio (BCR) estimated to be between 2.3 and 3.7.

15.    Having regard to the above benefits, the Spatial Plan is well aligned with central government policy, as well as local strategic direction for growth, including the recently endorsed Urban Form and Transport Initiative. This should also assist in leveraging government investment in other parts of our city such as in Tauriko.

16.    Moving forward, the Te Papa Spatial Plan will assist to provide the basis for:

(a)     Supporting Plan Change 26 – Housing Choice to give effect to the NPS-UD, particularly as it relates to enabling increased densities and heights within Te Papa; and; and

(b)     Providing the basis for the 2021-31 Long Term Plan (LTP) decision making to support growth within Te Papa. 

Strategic / Statutory Context

17.    The Spatial Plan responds to central and local government strategic direction, which sets out expectations for integrated land use and transport and supporting investment, in order to achieve wellbeing and sustainability outcomes.

National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD)

18.    Released in August 2020, the NPS-UD seeks to ensure development of well-functioning, inclusive and better-connected cities that reflect the diversity of their current and future communities. It requires that Tauranga City Council enables higher-density residential development in proximity to employment opportunities (including the city centre and neighbourhood centres) and existing and planned rapid transit bus stops and where commercial activities and services are easily accessible by active or public transport networks.

19.    The Spatial Plan responds to government direction by focusing on development of centres and surrounding areas supported by public transport, active modes and improved amenities.

Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s Arataki

20.    Released in December 2019, Arataki provides national guidance with a 10-year view of the changes needed to deliver on the government’s current priorities and long-term objectives for the land transport system and integrated land use at a regional level. The spatial plan and associated projects incorporate an integrated land use transport strategy to give specific regard to the Arataki key steps changes, including improving urban form, transforming urban mobility, improving public health, tackling climate change and supporting regional development.

21.    The Arataki Strategy links strongly with the NPS-UD, providing direction on steps required to achieve the government’s short-term priorities and longer-term outcomes, including:

(a)     Improve urban form – use transport to improve connections between people, product and places 

(b)     Transform urban mobility – shift from our reliance on single occupancy vehicles to more sustainable transport solutions for the movement of people and freight

22.    The Te Papa Spatial Plan is well aligned with the above direction.

Citywide and Regional Initiatives

23.    At a sub-regional level in the Western Bay of Plenty, the Urban Form and Transport Initiative programme business case (UFTI) identifies Te Papa as a critical area to provide for residential and commercial growth and improved local and sub-regional transport networks. Intensification within the Te Papa area is a core outcome sought within the UFTI programme. Delivery of multimodal options, public transport prioritisation starting with the CBD to Tauriko strategic journey along Cameron Road, along with the lead community infrastructure to support Te Papa intensification is expected to take place in the first decade and stage 1 Cameron Road multi-modal improvements from the CBD to Tauranga Hospital have secured $45m of Crown grant funding as a ‘spade ready’ project.

24.    Intensification has been a core pillar of the SmartGrowth since the first SmartGrowth Strategy in 2007.  The proposed SmartGrowth Future Development Strategy (FDS) the TCC draft Tauranga Urban Strategy (TUS) also place focus on planning for growth in our existing urban areas. Both strategies emphasise placemaking in and around our town centres (including local shopping centres) to support more compact forms of housing, identifying Te Papa as a key area for initial focus. 

25.    The Spatial Plan also recognises Te Papa as a part of the wider Tauranga and the Western Bay of Plenty urban system. Te Papa provides opportunities for more housing choice, which in turn can help with wider city affordability. UFTI proposes that the Western Corridor provides a substantial proportion of the greenfield growth capacity for the long term. Improvements to movement within Te Papa will also support growth of the Western Corridor of Tauranga which includes Tauriko West. Tauriko West has the potential to deliver over 3,000 new dwellings and multi-modal transport upgrades within Te Papa will play a key role in delivering and enabling better transport choice for wider growth areas through its key transport corridors.

26.    In addition, the government is investing close to $1billion in the Tauranga Northern Link and 4-laning to Omokoroa north of Tauranga. This includes managed lanes with priority for buses and high occupancy vehicles. These transport projects will connect to Cameron Road and leverage the public transport improvements along this corridor.

Consistency with Current Council Priorities, including Cameron Road Multimodal Project Stage 1

27.    The Te Papa Spatial Plan also supports Council’s response to Covid-19 crisis. TCC has worked closely with central government to determine potential stimulus packages, including ‘shovel ready’ Crown Infrastructure Partner projects (CIPs).

28.    In August TCC and the Government signed an agreement in relation to grant funding of $45m for the Cameron Road Multimodal Project Stage 1 delivery and design for Stage 2. The Te Papa Spatial Plan and IBC forms part of the evidence base to move this project forward.

29.    Council endorsement of the Te Papa Spatial Plan and notification of Plan Change 26 – Housing Choice will be tangible delivery on the commitments made by Council in the post Covid funding application and agreement.

Mana Whenua partnership

30.    On 24 September 2020, the Te Rangapū Mana Whenua o Tauranga Moana Partnership passed a resolution to endorse mana whenua’s inputs into the Spatial Plan and support its approval at the 13 October UFTD Committee meeting.

31.    Through the preparation of the Te Papa Spatial Plan, Council have worked in partnership with mana whenua, including representatives of Ngāi Tamarāwaho, Ngāti Tapu, Ngāi Te Ahi, Ngāti Ruahine and Ngāti Pūkenga, as well as wider engagement with iwi and hapū through the Te Rangapū Mana Whenua o Tauranga Moana Partnership.

32.    Mana whenua representation formed part of the Te Papa Design Sprint for the project in late 2019. As part of the Te Papa Design Sprint process, mana whenua identified the need for ongoing engagement to lay the foundation for how the partners work together moving forward. A key focus following the Design Sprint has been working in partnership with mana whenua, including through a series of wānanga.

33.    The outcomes of the process include (refer diagram below):

(a)     Principles for engagement on future Te Papa related projects

(b)     Mapping of cultural landscape and values

(c)     Te Papa principles and outcomes, to input and guide future projects (relating to land use, open space, movement, cultural layers)

(d)     Potential cultural related projects.

Figure 2: Te Papa Spatial Plan – Mana Whenua Outcomes and Principles 

Consultation / Engagement

34.    Community and stakeholder engagement have been an integral part of the Spatial Plan preparation throughout the process (refer diagram below), with engagement assisting to provide direction in relation to outcomes sought, including the Implementation Plan. A full overview of engagement outcomes was provided at the 9 June 2020 UFTD Committee meeting along with an update at the 1 September 2020 UFTD committee workshop.

Figure 3: Overview of Te Papa Spatial Plan community engagement process

overview of the Spatial Plan content

35.    The Spatial Plan is made up of the following key sections, each described hereafter in further detail:

(a)     Spatial Plan Overview

(b)     Spatial Plan Outcomes

(c)     Key Centre Plans

(d)     Implementation Plan

Part A: Spatial Plan Overview

36.    This section identifies the background and strategic context to the Spatial Plan, the overall approach to enabling growth in Te Papa, key challenges, priority areas of focus and anticipated benefits. It also includes the mana whenua engagement principles and cultural mapping (the Takiwā and Waahi Map).

Part B: Spatial Plan Outcomes

37.    This section identifies the outcomes that the Spatial Plan seeks to facilitate, and actions required to achieve these; these are focused on supporting the growth of unique, liveable, connected and healthy neighbourhoods within Te Papa. These outcomes will allow us to facilitate growth and deliver a range of benefits that respond to the needs and desires of the local and wider community.

Part C: Key Centre Plans

38.    This section provides guidance to assist with local planning and improvement of key centres identified: city centre, Gate Pā / Pukehinahina (including Tauranga Hospital), Merivale and Greerton. It also provides a starting point to coordinate and integrate the various planning and delivery projects. Work undertaken in centres will be carried out in collaboration with local communities, mana whenua, partners and key stakeholders, and incorporates local aspirations along with the outcomes or core elements identified for each of the centres.

Part D: Te Papa Implementation Plan

39.    The Implementation Plan sets out actions in the form of projects and further planning work required over the next 30-year period to deliver the Spatial Plan outcomes, including projects in the first 10 years that will inform the preparation of the LTP 2021-31.

40.    The Implementation Plan provides guidance on the recommended priority and timing of projects, including those where further planning work is required to determine how they may be delivered. Projects may need to be added in the future to reflect the outcomes of the planning work.

41.    Ultimately, it will take strong partnerships with a range of organisations, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the community to deliver the most effective outcomes. The timing and order to deliver these projects will be considered as part of Council’s LTP process and in partnership with project delivery partners, including central government.

42.    TCC will play a key role in ongoing implementation. This role may take many forms from direct investment in public works to partnering or advocating for positive changes to encourage investment, such as with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, Bay of Plenty Regional Council, central government agencies and other stakeholders.

43.    Through ongoing review and engagement, Council will continue to prioritise initiatives to align with the outcomes outlined within this document and encourage investment within Te Papa. Key prioritisation criteria for initiatives will include:

(a)     Achieving the outcomes as outlined within this plan

(b)     Strategic fit with the growth approach of this plan and Council’s wider strategies, including sub-regional strategies like UFTI

(c)     The ability to attract and increase public and private investment

(d)     Contribution to mana whenua outcomes sought within this plan

(e)     Value for money, including synergies with Council infrastructure renewals and upgrades.

44.    Projects may have a range of either committed or potential funders available. For example, Waka Kotahi is a key funding partner for many of the transport projects in accordance with the IBC.

45.    The LTP is Council’s main budgetary tool. Some of the projects are already budgeted for in the LTP but many are not. It is important to note that the availability of funding from Council for proposed projects is not guaranteed. Funding and prioritisation will be determined as part of the LTP and Annual Plan processes; in this regard, the funding opportunities for several of the projects identified in the Spatial Plan will need to be carefully considered.

46.    The following sections provide a further detailed overview of the Implementation Plan and associated LTP cost estimates for the coming 10-year period. Refer to section D of the spatial plan for full detail on the proposed projects.

Land Use

47.    Growth and change will be incremental, evidence suggesting that residential change in intensification areas generally occurs at a rate of about 10% every 10 years[1]. Recent commercial development feasibility testing undertaken to support the Te Papa and Housing Choice Plan Change projects acknowledges existing constraints (e.g. existing land values, development costs) in the market that will need to be responded to, to speed up development opportunities. However, we also know that there is significant demand by Tauranga’s largest developers and other key stakeholders (e.g., Accessible Properties and Kāinga Ora) to enable development in these areas now. Input from development economic experts has also emphasised the need for supporting investment (i.e. movement and community infrastructure) as a significant factor in changing the value proposition for investment in areas such as Te Papa.  

48.    Within those areas where opportunity for higher densities is enabled through Plan Change 26, the speed of development will also be impacted by supporting investment in infrastructure, community amenities and catalyst projects (including residential development), and factors such as the ebb and flow of economic wellbeing and migration, impacted by national and global trends. Similarly, the speed of supporting infrastructure delivery will also be tied to key development milestones (as below).

49.    In this regard, the timing of the urban form and multi-modal transport programme delivery remains subject to funding availability (at a local and national level) and the uptake of residential development (by both the private and public sectors). While the indicative timing proposed may change due to these factors, the general order of investment should relatively remain constant. Indicative timeframes for those areas where development investment can be made to catalyse change are recommended as follows:

(a)     Immediate focus on on-going city centre regeneration

(b)     Gate Pā / Pukehinahina: 0-15year focus on residential / community regeneration; reliant on central government and key stakeholder collaboration, with planning to occur prior

(c)     Merivale: 5-15year focus on residential / community regeneration; reliant on central government and key stakeholder collaboration, with planning to occur prior

(d)     Greerton: 20+ year focus on existing town centre and potential Crown owned lands (open space, green space, living and other uses; subject to ongoing engagement with existing users, community, stakeholders and mana whenua).

50.    The above outcomes will be supported by ongoing planning (e.g. regeneration plans) and investment in transport, social and other support infrastructure, as outlined below

Transport

51.    The centres-based approach puts more residential development within a short distance of employment, social, educational and other opportunities. A focus on movement by active modes and micro-mobility leverages off the opportunity that this provides.

52.    However, a large number of trips within the Te Papa peninsula involve people travelling in from other areas of the city and subregion. By providing key public transport spines this enables some of those longer trips to be undertaken efficiently via public transport, whilst also enabling trips within the peninsula to be undertaken by public transport for those whom active and micro modes may be less appropriate or appealing (noting an ageing population within the subregion).

53.    This approach also recognises that a public transport network cannot be effective unless good active transport (particularly walking) connections are provided for people to be able to access it. Similarly provisioning for public transport must consider the safety of active and micro modes given the likely severity of crashes involving buses and more vulnerable road users.

54.    Having regard to the above, key components of the transport interventions include:

(a)     Walking, cycling and micro-mobility improvements, including greenways and street improvements (including town centre amenity improvements)

(b)     Public transport improvements, including Cameron Road Multimodal Project Stages 1 and 2 and proposed transport hubs City Centre, Hospital and Greerton

(c)     Ongoing Travel Demand Management (TDM) programme rollout

55.    Full details of the transport programme are contained within the IBC. The cost estimations for the 10-year transport capital components are $237m (excluding applicable Waka Kotahi funding contributions); the cost estimations for the 10-year transport opex components are $21m.

3-Waters

56.    Key components of the 3-waters interventions include water supply upgrades, wastewater upgrades and stormwater alleviation (providing provide stormwater mitigation and address overland flow paths in key development areas; noting further investigations will be required).

57.    The cost estimations for the 10-year open space capital components are $95m to provide for near future upgrades (water and wastewater) and priority development areas (e.g. stormwater within the Gate Pā area), noting that a proportion can be attributed to renewals and wider capacity needs.

58.    It is noted that further investigations are required as part of Council’s ongoing 3-waters programme; as part of this process there will need to be prioritisation of stormwater solutions based on further technical analysis of catchments.

Cultural Interventions

59.    The combination of engagement and the cultural principles outlined within the spatial plan seek to assist in restoring the mana rangatiratanga of Te Papa, through protecting, enhancing, commemorating and celebrating those areas of significance to mana whenua. In doing so, they also aim to enrich the culture and identity for the wider community and future generations to come. Key components of the cultural interventions include educational programmes and cultural recognition projects including artworks, place naming and contributions to wider projects.

60.    The cost estimations for the 10-year cultural interventions capital components are $3.3m.

Open space overview

61.    Council’s level of service for open space is based on four key standards; quantity (the amount of open space), quality (how open spaces are developed, used and maintained) , accessibility (how far people have to travel to get to open space) and function (the variety of experiences provided). 

62.    From a quantity, function and accessibility point of view, there is a relatively good provision of reserves and diversity of spaces in Te Papa, particularly in terms of a 500m walking distance to local reserves.  A key challenge is that a lack of good quality public realm and built form, combined with a need to enhance local culture and identity, is not attracting more people to live, work and play in the Te Papa peninsula. This provides an opportunity to improve the quality of what is currently available (e.g. Scout Reserve, Anzac Park, Kopurererua Valley connections), maximise the function of existing Council owned reserve land, and provide additional open space in areas of higher density (e.g. around centres). 

63.    There are areas of open space that function as green corridors, but which are quite discrete and don’t connect well along or across the peninsula. They are mainly located within Kopurererua Valley and along esplanade reserves.  All of these unconnected areas will benefit from comprehensive green corridor network plan, incorporating all reserve types (neighbourhood, stormwater, roads and streets, esplanade, and other open space areas both publicly and privately owned). Green corridors can serve multiple functions including movement, ecology, amenity and connecting neighbourhoods.

64.    Having regard to the above, key components of the open space interventions include LoS upgrades for open space, greenway improvements, improving safety and accessibility through implementation of CPTED principles and other improvements to support increased population.

65.    The cost estimations for the 10-year open space capital components are $33m.

Community facilities overview

66.    There are many ageing facilities that are no longer fit for purpose and that have had minimal investment over time located within Te Papa.  Some are also under pressure in terms of capacity which provides limited opportunity to service further growth. There is a lack of multi-use spaces which limits the flexibility of use and ability to cater to diverse community needs.  Also, larger community facilities which service a greater population catchment are mainly located outside of Te Papa in the eastern corridor and therefore harder to get to for the Te Papa current and future community. 

67.    A community facility needs assessment (completed by Visitor Solutions 2019) identifies the requirement for investment in the current community facility network and the development of new community facilities to meet community needs now and into the future. Growth is a key contributor to the rationale used to justify this investment with long term increases of more than three to fourfold.  With the exception of Greerton Library (subject to a Western Corridor library development), all community centres, swimming pools, libraries and indoor sports facilities in Te Papa require some form of further investigation or investment in the future.  Specific actions required for community facilities in Te Papa include to investigate the development of Memorial Pool to provide local aquatic functions along with dedicated leisure and potentially deep-water sport functions, and to explore development of a new integrated community centre within the city centre as a potential outcome of existing facility rationalisation. 

68.    There are several community proposals for specific hubs or community support centres for certain sectors of the community and/or for locations such as Gate Pā.  Each proposal requires a robust feasibility study to support the need for development of new facilities, including identifying opportunities for utilising existing facilities, co-location with other facilities, and multi-use opportunities with other organisations. 

69.    Having regard to the above, key components of the community facility interventions include Memorial Park Aquatic Centre and the Central Library, along with a number of ongoing feasibilities studies for other amenities.

70.    The cost estimations for the 10-year open space capital components are $119m.

Centres Improvements

71.    As part of ongoing city centre revitalisation and regeneration of Gate Pā, Merivale and Greerton, there will be need for a range of centres-based project to attract business investment, residential development, residents and visitors to the area. This will be particularly relevant within regeneration areas when working alongside other project partners.

72.    Centres improvements will include streetscape, open space and public realm projects, ranging in size and cost. Where possible, these will be integrated as part of other projects and with co-funding from partners.

73.    A bulk fund allocation is proposed for Te Papa to provide for centres improvements. Projects are identified through the Te Papa Spatial Plan and further definition will be provided through more detailed planning as part of the city centre revitalisation and regeneration of Gate Pā, Merivale and Greerton. These will come before Council as part of those processes for consideration and approval. The cost estimations for the 10-year centres improvements capital components are $49m.

Summary of Costs

74.    Based on the above, the estimated capital costs for the 3-year and 10-year period for consideration in the LTP 21-31 are summarised as follows:

Category

3-year cost estimates $m

10-year cost estimates $m

Transport

67.3

237

3-Waters

28.5

95

Cultural Interventions

2.0

3.3

Open space

9.4

33

Community facilities

72

119

Centres upgrades to support growth

8

49

Total

$187.2

$536.3m

 

75.    Based on the above, the estimated operational costs for the 3-year and 10-year period are summarised as follows:

Category

3-year cost estimates

10-year cost estimates

Transport

$4m

$21m

 

76.    In preparing the IBC, transport projects were identified, including estimated opex costs. At the time of writing, for 3-waters, cultural interventions, open space and community facilities, detailed opex costings have been undertaken for some but not all these projects. Further detail on opex costs will be estimated and brought before Council as part of the LTP process.

Options Analysis

77.    Option 1: Approve the Te Papa Spatial Plan, including the Implementation Plan, as per the attachment to this report. Approving the Spatial Plan will support the recommended urban form, movement and broader spatial plan outcomes, and is in alignment with the direction of the NPS-UD. This will result in holistic benefits for the city and community, including:

(a)     Better and more equitable access to social and economic opportunities

(b)     Housing that meets our needs

(c)     More opportunities for meaningful employment and economic growth in Te Papa

(d)     Neighbourhoods that are more liveable and have a stronger sense of culture and identity

(e)     Improvements in environmental quality.

78.    Option 2: Choose not to approve Te Papa Spatial Plan, including the Implementation Plan. Not proceeding with the Te Papa Spatial Plan programme has potential to compromise achieving the above benefits for the city and community, as well as potentially exacerbating existing challenges such as lack of housing supply, housing affordability, transport challenges, transport funding and low-quality living amenity in some areas. 

79.    A full analysis of the above options has been undertaken as part of the Te Papa project process, with Option 1 recommended as the preferred way forward.

Financial Considerations

80.    As noted above and taking into account wider investment that will be required in infrastructure and community amenities, the indicative benefit cost ratio (BCR) associated with the recommended urban form and multi-modal transport programme is estimated to be between 2.3 and 3.7.

81.    The timing and order to deliver these projects will be considered as part of Council’s LTP process and in partnership with project delivery partners, including central government.  Consideration will also be given to funding options for TCC’s share of capital costs as part of the LTP including the use of development contributions.

Legal Implications / Risks

82.    Risks of not acting includes inconsistency with central government direction, including emerging direction on growth as identified within the draft NPS-UD.

83.    Furthermore, there are risks around the relationship with the Crown and receipt of Crown funding if Council does not progress with the agreed strategic direction.

Significance

84.    Having regard to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, significance of this project is considered ‘high’. It affects a wide range of people; has moderate to high public interest; and will have a large consequence for the city in terms of growth over time. As outlined within this report, community, stakeholder and mana whenua engagement is ongoing, including opportunity to provide feedback in relation to aspects of the urban form and transport recommendations developed as part of the Spatial Plan. Further opportunities for engagement will also be provided through the Long-Term Plan process and project delivery stages as outlined in the diagram below.

Next Steps

85.    Subject to Council’s endorsement of the Spatial Plan, the next steps in this process (during the 2020 – 2024 period) are:

(a)     Implementing city plan changes to enable growth within Te Papa, specifically Plan Change 26 – Housing Choice

(b)     Prioritisation of projects through the LTP process

(c)     Ongoing discussions and planning with key project partners, government agencies and stakeholders (e.g. Kāinga Ora, Accessible Properties Limited) in relation to housing regeneration within the peninsula, particularly around Gate Pā/Pukehinahina and Merivale.

(d)     Working with other agencies and partners to facilitate exemplar projects that demonstrate the design principles and their desired social and environmental outcomes. 

(e)     Completion of the System Operating Framework (as part of Tauranga System Plan) for Tauranga, assisting to inform the next series of transport planning for the city and Te Papa.

(f)      Planning for and delivery of key transport infrastructure to link with wider city (particularly Tauriko) through Cameron Road Multimodal Project Stage 1 (including implementation), city centre interventions and Cameron Road Multimodal Project Stage 2 (planning).

(g)     Supporting ongoing open space and cultural planning and investment.

(h)     Continued transport demand management and public transport real-time infrastructure improvements.

Attachments

1.      Te Papa Spatial Plan - A11875656  l

 

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

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Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

9.5         Transport & Water Strategy and Planning Projects Progress Report - October 2020

File Number:           A11866955

Author:                    Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

Authoriser:              Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.      The purpose of this report is to provide the Committee with an update on the current progress, next steps and any identified risks with the current Transport & Waters Strategy and Planning projects.

Recommendations

That the Urban Form and Transport Development Committee receives the Transport & Water Strategy and Planning Progress Report – October 2020.

 

Executive Summary

2.      Tauranga continues to experience rapid urban development pressure and growth which creates demand for transport and waters infrastructure.  This growth may slow in the short-term as the result of Covid-19 but has not to date, and growth is expected to remain strong in the medium to long-term.

3.      The attached report outlines the progress being made in relation to projects necessary to provide for this continued growth.  This information is also regularly reported to the SmartGrowth partners and the SmartGrowth Forums.

4.      Of specific note are:

(a)     Endorsement of the UFTI and Te Papa transport business cases by the NZTA Board.

(b)     Completion of the Transport System Operating Framework (TSOF) component of the Transport System Plan project

(c)     Limited progress on the Early Works and Long Term business cases for Tauriko, noting potential implications for the timing of the plan change to rezone Tauriko West for development

(d)     Continued engagement with NZTA on matters associated with the TNL such as interchange design, resolution of remaining safety issues and access to Smiths Farm

(e)     National Policy Statement (NPS) and National Environmental Standard (NES) for Freshwater. The new NPS and NES for Freshwater have been gazetted in August. They introduce a very strong focus on the protection and enhancement of wetlands and streams. They also introduced new responsibilities for territorial authorities in integrated management of land use and freshwater outcomes.  A separate presentation item is included on the agenda to cover this matter.

(f)      Focus is currently on the LTP and RLTP processes.

5.      The following projects have been included in the Progress Report for a final time.  These projects have either progressed such that going forward they are more appropriately reported to another Committee or they are completed.  These projects are identified in the attached tables in apricot shading, and the reason for the change is noted below in brackets.

(a)     Eastern corridor wastewater study (planning study completed and endorsed by UFTD 9 June 2020)

(b)     Western corridor wastewater study (planning study completed and endorsed by UFTD 5 May 2020)

(c)     City Intensification (Te Papa) water and wastewater studies (planning studies complete, and outcomes incorporated into Te Papa IBC and Spatial Plan)

(d)     UFTI (project complete and endorsed by all project partners July 2020)

(e)     Cameron Road multi-modal project Stage 1 (future reporting via PSOC as it is has moved into detailed planning/design and delivery led by Infrastructure Group).

(f)      Cycle Plan (future reporting via PSOC as budget approved and into detailed planning/design and delivery led by Infrastructure Group).

Strategic / Statutory Context

6.      The growth-related waters and transportation projects are framed under the strategic direction of SmartGrowth and UFTI, the draft Future Development Strategy, the 30-year Infrastructure Strategies and Long-Term Plan.

Options Analysis

7.      There are no options, this report is for information only.

Significance

8.      While growth is a significant issue for Tauranga City, this report does not require any decisions and is not significant in itself.

Next Steps

9.      Council continue to progress the projects and works identified in this update report.

Attachments

1.      Appendix A - Quarterly Update - Transport Projects - October 2020 - A11687311

2.      Appendix B - Quarterly Update - Waters Strategy Planning Projects - October 2020 - A11687319   


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

 

Project Description

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

Planning Projects

Urban Form and Transport Initiative (UFTI)

UFTI provides a programme business case that sets out an optimal land use and transport programme and delivery plan known as ‘Connected Centres’ for the western Bay of Plenty sub-region over the next 50 years and beyond.

 

·      UFTI was endorsed by Tauranga City Council and the SmartGrowth partner Councils at the combined SmartGrowth Leadership Group meeting on 1 July 2020.

·      In August both Cabinet and Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency also endorsed UFTI.

·      Cabinets endorsement of UFTI includes the Crown’s agreement to become a formal member of the SmartGrowth partnership. This includes Crown representation at the SmartGrowth Leadership Group.

·      Waka Kotahi’s endorsement of UFTI identifies that:

o Activities in accordance with UFTI are considered by Waka Kotahi for inclusion in Arataki, the Waka Kotahi Investment Proposal and the NLTP

o Endorsement of UFTI is not a funding agreement for the activities within the business case. Activities still need to go through the normal processes to secure funding.

·      Waka Kotahi’s endorsement of UFTI is conditional on the SmartGrowth partners developing, agreeing, and signing a comprehensive benefits realisation, monitoring and reporting framework for UFTI outcomes, KPIs, and programme delivery, with the SmartGrowth Leadership Group as the accountable entity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

·      Key next steps include:

o The continued development of the western Bay of Plenty Transport System Plan (reported on below).

o UFTI’s inclusion in the SmartGrowth partnership’s Joint Spatial Plan. This will replace the existing 2013 SmartGrowth Strategy. In so doing it will provide one cohesive strategic document for the western Bay of Plenty that incorporates and reflects all key projects planned for the sub-region over the next 10 years.

 

 

 

 

Western Bay of Plenty Transport System Plan (TSP)

The purpose of the TSP is to identify the preferred strategic form of the City’s key transport network to deliver appropriate levels of service for all transport modes. As part of this, there will be a specific focus on long-term options and solutions for key pinch points in the network such as the Hewletts Road area.

·      The TSP project was endorsed by Tauranga City Council in September 2019.

·      The project partners include Waka Kotahi, Bay of Plenty Regional Council, Western Bay of Plenty District Council, Port of Tauranga, KiwiRail, Priority One and Tangata Whenua.

·      The development of the System Operating Framework (SOF) is complete. This has involved a collaborative evidence-based process to identify mode priorities and conflicts, level of service gaps and option/activity identification and testing to respond to these.

·      Engagement with Elected Members for each Council project partner has been undertaken. Initial engagement with a key stakeholder group has also occurred. An initial meeting with Tangata Whenua (Te Rangapu Mana Whenua o Tauranga Moana) has also occurred and further engagement is required. 

 

Next steps for the project include:

·      October: Further engagement with Elected Members for each partner Council is programmed. This is to seek joint-agreement by the Council partners to the TSPs prioritised list of activities for inclusion in Long Term Plans, the Regional Land Transport Plan and the National Land Transport Programme.

·      Further development of the TSP Implementation Plan including more detailed scoping of the prioritised activities (e.g. priority business cases; implementation activities) and the funding and resourcing to support this.

Regional Mode Shift Plan

The Bay of Plenty Mode Shift Plan Regional Framework (MSP) provides an overview of the region’s challenges and direction with regards to mode shift and brings together in one document the partners’ existing key policies, strategies and plans relating to mode-shift. 

 

·      At the September 2020 UFTD meeting the Committee endorsed the draft Bay of Plenty Mode Shift Plan Regional Framework and the Western Bay of Plenty section. Further, the Committee noted that the Rotorua and Eastern Bay of Plenty sub-regional sections of the Mode Shift Plan are still to be developed.

·      Bay of Plenty Regional Council will work with Waka Kotahi NZTA and local councils to develop the Rotorua Lakes and Eastern Bay of Plenty sub-regional sections in the MSP by December 2020 and early 2021 respectively.

·      Staff will continue to work with Waka Kotahi and Bay of Plenty Regional Council to continue implementing the projects outlined in the MSP.

·      It is anticipated that the MSP will be a live document. When updates are required, staff will work with Waka Kotahi and will report back to Council. For example, projects related to mode-shift that will be identified through the Western Bay’s Transport System Plan (TSP) could be added in a next revision of the MSP.

 

Inter-regional rapid rail investigation 

·      In August 2020 the Government announced that it will undertake an Indicative Business Case (IBC) to investigate the potential for rapid rail between Hamilton and Auckland. While the project is in an early scoping stage of development its understood that the Government intends to investigate four possible options ranging from extending electrification of the existing route to building a new rail alignment alongside the existing corridor.

·      In its decision the Government also included a mandate to initiate an investigation of a separate IBC for extending rapid rail to Tauranga, and how that would fit with the Hamilton to Auckland IBC.

·      The Ministry of Transport (MoT) is leading this work and has signalled its keenness for relevant local and regional government like Tauranga and Hamilton City Councils and Waikato and Bay of Plenty Regional Councils to have a role in the project.

·      The project is currently at an early scoping stage. The MoT have offered to provide a briefing on the project post the election. This could include more detail on the role that local and regional government could take in the development of the IBCs. In the interim, advice has been provided to the MoT on the existing key strategic plans (e.g. SmartGrowth Strategy; Urban Form & Transport Initiative; FutureProof Strategy; the developing Hamilton Metro Spatial Plan) that they should be aware of as the project is scoped.

 

IDC (Infrastructure Development Code) Transport Provisions

Updating the transport provisions within the IDC to ensure future street designs can facilitate medium density developments and achieve improved street design for all people using streets.

·      The Tauranga Street design guide was endorsed by the City Transformation Committee in December 2018.

·      Development of the digital component of the Street design tool that will support the delivery of the Street design guide is now complete. This is a digital tool with to help inform the required elements in a street. Additional testing by utilities and a test group of consultants is underway.

·      Design diagrams that provide more detail of design elements in the street environment are also being developed and tested with stakeholders.

 

Next steps include:

·      Continued testing of the tool.

·      Identify updates required to the IDC to support the use of the tool and other project deliverables.

·      Inform wider development community of upcoming changes and provide an opportunity for further feedback (currently programmed for November).

·      Report to UFTD (currently programmed for February 2021) on all the deliverables of this project.

Tauranga City Parking Policy

·      Investigations into the key parking issues and opportunities facing Tauranga has been undertaken. These investigations were discussed with Elected Members at a Workshop held in September 2019.

·      Following that workshop the investigations were referred to UFTI to support its development. In respect to car parking UFTI identifies that:

o With the increase in multimodal use and improved access to the urban centres, the need to provide the same quantum of carparking could reduce.

o Parking costs should be targeted to help encourage people to use the personal mobility or public transport options available to them.

o For the commercial areas throughout the sub-region, an appropriate level of turnover is the focus of parking management policy and activities.

·      UFTI also identifies ‘Actions’ relevant to car parking like completing District Plan Changes to support City intensification and car parking policy to support increased parking turnover (e.g. Te Papa peninsula in 2021).

·      In addition, the now finalised National Policy Statement on Urban Development encourages Councils to implement parking management strategies and removes the ability to apply minimum parking requirements in District Plans. 

·      The TSP is also providing guidance n Parking Policy.

 

 

Next steps include:

·      A workshop with Councillors to seek feedback on the proposed direction and options for a Parking Policy (programmed for early October 2020). 

·      Developing a draft Parking Policy for endorsement by the UFTD Committee before further engagement with the community on the draft Policy; 

·      Then following adoption of a Parking Policy by the UFTD Committee, the development of ‘placed-based’ Parking Implementation Plans for priority areas (e.g. City centre). Its noted that this work could be developed as part of other wider planning projects (like the City Centre planning project).

·      Implementing the NPS-UD direction on car parking through the City Plan later this calendar year (e.g. removal of minimum parking standards).

 

Tauranga Transport Model

The focus on model build/improvement programme continues, this has included:

·      Preparing the technical requirements for TTSM census recalibration.

·      Developing the TTSM and TTHM User Guide, Usage Agreement, and updating the Model partner Heads of Agreement (ongoing).

·      Developing an improved freight model and port forecasting model (ongoing), based on the latest regional freight data collected for UFTI.

·      Identifying potential next steps for a potential Land use and Transport Integration model (e.g. should we build a LUTI model or should we improve the current scenario management procedures?).

·      Processing Household Travel survey data.

·      Through the TSP project developing a new Accessibility model.

·      Nearing completion of Stage 1 of the Tour-based model build.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key next steps include:

·      TTSM recalibration procurement and commencing the required data collection.

·      Update the TTSM and TTHM models to reflect Long Term Plan outcomes.

·      Prepare and update regional models to support Stage 2 of TSP project (i.e. priority business cases).

 

 

Eastern Corridor Transport Planning (Te Tumu & Wairakei)

·      A number of transport focussed workstreams remain underway related to the Te Tumu structure planning process and the Papamoa Eastern Interchange (PEI), these include:

·      Continued development of the detailed design for the PEI to provide access onto the Tauranga Eastern Link.   

·      The PEI and infrastructure to the Te Tumu boundary is approved for financing through the Housing Infrastructure Fund (HIF). Waka Kotahi funding is also financed through the HIF.

·      The PEI is critical to drive development of the Sands Town Centre and the developer has requested that Council investigate options for delivering it independent of Te Tumu.

·      Negotiations are underway with Waka Kotahi to co-fund the design of the PEI and infrastructure to the Te Tumu boundary from the National Land Transport Fund.

·      An application for co-funding for a Business Case for the Te Tumu Structure Plan transport related infrastructure has been submitted to Waka Kotahi.

·      Te Tumu structure planning is ongoing. Transport modelling is largely complete at the development concept level and is now progressed into the detail of intersection and corridor design. The structure plan includes a dedicated public transport lane, high-quality walking and cycling connections, and general traffic lanes. 

·      Detailed transport modelling and cross-section concept design for the Te Tumu structure plan area continues to be workshopped with the landowners / developers.

Next steps include:

·      Progress with a Single-Stage business case for the Te Tumu structure plan transport network once Waka Kotahi has agreed the ‘Point of Entry’. Response is likely in October 2020.

·      Progress with Pre-implementation memorandum for the PEI (alongside the detailed design) once Waka Kotahi has agreed the ‘Point of Entry’. The HIF process represents the business case.

·      Complete detailed design of PEI and Te Okuroa Drive.

·      Continue to progress the cost share discussions between Te Tumu developers and Wairakei town centre developers for transport infrastructure within the town centre area.  

·      Continue to develop the Te Tumu corridor cross-sections with landowners / developers.

 

 

 

Project

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

State Highways Projects

BayLink update  

 

·      The BayLink project is led by Waka Kotahi and involves the upgrade of SH2 between Baypark, the Truman Lane roundabout and Bayfair/Girven Road intersection.

·      Due the decision to include a pedestrian and cycling underpass in the project, additional engineering design works have been required. The design solution has now been developed with works to facilitate the new underpass beginning in late October/early November 2020.

·      Waka Kotahi previously advised that investigations of the role of the State Highway 2/Maunganui Road in providing for public transport priority is required to support an investigation into how public transport priority may need to be delivered through the BayLink project area.

·      The TSP project has investigated this matter and identified the grade separated lanes of State Highway 2/Maunganui Road through BayLink as the ‘primary’ public transport route for Express bus services (e.g. Papamoa – City). For connector type services, the TSP has identified the ‘primary’ PT route as being through the local road network (e.g. Grenada-Farm-Links-Golf-Hewletts).

 

 

 

 

 

 

·      Design and construction works for BayLink are ongoing. There is the opportunity to engage further with Waka Kotahi on the detailed design of the at-grade Girven Rd / SH2-Maunagnui Road intersection to identify any public transport priority for buses which may take this route. Any prioritisation that may be able to be provided would be relatively minor in nature (e.g. signal pre-emption rather than dedicated lane).

 

State Highway 2 North (Waihi To Tauranga including the Takitimu North Link

·      In January 2020 the Government announced the New Zealand Upgrade Programme (NZUP) (https://www.nzta.govt.nz/planning-and-investment/nz-upgrade/overview/)

·      For the BoP, the $993m investment package includes the TNL ($478m) and the SH2 Te Puna to Omokoroa ($455m) projects. Relevant links: 

https://www.nzta.govt.nz/planning-and-investment/nz-upgrade/waikato-and-bay-of-plenty-package/tauranga-northern-link/

https://www.nzta.govt.nz/planning-and-investment/nz-upgrade/waikato-and-bay-of-plenty-package/te-puna-to-omokoroa/

 

·      Waka Kotahi’s procurement process to appoint suppliers for TNL continues with the aim to complete this by March 2021.

·      TCC has continued to engage with Waka Kotahi on specific design elements of SH2 TNL and its integration with and wider impact on the western BoP transport system.

 

·      TCC continues to work with Waka Kotahi on a range of issues associated with design, network capacity, the continuity of managed lanes and safety for the section between 15th Ave and the TNL/Takitimu Dr interchange.

·      NZTA are still to confirm their process for considering matters like the potential tolling of TNL and the revocation of the existing State Highway 2 through Bethlehem and Te Puna that is bypassed by the project.

·      NZTA and TCC are developing a MOU in relation to the Smiths Farm access road that is proposed to be delivered through the TNL project.  It was intended to bring this MOU to this UFTD meeting, but it will instead come to a future meeting for consideration.

 

Western Corridor (SH29 Tauriko / Tauriko West)

In 2018 the development of a Detailed Business Case (known as the ‘Early Works’ package) to identify the transport activities to open-up the initial stages of the Tauriko West started. This project was established to progress investigations as a result of the ‘Long-term business case’ being placed on hold by the Waka Kotahi.

In late 2019 the NZTA announced that it would re-started the Long-Term Detailed Business Case to identify improvements to SH29 and other improvements (local road; public transport; walking & cycling) to enable growth in the wider Western Corridor. 

Both business case continue to be developed in an aligned manner.

 

Tauriko Long-Term Detailed Business Case

·      Waka Kotahi has developed a project programme and defined the next steps for this project. This has involved re-establishing the Project governance structures which include TCC representatives, re-confirming and refining the Project’s investment objectives, and assessing the ‘long-list’ options for responding to the issues facing the SH29 corridor.

·      Discussions are ongoing with Waka Kotahi on scope issues associated with the business case to ensure a comprehensive approach is taken to transport planning in the area.  This includes components of the State Highway network as well as future stages of the proposed western corridor ring road. These discussions are ongoing. 

Tauriko Early Works Detailed Business Case

·      Preferred improvement options are in the process of being confirmed to support further community engagement.

·      Key elements of the Early Works improvement package include:

o SH29 / Cambridge Rd / Whiore Avenue intersection.

o A new access to Tauriko West from SH29 near the existing service station on the western side of the highway in Tauriko Village.

o A southern roundabout connection to the Tauriko Business Estate and Tauriko West

o The western corridor ring road Stage 1 (linking SH29 through the Tauriko Business Estate to SH36) – corridor identification and protection.

o Walking / cycle paths and bus infrastructure

·      To enable an Early Works package to progress with support from NZTA it will be necessary for developers and councils to commit to a complimentary set of initiatives such as minimum densities (likely to be in excess of 20 dwellings / ha), delivery of PT services, a package of Travel Demand Management initiatives and the delivery of bus priority measures and cycleway improvements.

 

 

Both the Long-Term and Early Works business cases are taking longer to complete than anticipated. This is likely to affect the project timeframes for progressing the Tauriko West project. This issue is subject to ongoing discussion between TCC and Waka Kotahi. 

 

Tauriko Long-Term Detailed Business Case

·      Continue assessment of the ‘long-list’ options to then take forward for multi-criteria analysis to identify a preferred option. 

·      Ensure all options have been captured in the long-list assessment.

·      Agree scope issues with Waka Kotahi.

·      Preparation for community engagement.

 

Tauriko Early Works Detailed Business Case

·      Prepare scope for additional study on a future ring road between the Tauriko Business Estate and SH36, to align with wastewater and storm water studies.  This focuses on the crossing of the Kopurererua Stream and the form of the connection to SH36.

·      Further development of design to respond to the completed Road Safety Audit process.

·      Preparation for community engagement.

·      Continue to develop Tauriko West internal collector road cross section. 

 


Project

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

Multi Modal Projects

Bus facility – Arataki

·      A paper on both options for the Arataki Bus Facility was presented to the UFTD committee on 21 July 2020. 

·      Point of Entry discussions are ongoing with Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency to define the preferred type of business case process.

 

·      Preparations for establishing the Arataki Community Liaison Group are currently in progress.

·      Option design and cost estimates will be undertaken as agreed by UFTD to inform the engagement process.

Bus Facility – City Centre 

·      An improved city centre bus facility is identified in the now Waka Kotahi endorsed Te Papa Spatial Framework IBC. This provides a basis for potential National Land Transport Fund investment towards a bus facility (subject to more detailed business case analysis and funding availability).

·      The bus facility project is on hold while wider City Centre and Civic Administration Building (CAB) matters are resolved. Once these projects are clarified an initial step will be to develop a ‘Point of Entry’ with Waka Kotahi to scope a business case and confirm NLTF funding availability towards investigating the preferred location and form of a bus facility.       

 

Public Transport (PT) Implementation Plan 2019-2022

Project to provide a detailed plan to implement the PT Blueprint

·      TCC staff continue to work with BoPRC on the PT Implementation Plan.

·      Larger projects such as bus facilities, park n ride, building PT capability into the transport model, and PT priority (such as Cameron Road) are included in the Implementation Plan and are reported separately.

·      Smaller projects are reported through the Project Services and Operations Committee and include:

Roll out of bus shelters. All approved shelters have been installed, hearings can now be reinstated to make decisions on unapproved shelters (this was on-hold due to COVID-19)

Roll out of real-time information boards which is ongoing

·      Enforcement of bus priority measures

 

·      In the short term the PT Implementation Plan will continue to roll out.

·      The BoPRC are working on a Public Transport Activity Plan for the western Bay of Plenty to align the service delivery to the UFTI and TSP projects. It is anticipated that the Public Transport Implementation Plan will be replaced by the Shared Implementation Plan of the TSP and address both services and infrastructure.

Cameron Road Corridor Improvements 

The project is focused on achieving improved multi-modal outcomes and enabling quality intensification outcomes on the Te Papa peninsular.

A staged delivery of the full Cameron Road corridor project is underway. The current stage focusses on delivery in the short to medium term (out to 10 years).  The section of Cameron Road from Harrington Street to Seventeenth Avenue will be constructed first.

·      Crown Infrastructure Partners (CIP) funding confirmed for Stage 1 (Harington Street – 17th Avenue) of the Cameron Road project.

·      The Project team is now working to accelerate the original project programme to meet the timeline agreed with CIP (e.g. November 2020: Complete Preliminary design; Sept 2021: Main construction works commence; October 2023: Practical completion). Project management services are being secured to support this.

·      CIP funding includes development of the Stage 2 (17th Avenue – Barkes Corner) business case including preliminary design to be completed by October 2023.

·      Service (e.g. water & wastewater) renewal or upgrade investigations are being undertaken. There is an opportunity to integrate and align its delivery with the construction programme and timeline agreed with CIP. Funding for this work will need to be considered through the LTP process.

·      Procurement process to appoint a contractor is underway. Tenders will be evaluated in mid-October and two contractors shortlisted to provide input to the detailed design process, prior to tendering between them for the main construction package (anticipated April 2020).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

·      Project communications is being delivered through ENews and website updates.

·      Engagement workshops with the Stakeholder and Community Liaison Groups on the Preliminary design is being planned for the end October.

·      Wider public consultation is being planned for November 2020. This will likely include a mix of larger and smaller sessions at key community locations within Te Papa. The consultation will involve both ‘inform’ and ‘consult’ items given certain design components are now established through the agreement with CIP.

·      Work with tangata whenua will continue with discussions to be held on the Preliminary design and also Detailed design (when the project reaches that stage).

Detailed design tender process programmed to run from September through to early November with the Detailed design to start prior to the end of 2020.

 

 

 

Cycle Plan Implementation (Accessible Streets) 

·      The route option analysis for the prioritised areas of Otumoetai/Bellevue and Papamoa-Mount Maunganui is progressing. This work is integrated into the development of the TSP SOF to inform its broader route mode prioritisaiton, network gap and option/activity analysis.

·      Key next steps for the project are enabled through the completion of the TSP SOF and agreement to the priority activities (e.g. single-stage business case to confirm the cycle network design for the Otumoetai/Bellevue area).

 

·      Councillor workshop to be held on the route option analysis work.

·      Contingent on agreement to the TSP SOF and prioritised activities which enables the scoping of business case to prioritise development of required Single-Stage business cases (e.g. for the Otumoetai/Bellevue area).

 

 

Project

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

Projects - Funding

Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency (NZTA) Funding

Risk associated with receiving NZTA support funding for key transport projects.

·      UFTI and Accessible Streets programme business cases and the Te Papa Spatial Framework Indicative business cases endorsed by the Waka Kotahi Board.

·      Maunganui Road Single-Stage business case to secure NZTA funding approval for construction is complete. Detailed design is almost complete with construction to follow.   

·     Several workstreams remain underway in relation to the:

o Te Tumu structure planning process. These are discussed under the Eastern Corridor Transport Planning topic update in this Table.

o Western Corridor including Tauriko West. These are discussed under the Western Corridor topic update in this Table.

The Single-Stage business case (Lite) for safety improvements for pedestrians and cyclists on Totara Street is progressing. Engagement with stakeholders and community is continuing, as is final modelling, all of which will inform and refine the business case further. Submission for co-funding to Waka Kotahi is programmed for late 2020 with construction to follow approval.

 

·      Risk of certain projects not receiving funding in a timely manner, or not at all. This is largely dependent on the impact of COVID-19 on Waka Kotahi revenue collection through fuel tax and registration fees. The impact is not yet known. The NZTA have advised that additional scrutiny is being applied by their Board to funding decisions, but they have also advised TCC to continue with submissions for co-funding as previously expected.

·      Continuing to work with NZTA on co-funded business cases for example the TSP which includes seeking alignment on programmes for submission to the Regional Land Transport Plan.

 

 


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

 

Project Description

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

Planning Projects

Wastewater Projects

Eastern Corridor wastewater study

Study purpose is to review corridor needs and progress a concept to renew and upgrade the existing wastewater trunk network (including pump stations) from the boundary of Te Tumu to the Te Maunga wastewater treatment plant.

Much of the upgrades to the wastewater system along the eastern corridor are required regardless of whether Te Tumu is being developed to accommodate growth in Papamoa and Wairakei and to address existing operational and renewal issues.

·      Feasibility study has been finalised and identified a preferred route alignment. Natural hazards resilience a key consideration in options assessment.

·      Finalised feasibility study has been presented to UFTD committee on the 9th of June and endorsed in principal.

·      An independent consultancy (ALTA) review costs and revised budgets from last LTP are being entered into the proposed LTP.

 

·      After confirmation of budget availability through the LTP process projects will progress to preliminary design and detailed design for staged delivery.

·      Develop a programme of communication and engagement with the community as the project will go through a range of established urban areas and communities.

 

Western Corridor Wastewater Study

Study purpose is to identify preferred trunk network (including pump stations) to service the western growth area, including Tauriko West, Lower and Upper Belk, Keenan, Joyce and Merrick Road areas.  Some of these areas have been confirmed by the SmartGrowth Partnership for urbanisation while others are potential long-term growth options.  The network would connect to the Southern Pipeline via Maleme Street, Greerton. A core consideration for this study is the staging to service the various planned and potential growth areas over time.

·      The feasibility study has been finalised and endorsed the proposed solution. It also endorsed the timely implementation of the interim part of the solution subject to budget being available.

 

·      The preliminary design of the interim solution has been commissioned and is being progressed.

·      Project costs are being entered into the proposed LTP.

·      Continue design and delivery of interim part of solution.

 

 


 

Project Description

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

Planning Projects

Wastewater Projects

Te Maunga Ocean Outfall Project

The ocean outfall is a critical component of the public wastewater network.  It is in poor condition (both landward and marine sections) and cannot physically withstand the pressures required to deliver the consented maximum discharge rate of 900 L/s.  Increasing wastewater flows due to growth are also raising the average daily volumes and peak flows placing further pressure on the outfall system.  

These constraints mean that Council must, to build resilience and mitigate the consequence of failure undertake a review into the future of the marine section and upgrade the landward section. 

The landward upgrade is programmed to commence in the 2020/21 financial year (late 2020) and the marine section is currently programmed in the LTP to be operational by 2028.

 

·      The need for this project is being discussed with the Wastewater Review Committee. Members of the committee raised concerns about the use of the previous desludging pond as a flow balancing pond. The full removal of this pond would require a wider assessment of storage and flow management options throughout the network.

·      The feasibility of relining the existing marine section of the outfall pipe has been assessed and concluded that relining is generally possible.  Further tests to confirm the condition of the existing pipeline need to be carried out before a final call on this option and the potential cost can be made. This is currently being delayed due to COVID.

 

·      Landward upgrade – First stage of a two-stage procurement process has commenced for procurement of a contractor for construction. Community engagement campaign will commence 1 October 2020 to inform local residents of the project 

·      Pipe Condition Survey has commenced. First stage completed and waiting for a suitable weather window to complete the survey.

·      Continue discussions with Wastewater Management Review Committee.

·      Continue with the implementation of the landward section of the coastal outfall.

·      Carry out a review of the coastal outfall options in consideration of the identified issues. This will be done in line with the strategic wastewater planning and modelling project and will take the form of an Indicative Business Case which is due to commence in October.

·      Proceed with engagement of a cultural advisor to prepare an overarching cultural engagement plan to encompass the majority of wastewater workstreams underway.  The plan would ensure that Council has a cohesive approach to cultural engagement going forward.  This Plan would be presented to the Wastewater Management Committee for their endorsement prior to its implementation.     

 

 

 

City Intensification (Te Papa)

·      Te Papa intensification scenario has been modelled, and strategic network upgrades have been identified and incorporated in the proposed LTP.

·      In addition, budgets for local network upgrades have been identified through a spatial planning exercise and have been entered into the proposed LTP. This exercise also identified areas where intensification in Te Papa can be facilitated more easily or require wastewater upgrades first. This has been based on Te Papa intensification maps used for public engagement.

·      Further refinements of infrastructure investment requirements are underway to facilitate Te Papa intensification plan.

 

·      After confirmation of budget availability through the LTP process projects will be further refined through feasibility studies.

 


Project Description

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

Planning Projects

Water Supply Projects

Western Corridor Water Supply Study

Study purpose is to identify preferred water supply trunk network to service the western growth area, including Tauriko West, Lower and Upper Belk, Keenan, Joyce and Merrick Road areas.  Some of these areas have been confirmed by the SmartGrowth Partnership for urbanisation while others are potential long-term growth options. A core consideration for this study is the staging to service the various planned and potential growth areas over time.

The western corridor is and will be serviced by the existing water take at Joyce Road.

·      The Western Corridor Water Supply Study has been delivered and is internally being reviewed.

·      As part of this work it has become apparent that the city’s water supply is under more pressure than previously understood. This will largely be relieved when the Waiari water supply comes on stream currently scheduled for 2022. Further investigations through the development of the 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy for Water Supply identified the critical pieces of work to address this issue.

·      Identified projects have been entered into the proposed LTP.

·      Servicing additional growth areas in the western corridor is constrained in the short-term due to availability of water supply from our existing water takes and treatment plant capacity until the new water take from Waiari and all related network upgrades have been carried out. This may also have implications for the ability to accommodate large water users.

·      The next step is to complete the study and report it to UFTD.

 

Eastern Corridor Water supply

(extension of current pipeline work from Waiari to the Mount)

·      Stage 1 is currently being delivered by the PMO.

·      Stage 2 (Welcome Bay roundabout to Mangatawa) requires a feasibility study before it can move forward to delivery.

·      Stage 3 (Mangatawa to Mount Maunganui) concept option report has been received.

·      Updated budgets are being entered into the proposed LTP.

·      The Papamoa and Mount suburbs are currently being supplied with water from the Joyce Treatment Plant. The extension of the Waiari water supply all the way to the Mount is critical to take off pressure on the Joyce supply network so capacity can be reallocated to service growth in the western corridor.

·      The key next step for planning is to complete the Stage 3 option report and report to UFTD.

City Intensification (Te Papa)

·      Te Papa intensification scenario has been modelled, and strategic network upgrades have been identified and incorporated in the proposed LTP.

·      In addition, budgets for local network upgrades have been identified through a spatial planning exercise and have been entered into the proposed LTP. This exercise also identified areas where intensification in Te Papa can be facilitated more easily or require wastewater upgrades first. This has been based on Te Papa intensification maps used for public engagement.

·      Further refinements of infrastructure investment requirements are underway to facilitate Te Papa intensification plan.

·      After confirmation of budget availability through the LTP process projects will be further refined through feasibility studies.

 

 

 


Project Description

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

Planning Projects

Stormwater Projects

Tauriko West comprehensive stormwater consent

The purpose of this project is the preparation of a comprehensive stormwater resource consent for this growth area to be lodged at the time of the plan change notification to ensure good alignment of stormwater and land use planning.

The resource consent will guide how developers manage stormwater in Tauriko West. Stormwater infrastructure costs fall on developers not the Council.

·      An initial planning assessment against current policy and regional plan provisions has been carried out.

·      A stormwater design philosophy has been drafted for the Tauriko West development area, which will form the basis of the stormwater management plan and any associated consent applications. Landowners and developers are currently providing input into this document.

·      A stormwater management plan to support the comprehensive consent application is currently being developed taking into consideration the proposed changes to the National Policy Statement and National Environmental Standard for Freshwater Management.

·      Consultant services have been procured to prepare the comprehensive stormwater consent application which will be processed by the Bay of Plenty Regional Council.

·      Complete stormwater design philosophy.

·      Progress development of stormwater consent application.

·      The final National Policy Statement National and National Environmental Standards for Freshwater have been gazetted. They have a strong focus on the protection and enhancement of wetlands and streams. Depending on the interpretation of provisions, it could have significant impacts on urban development. A key point we are currently discussing with BOPRC is, if there is a possibility to realign a stream to create more developable land.

Te Tumu stormwater

Council is preparing a Stormwater Strategy with landowners to guide the philosophy and implementation of stormwater management in Te Tumu. Most of the infrastructure will be delivered by developers, with the exception of the Kaituna Overflow which is to be delivered by Council.

The Kaituna overflow is a proposed stormwater channel to allow excess floodwater in Papamoa, Wairakei and Te Tumu to spill into the Kaituna River rather than flood the community. Planning for a flood relief overflow on the coast has been ongoing since the 1990s, and in 2008 the Kaituna overflow was consented through the Papamoa Comprehensive Stormwater Consent. The Kaituna overflow channel is required to be constructed as part of the development of Te Tumu. It will be integrated into the development to provide amenity and recreational values as well as flood management

 

·      The Stormwater Strategy is being completed. However, this will require reassessment in light of recent freshwater reforms to understand any changes that may be required as a result of the new national policy.

·      Natural hazard assessment is being undertaken for a range of hazards in Te Tumu to mitigate risk. Building on learnings from Canterbury earthquakes, the overflow channel design will need significant geotechnical works to mitigate risks from the banks spreading in an earthquake.

·      Undertake a review of the stormwater strategy considering the new NPS freshwater management.

·      Update flood modelling and risk assessment once updated BOPRC Kaituna River model is available.

·      Continue natural hazard investigation and mitigation to understand various options and costs.

·      Continue engagement with Regional Council and tangata whenua on stormwater planning.

·      Risks include effects on project viability through national policy changes, opposition to works, and further cost estimate escalation. Council is engaging with stakeholder to understand and mitigate these risks.

 

Nanako Stormwater Consent

A stormwater consent is required to enable discharge of stormwater to the Nanako Stream to enable development of residential zoned land in the Pyes Pa West (The Lakes) area, primarily the undeveloped land in the vicinity of Kennedy Road. The consent will require construction of stormwater devices like ponds, and wetlands, as well as improvements to Kennedy Road where this acts as a dam.

·      Stormwater consent application has been lodged with BOPRC. Stage 1 of the consent (Kennedy Road component) is expected to be granted soon. Stage 2 of the consent (downstream part) is expected to be limited notified to current landowner.

·      Progress required land acquisitions – initial discussions with landowners identify that there are some risks around land acquisition. If necessary, Council has compulsory acquisition powers under the Public Works Act. It appears that land acquisition processes may delay the ability to deliver the stormwater system necessary to enable land development to continue north of Kennedy Rd.

·      Commence physical works for stormwater solution for land south of Kennedy Rd once consent is granted.

 

City Intensification (Te Papa)

·      The Te Papa design sprint identified that the idea of opening up overland flow/stream corridors with the aim of reducing the amount of flood prone areas is sensible. These blue/green networks would also contribute to the amenity value of the area.

·      Cost estimates for the for 30-year infrastructure strategy and 10-year LTP have been made and will be entered into the proposed LTP.

 

 

·      Continue to explore establishment of blue/green network for Te Papa and general stormwater network capacity for 10-year rainfall event LOS.

Large Dam Safety Upgrades (City Wide)

·      A desk top assessment identified around 40 dams in the Tauranga city area, which would be covered by the new dam safety regulation. In our asset database we only have 3 dams listed.

·      A meeting with Trustpower Dam Safety Expert was held during Level 4 lockdown and emphasised planning related issues identified by TCC staff. (Operational matters were also covered in this meeting.)

·      A programme including operational budgets for initial dam assessments and a capital works estimate has been developed and is being put forward to council to consider as part of the LTP process.

 

·      The new regulation is likely to be approved soon after the upcoming central government elections. The operations team will then have to implement procedures for looking after these dams.

 

 

 


Project Description

Current Update (key matters)

Next Steps and Identified Risks

Planning Projects

Three Waters Modelling Projects / 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy

Water Supply Modelling

·      The water supply planning model has been updated and is now available to support LTP and 30-year infrastructure planning.

·      Through the update and planning work on the 30-year infrastructure strategy it has come to light that the existing model has some short comings and that it would be of advantage to consider the build of a new planning model using different software. This will be put forward to consider as part of the LTP process.

·      Next steps are to continue to:

-       Use the model to test water demand management options in regard to their effects on the water supply network, and

-       Explore hydrological model option for resilience planning to fully understand the cities vulnerability of instream low flows and demand needs. This will be put forward to consider as part of the LTP process.

 

Wastewater modelling

·      Dry weather models including all network pipes in place for the whole city. However, wet weather situations are not satisfactorily reflected in model.

·      A strategic model (reflecting the main trunk network) is currently being built, which will be calibrated to simulate wet weather events. A good understanding of the network performance during wet weather is critical to understand risks of potential overflows into our streams and harbour.

·      Strategic monitoring of wet weather flows in the network is accompanying the build-up of the strategic model.

·      Initial results of the strategic model have been used to inform the proposed LTP. However, further refinements will be expected thereafter for the following LTP.

·      The calibrated strategic model has been delivered and has been used for intensification modelling.

 

 

·      Continue to refine the strategic model, so it is fully calibrated against wet weather flows.

·      Use model to help inform a Level of Service discussion with the community as proposed in the 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy.

Stormwater modelling

·      Flood models are in place for all areas in Tauranga.

·      Updates to these models are ongoing to include new developments across the city, updated information on climate change (e.g. rainfall intensities and sea level rise) and general modelling improvements.

·      All urban flood models have been updated to support Plan Change 27 (TCC Flood Hazard).

·      The development of a hydrological model for everyday flows with an added water quality function to inform decisions under the new National Policy Statement and National Environmental Standards for Freshwater is being put forward as part of the LTP process.

 

·      Refine presentation of flood model outputs, so flood plains, overland flow paths, and flood prone areas are clearly distinguished on our future flood maps.

30 Year Infrastructure Strategy

·      A specific 30-year Infrastructure Plan for each of the three waters has been prepared and is currently being refined. These plans provide the basis for the water related parts of the overarching TCC 30 Year Infrastructure Strategy, provide direction for strategic decision making, and inform LTP development.

 

·      Present key aspects of these strategies to council as part of the LTP Asset Management presentation in October.

 

 

   


Urban Form and Transport Development Committee Meeting Agenda

13 October 2020

 

10        Discussion of Late Items



[1] Evidence suggests residential change in intensification areas generally occurs at a rate of about 10% every 10 years (Auckland Unitary Plan Hearings Panel evidence and related studies).