AGENDA

 

Ordinary Council meeting

Monday, 27 June 2022

I hereby give notice that an Ordinary Meeting of Council will be held on:

Date:

Monday, 27 June 2022

Time:

9.30am 

Location:

Bay of Plenty Regional Council Chambers

Regional House

1 Elizabeth Street

Tauranga

Please note that this meeting will be livestreamed and the recording will be publicly available on Tauranga City Council's website: www.tauranga.govt.nz.

Marty Grenfell

Chief Executive

 


Terms of reference – Council

 

 

Membership

Chairperson

Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Members

Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Commissioner Bill Wasley

Quorum

Half of the members physically present, where the number of members (including vacancies) is even; and a majority of the members physically present, where the number of members (including vacancies) is odd.

Meeting frequency

As required

Role

·                To ensure the effective and efficient governance of the City

·                To enable leadership of the City including advocacy and facilitation on behalf of the community.

Scope

·                Oversee the work of all committees and subcommittees.

·                Exercise all non-delegable and non-delegated functions and powers of the Council.

·         The powers Council is legally prohibited from delegating include:

o   Power to make a rate.

o   Power to make a bylaw.

o   Power to borrow money, or purchase or dispose of assets, other than in accordance with the long-term plan.

o   Power to adopt a long-term plan, annual plan, or annual report

o   Power to appoint a chief executive.

o   Power to adopt policies required to be adopted and consulted on under the Local Government Act 2002 in association with the long-term plan or developed for the purpose of the local governance statement.

o   All final decisions required to be made by resolution of the territorial authority/Council pursuant to relevant legislation (for example: the approval of the City Plan or City Plan changes as per section 34A Resource Management Act 1991).

·         Council has chosen not to delegate the following:

o   Power to compulsorily acquire land under the Public Works Act 1981.

·         Make those decisions which are required by legislation to be made by resolution of the local authority.

·         Authorise all expenditure not delegated to officers, Committees or other subordinate decision-making bodies of Council.

·         Make appointments of members to the CCO Boards of Directors/Trustees and representatives of Council to external organisations.

·         Consider any matters referred from any of the Standing or Special Committees, Joint Committees, Chief Executive or General Managers.

Procedural matters

·         Delegation of Council powers to Council’s committees and other subordinate decision-making bodies.

·         Adoption of Standing Orders.

·         Receipt of Joint Committee minutes.

·         Approval of Special Orders.

·         Employment of Chief Executive.

·         Other Delegations of Council’s powers, duties and responsibilities.

Regulatory matters

Administration, monitoring and enforcement of all regulatory matters that have not otherwise been delegated or that are referred to Council for determination (by a committee, subordinate decision-making body, Chief Executive or relevant General Manager).

 

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

Order of Business

1          Opening karakia. 7

2          Apologies. 7

3          Public forum.. 7

4          Acceptance of late items. 7

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 7

6          Change to the order of business. 7

7          Confirmation of minutes. 8

7.1            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 28 February 2022. 8

7.2            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 March 2022. 28

7.3            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 23 May 2022. 40

7.4            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 May 2022. 57

7.5            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 7 June 2022. 78

7.6            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 June 2022. 84

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest 99

9          Deputations, presentations, petitions. 99

Nil

10       Recommendations from other committees. 99

Nil

11       Business. 100

11.1          Annual Plan 2022/23 - Adoption Report 100

11.2          Annual Plan 2022/23 - Other topics. 105

11.3          Rates Resolution 2022/2023. 107

11.4          Adopt Final 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy. 114

11.5          2021-31 Long-term Plan Amendment 117

11.6          Executive Report 120

11.7          Draft strategic framework. 163

11.8          Draft Environment Strategy and Draft Inclusive City Strategy. 201

11.9          Marine Park reclassification hearings report 251

12       Discussion of late items. 315

13       Public excluded session. 316

13.1          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 28 February 2022. 316

13.2          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 March 2022. 316

13.3          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 23 May 2022. 317

13.4          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 May 2022. 317

13.5          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 7 June 2022. 317

13.6          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 June 2022. 317

13.7          Exemption to open competition: Mauao Placemaking Project - professional services and physical works for cultural interpretation. 318

13.8          Council Resolution for Closed Competition - Kiwirail Underpass. 318

14       Closing karakia. 319

 

 


1            Opening karakia

2            Apologies

3            Public forum

4            Acceptance of late items

5            Confidential business to be transferred into the open

6            Change to the order of business


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

7            Confirmation of minutes

7.1         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 28 February 2022

File Number:           A13589051

Author:                    Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

Authoriser:             Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Council meeting held on 28 February 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.       Minutes of the Council meeting held on 28 February 2022 

  


Ordinary Council meeting Minutes

28 February 2022

 

 

 

MINUTES

Ordinary Council meeting

Monday, 28 February 2022

 


Order of Business

1          Opening karakia. 4

2          Apologies. 4

3          Public Forum.. 4

3.1            Nigel Tutt - Tauriko West 4

3.2            Richard Stilwell - Tauriko West 5

4          Acceptance of late items. 5

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 6

6          Change to the order of business. 6

7          Confirmation of Minutes. 6

7.1            Minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 14 February 2022. 6

7.2            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 8 February 2022. 6

7.3            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 6 December 2021. 6

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest 7

9          Deputations, Presentations, Petitions. 7

9.1            Papamoa Residents and Ratepayers Association - Links Ave Petition and Report 7

10       Recommendations from Other Committees. 7

10.1          Terms of Reference for Tangata Whenua/Tauranga City Council Committee. 7

11       Business. 8

11.1          Long-term Plan Amendment Financials. 8

11.2          Te Manawataki O Te Papa (Civic Precinct) programme Governance Structure and Key Project Approval Processes. 9

11.3          2022/2023 -  Draft User Fees and Charges Update. 11

13.6          TCC’s Infrastructure Funding and Financial proposals – TSP and Tauriko West 12

11.4          Executive Report 13

11.5          Tauriko West - Enabling Works Business Case. 15

12       Discussion of Late Items. 16

13       Public excluded session. 16

13.1          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 8 February 2022. 17

13.2          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 6 December 2021. 17

13.3          Litigation Report 17

13.4          Commercial Land Assessable for Rates. 18

13.5          Addressing vessels at risk on Bridge Wharf 18

L.6            TCC's Infrastructure Funding and Financing proposals - TSP and Tauriko West 18

Confidential Attachment 3     11.5 - Tauriko West - Enabling Works Business Case. 18

14       Closing karakia. 18

 


MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Ordinary Council meeting

HELD AT THE Bay of Plenty Regional Council Chambers, Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga

ON Monday, 28 February 2022 AT 10am

 

 

PRESENT:                 Commission Chair Anne Tolley, Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston, Commissioner Stephen Selwood, Commissioner Bill Wasley

IN ATTENDANCE:    Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Tony Aitken (Acting General Manager: People & Engagement), Paul Davidson (General Manager: Corporate Services), Barbara Dempsey (General Manager: Regulatory & Compliance), Nic Johansson (General Manager: Infrastructure), Christine Jones (General Manager: Strategy & Growth), Gareth Wallis (General Manager: Community Services), Kathryn Sharplin (Manager: Finance), Frazer Smith (Manager: Strategic Finance & Growth), Tracey Hughes (Financial Insights & Reporting Manager), Jim Taylor (Manager: Transactional Services), Jeremy Boase (Manager: Strategy and Corporate Planning), Andrew Mead (Manager: City and Infrastructure Planning), Mike Naude (Programme Manager - Civic Redevelopment Projects), Brendan Bisley (Director of Transport), Alistair Talbot (Team Leader: Transport Strategy & Planning), Ben Corbett (Team Leader: Growth Funding), Coral Hair (Manager: Democracy Services), Robyn Garrett (Team Leader: Committee Support), Sarah Drummond (Committee Advisor), Anahera Dinsdale (Committee Advisor)

 

1            Opening Karakia

Commissioner Rolleston opened the meeting with a karakia.

 

2            Apologies

Nil

3            Public Forum

3.1         Nigel Tutt - Tauriko West 

 

Key points

·         Noted the importance of the Tauriko West development to the local economy – 6,000 to 12,000 jobs expected in the Tauriko Business Estate.

·         Public transport was a must for employees and residents for quality of life, access to jobs, sustainability and emission reduction.

·         Key transport route included part of SH29; vital for the Port and for connection to the Golden Triangle.

·         Emphasised the urgency of SH29 works; ideally the work would have been done already and needed to be done as quickly as possible.

 

In response to questions

·         The Waka Kotahi Business Case barely mentioned the 12000 jobs or up to 15000 homes that could be in the area. Vital to connect not only by road but by public transport. Current central government evaluation processes did not take sufficiently into account the wider social and economic benefits of the proposal.

·         Often repeating work that had already been undertaken as part of urban growth strategy planning; should be able to leapfrog over some of the Waka Kotahi business planning process.

 

 

3.2         Richard Stilwell - Tauriko West   

 

Key points

·         Not opposed to the development in Tauriko West or the business estate; but Tauranga Crossing was concerned about work proceeding in a partial way.

·         Business case was part of a package – the enabling works needed to be considered as a part of a larger suite of public transport works and transport planning.

·         The enabling works were the first of three stages; the expected outcomes were slight by themselves and needed to be part of the wider package.

·         Objectives could not be met by the enabling works on their own.

·         Key risk is that future elements would not follow.

·         The investment objectives relied on delivery of all the parts of the package; could not be achieved purely by the enabling works.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Recognised the disconnect between government policy in terms of housing/public transport/carbon emissions; some of the processes in place reflected this disconnect and did not provide certainty.  Work on the bigger project needed to start now.

·         Supported the point about the disconnect and the need for the whole package to be committed – however, necessary to start with the enabling works.  Bigger project needed to be fast-tracked and certainty provided.  Needs of the region were urgent.

 

4            Acceptance of late items

Resolution  CO4/22/1

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

Accepts the following late item for consideration in the public excluded section of the meeting:

•        TCC’s Infrastructure Funding and Financing proposals – TSP and Tauriko West

Carried

 

5            Confidential business to be transferred into the open

Resolution  CO4/22/2

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council transfers the late item report TCC’s Infrastructure Funding and Financing proposals – TSP and Tauriko West from public excluded session into open session for consideration.

Carried

6            Change to the order of business

Nil

7            Confirmation of Minutes

7.1         Minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 14 February 2022

Resolution  CO4/22/3

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commission Chair Anne Tolley

That the minutes of the Extraordinary Council meeting held on 14 February 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

7.2         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 8 February 2022

Resolution  CO4/22/4

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the minutes of the Council meeting held on 8 February 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record, subject to the following corrections:

·         Omanawa Falls – further clarification provided regarding evaluation of revenue opportunities and charges;

·         Acceptance of Mr Paterson’s late submission be included in the resolution

Carried

 

7.3         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 6 December 2021

Resolution  CO4/22/5

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the minutes of the Council meeting held on 6 December 2021 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

8            Declaration of conflicts of interest

Nil

9            Deputations, Presentations, Petitions

9.1         Papamoa Residents and Ratepayers Association - Links Ave Petition and Report

 

External    Philip Brown, Papamoa Residents and Ratepayers Association (PRRA)

 

Key points

·         The petition presented to TCC on 25 November had called for an immediate end to the Links Ave trial, improved engagement and consultation, and full disclosure of any information gathered by TCC.

·         Considered full and proper community consultation was not undertaken.

·         Supported removal of the bus lane.  Should be no bus lanes or bus routes on Links Ave, was moved due to the B2B roadworks.

·         Did not support an extension of the trial.

·         Considered the trial a waste of time and that TCC was not listening to the residents.

·         PRRA requested full disclosure of traffic and usage data, and bus patronage.  Did not consider the data publicly available was complete or reliable.

·         Considered the proposed closure was overkill for the problem; the closure could be time-limited for specific periods.

·         Need to consider data from other surrounding roads as well as Links Ave.

·         Requested a road user committee be formed of residents and TCC staff to oversee the trial.

·         Requested TCC hold a “Town Hall” meeting of all concerned residents on the Links Ave proposals.

 

Discussion points raised

·         In the short-term Links Ave was a residential street and not intended as an arterial.  Council must take account of the safety report received that there was a significant risk for school children using that street.  A bigger long-term piece of work regarding how Papamoa residents travelled into town and to work was already underway.

·         All data used in the decisions had been provided to residents; TCC did not have the bus patronage data which had been requested from Bay of Plenty  Regional Council (BOPRC).

·         Noted the formation of the joint Tauranga Public Transport committee with BOPRC, which would look at how achieve integrated public transport around the city.  Use of public transport on the B2B route would come to that committee for consideration.

·         All traffic data used in the decision-making process was in the public domain.

 

 

10          Recommendations from Other Committees

10.1       Terms of Reference for Tangata Whenua/Tauranga City Council Committee

Staff          Coral Hair, Manager: Democracy Services

 

Key points

·         Move to more marae-based meetings with formal and informal parts.

·         Included the development of a work programme.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Great initiative to engage with hapū at their place.

Resolution  CO4/22/6

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Approves the recommendations from the Tangata Whenua/Tauranga City Council Committee of 16 February 2022 and adopts the following changes to the Terms of Reference for the Tangata Whenua/Tauranga City Council Committee.

(i)      Remove distinction of formal and informal meetings.

(ii)     Six meetings per year to be held on marae.

(iii)     Members of Te Rangapū Mana Whenua o Tauranga Moana be invited to all six meetings. At the Chairperson’s discretion, Te Rangapū Mana Whenua o Tauranga Moana members may speak to reports. To avoid doubt only members of the Committee can move or second recommendations or vote.

(iv)    Hapū presentations to be held at the beginning of each meeting.

(v)     The remainder of the business of the Tangata Whenua/Tauranga City Council Committee will be held at the conclusion of the hapū presentation.

(vi)    Minutes will be confirmed at each meeting.

(vii)   The decision on appointing a Deputy Chairperson will be deferred until the new Independent Chairperson is appointed.

(viii)   Livestreaming of meetings will continue. Livestreaming of presentations by hapū will be subject to permission from the marae.

Carried

 

11          Business

11.1       Long-term Plan Amendment Financials

Staff          Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

Josh Logan, Team Leader: Corporate Planning

Frazer Smith, Manager: Strategic Finance & Growth

Tracey Hughes, Finance Insights & Reporting Manager

 

Key points

·         Introduced the concept of Infrastructure Funding and Financing (IFF) levies.

·         Outlined what rate options would look like without the IFF levies; looking at around 16%.

·         IFF levy brought that rate number down; provided the ability to smooth the cost of infrastructure over a longer period; did not require the high levels of debt retirement in early years that would be required for balance sheets.

 

In response to questions

·         Option 1C was the preferred option but other options would be included in the consultation as well.

·         Extra costs for civic centre rebuild were included in a targeted rate.

·         Operational costs included interest and debt costs as well as operational costs, so only new investments were proposed to be included in the community targeted rate, existing library costs were included in the general rate.  As new projects came on, they would be included in the targeted rate so the general rate would start to reduce.

·         Grant funding was still subject to confirmation; the resolution passed capped ratepayer contribution at $150m.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Need to think carefully about how to explain the different options to the community.  Need a very clear ‘with and without’ comparison so the benefits were clearly explained.

 

Resolution  CO4/22/7

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report Long-term Plan Amendment Financials;

Carried

The remaining report recommendations were left to lie until after the Infrastructure Funding and Financial proposals report had been considered; and were then put to the vote.

 

Resolution  CO4/22/8

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(i)      Agrees to the proposed updates to the draft financials for the proposed 2021-31 Long-term Plan Amendment,

(ii)     Agrees to include the proposed Crown Infrastructure Partners Levies within the Long-term Plan amendment with offset adjustments to transportation targeted rates applying from 2025,

iii)      Confirms that Option 1c be included in the draft LTPA as the preferred option and the rating reduction that may be achieved through the introduction of IFF levies requires further analysis and confirmation and will be finalised when Council adopts the draft LTPA on 24 March 2022.

Carried

Attachments

1        LTPA Graphs

 

11.2       Te Manawataki O Te Papa (Civic Precinct) programme Governance Structure and Key Project Approval Processes

Staff          Marty Grenfell, Chief Executive

Mike Naude, Programme Manager: Civic Redevelopment Projects

 

External    David Lambie, TwentyTwo

John Brockies, Chair Governance Group

 

Key points

·         The report brought the framework of governance and delivery of the civic precinct project to Council for approval, needed assurance that the project was structured and resourced for success.

·         Processes and steps for checking and approval were outlined in the report, for each component of the project, with the appropriate gateways and decision points noted.

·         Governance structure was working well so far, with a number of working and design groups established.  This model for delivery would be retained as the project moved forward.

·         The Governance Group Chair  noted that the Governance Group had collectively spent time going through all the requirements for the project and was confident to recommend this structure which drew on subject matter experts but within the Willis Bond agreement framework.  Checks and balances were included to ensure the partnering agreement was working effectively and equitably.  Confident had the right strategy and structure but would be actively refining as different stages of the project were reached. 

·         Having commissioners chairing a couple of the steering groups was a deliberate decision, to ensure that the Commission’s view on integration was reflected throughout and the focus on future generations maintained.

·         The governance structure struck a balance between good leadership and good experience, and drew Willis Bond as development partner into the decision-making framework.

 

In response to questions

·         Suggested that a Council “box” be included in the governance structure diagram as the overall accountable body.  Responsibility for delivery and implementation sat with the Chief Executive and this responsibility should be reflected in the Terms of Reference.

·         Mana whenua representation was not necessarily provided for as members of each steering group but were involved as subject matter experts.  Mana whenua cultural input needed to be reflected across all steering groups and Josh Te Kani had been appointed to fulfil that function.

·         Acknowledged restoration and historic importance of the site to mana whenua.

 

Resolution  CO4/22/9

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives this report Te Manawataki O Te Papa (Civic Precinct) programme Governance Structure and Key Project Approval Processes Report.

(b)     Approves the Te Manawataki O Te Papa Governance and Project Structure:

(c)     Approves the following persons as Chairpersons of the Te Manawataki O Te Papa Governance Group and Project Steering Groups:

 

 

 

Governance/Project Steering Group

Chairpersons

Te Manawataki o Te Papa Governance Group

Independent Chairperson John Brockies

Library and Community Hub Steering Group

Commissioner Bill Wasley

Museum and Cultural Centre Steering Group

Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Civic Whare and Exhibition Facility Steering Group

Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Baycourt Refurbishment Steering Group

General Manager Community Services - Gareth Wallis

90 Devonport Road Commercial Building Fitout Steering Group

Independent Chairperson – David Lambie

 

(d)     Acknowledges the key project approval processes required for the implementation of the Te Manawataki O Te Papa Programme and the Commercial Development at 90 Devonport Road, as outlined in the Tauranga City Council and Willis Bond and Company (Tauranga) Partnering Agreement, signed 06 July 2018, to ensure appropriate Council oversight and decision-making.

Carried

 

11.3       2022/2023 -  Draft User Fees and Charges Update

Staff          Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

 

Key points

·         Updated schedule following feedback received from previous council meeting regarding inflation rates and volumetric water charging, and beachside cabin prices.

·         Revised schedule had adjusted general increases up to reflect the 5.9% inflation rate.

·         Beachside rates had been examined and looked at comparatively, and remained unchanged as considered at an appropriate price point.

·         Water volumetric charges had been increased slightly.

·         Dog registration charges were not included in the consultation document as dogs needed to be registered by 1 July 2022.  There would be a separate consultation process as a charge increase was proposed.

 

In response to questions

·         Noted the Commission focus on shifting away from general ratepayer charges to user pays; the adjustment of volumetric water charging should reflect water usage.  Raising water charges and fees might reduce the need to raise the rate as much – offset by water user fees rather than the cost sitting with the general ratepayer – needed to make these options clear to the community.

·         Funding was quarantined within the activity, though debt retirement funding allowed some flexibility.

Resolution  CO4/22/10

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report, 2022/2023 -  Draft User Fees and Charges Update.

(b)     Approves the draft user fees and charges as set out in Attachment 1, in order to form part of the supporting information for consultation on the 2022/23 Annual Plan.

(c)     Agrees to include in the annual plan an overall rates increase, including water volumetric charging of 13.7%. Notes that excluding water volumetric charging the overall rates increase is 13%.

Carried

 

13.6       TCC’s Infrastructure Funding and Financial proposals – TSP and Tauriko West

Staff          Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

                  Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy and Growth   

 

Key points

·         Noted the difference between the two projects in terms of the levy.

·         The IFF levy allowed smoothing of costs over a longer period of time.

·         Levy required going to market for financing which posed some risk as was an unknown in terms of interest rates.  Considered any risk offset by the overall benefits.

·         Levy placed a charge against every property, was irreversible and in place for 30 years.  Was a legislative charge that could not be undone.  Would be registered on Tauriko titles for new properties.  The Tauriko charge was against appropriate Tauriko West properties; TSP would be citywide.

·         IFF levy was only one part of funding for Tauriko West and TSP; council was working with Waka Kotahi and developers in terms of fair share of payment.

 

In response to questions

·         Levies were based on project estimates which could be variable.  Looking at funding $200m via IFF levy,  any subsequent changes would be funded by traditional funding methods such as rating and development contribution charges.  Once set, the IFF levy could not generate additional revenue.  TSP funding was for a bundle of projects and could be moved around the projects within the bundle; Tauriko West would have a tendered return before moving to IFF funding which would provide more certainty for quantum.  Need to be as certain as possible that project estimates were accurate and variation minimised.  Noted that IFF funding only provided a percentage of the costs; balance would be absorbed/provided elsewhere.

 

Discussion points raised

·         High debt levels, low rates and residential ratepayers bearing a significant portion of the burden of rates had not provided appropriate funding for the infrastructure needs of the city; these IFF levies were part of a concerted effort and workload to source alternative funding mechanisms.

·         The levy spread cost intergenerationally and transferred debt off TCC balance sheet and into a different structure.  TCC was one of the first councils taking advantage of the IFF tool.

·         Congratulated staff on the work spent getting these proposals to this point.

 

Resolution  CO4/22/11

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)       Receives report “Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposals – Transport Systems Plan and Tauriko West’.

(b)       Approves progressing the Infrastructure Funding and Financing levy proposals for the Transport Systems Plan and for Tauriko West.

(c)       Notes and confirms the following resolutions of the 21 February 2022 Council meeting with respect to the Tauriko West levy:

(i)        Agrees to consult through the Long-term Plan Amendment process on the proposal to establish an Infrastructure Funding and Financing (IFF) local levy for delivery of the infrastructure needed to enable the first 2,000 dwellings in Tauriko West.

(ii)       Approves the principle of ‘development fair share’ funding being applied.

(iii)      Notes that the expected level of the Tauriko West IFF levy will be circa $2,000 -$2,500 per annum. 

(iv)      Council to engage with developers / landowners on the further option of a mix of Tauriko West IFF levy and other developer / landowner funding arrangements with the requirement that these arrangements fully cover the development fair share costs.

(d)       Notes and confirms the following resolutions of the 21 February 2022 Council meeting with respect to the Transport System Plan Levy:

(i)        Agrees to include within the Long-term Plan Amendment preparation process the proposal to establish an Infrastructure Funding and Financing (IFF) citywide levy to enable delivery of ten Transport Systems Plan projects.

(ii)       Approves the levy charge being calculated at the same proportional share as the proposed allocation of transportation rates between residential and commercial ratepayers (50/50).

(e)       With respect to the Transport System Plan Levy, notes that TCC’s current estimates of the level of the Transport System Plan IFF levy will be, at the commencement of the levy, $75 - 85 for the median residential property and $570 - 630 for the median non-residential property. These estimates are subject to change.

 

Carried

 

At 11.32am the meeting adjourned.

At 11.42am the meeting reconvened.

 

11.4       Executive Report

Staff          Gareth Wallis, General Manager: Community Services

Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure Services

Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Regulatory & Compliance

Paul Davidson, General Manager Corporate Services

Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

Tony Aitken, Acting General Manager: People and Engagement

 

Key points

·         Noted the success of Angus Muir Christmas lighting installations on the Strand; noted that the library closed on Sunday and would reopen in one month in the He Puna Manawa.  Kulim Park playground had opened before Christmas, the rest of the park redevelopment would be finished by April.  Noted ongoing impact of COVID on events.

·         COVID impacts were putting real pressure on the infrastructure team externally and internally, with lead times for projects extending and supply of materials an issue.

·         Noted the move of the customer services team and the change in delivery of services as part of the physical work, now a concierge model. Noted the move into BOPRC Chambers and the work of the Democracy team to make that happen.

·         The IENZ audit was postponed due to Omicron.  Building consents had seen a huge influx of applications (up by 20% over the same period as last year) and there continued to be staff shortages.  TCC was checking with other councils to see if they could provide assistance and was looking to find contractors to help increase application turnover; however, turnover times were down.  Noted the impacts on house owner/applicants.  Staff were utilising Saturdays for site inspections.

·         Noted the citywide revaluation distribution; noted disruption to airport activity due to flight crew issues.

 

In response to questions

·         Considered that the governance input was too involved in the specifics of the Kulim Park project.  The basketball court was removed to allow the rest of the project to start; since the redevelopment had started there was good community feedback regarding the basketball court so it was added back in as the project was under budget.  If aspects significantly affected the project outcomes then would come back for further governance sign-off.

·         Need to provide for recreational needs for all age groups with city places and spaces, not just younger children.

·         Would be useful to understand where people are travelling from to attend the various destination parks, to then consider provision of these types of facilities on a network level.  Had very specific level of service requirements e.g. for playgrounds, but not well-developed in terms of play and recreation outcomes.

·         Strategic review of green spaces throughout the community was critical.

·         Detailed input into a project from a specific group e.g. disability access was required early on in a project.  The community partnerships team could access large parts/sectors of the community and foster/facilitate input into specific projects, internally need to be willing to accept that input early on.  Cross team and department collaboration was vital e.g. between Places and Spaces and Infrastructure.

·         Omanawa Falls process was delayed as responding to a request for additional information from another council.

·         Regarding cost estimations on projects, project scoping needed to be reviewed to ensure budgeting was as accurate as possible.  Aware of need to improve organisational performance in this regard – there had been an organisational restructure, Capital Projects Assurance Division (CPAD) was rolling out consistent templates and industry best practice for procurement and project management.  Noted that standards could increase/change over time which increased the cost required to meet those standards.

·         Need to ensure that cyclists could still use the cycleway network while various roading and infrastructure projects took place; also, signage about the works would be useful e.g. Totara Street and Cameron Rd.

·         Raised possibility of an extra rubbish/recycling pick up over the Christmas period. Including pickups from reserves and parks.

·         Noted the extension of the Epidemic Preparedness Order until 18 March, expected to be extended again at that point.

·         Ramifications of Court decision on mandates for police and NZDF unknown; at this stage Council had not lost any staff due to vaccination policies.

·         Citywide revaluations – some areas such as the CBD saw lower valuations than in the past which would flow onto rates with a lower increase. Much more disparity with commercial valuations in terms of impact of Covid.

 

Resolution  CO4/22/12

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Executive Report.

Carried

 

11.5       Tauriko West - Enabling Works Business Case

Staff          Alistair Talbot, Team Leader: Transport Strategy & Planning

Andy Mead, Manager, City and Infrastructure Planning

 

External    Jess Andrew, Waka Kotahi

 

Key points

·         Business case had identified a package of improvements in Tauriko West, which would enable 2000 new homes, enable Stage 3 of the Tauriko Business Case and part of the works necessary for Stage 4.

·         Noted travel planning improvements to promote multi-modal use and deliver the right transport demand pattern.

·         Works continued to be ongoing with funding partners; once the resolution was passed conversations could continue with Waka Kotahi, IFF and developers.

·         Engagement had continued with stakeholders, directly affected landowners, tangata whenua liaison group, Western Bay of Plenty District Council (WBOPDC), Bay of Plenty Regional Council (BOPRC) and the general Tauriko community.

·         Outlined risks for the project/business case.

·         Business case would be submitted by April; ongoing work with Waka Kotahi to confirm pre-implementation phase of work in term of acquisition and consenting.

·         Longer term business case would continue to be progressed, this vital to the further development of the area.

 

In response to questions

·         These works were part of a much larger development, all about live/work/play – a significant amount of house and job growth would result from the long-term development. It was frustrating that Waka Kotahi and other government processes were limited and did not facilitate certainty around the longer-term package of works.

·         Noted the significant shift in the costing of this project, this could undermine confidence in the process.

·         Interregional state highway traffic would be completely separated from local traffic, walking and cycling routes would still generally be on local road corridors.  Some of the options that would improve residents’ and community experience would not be realised until the longer-term Option B works were completed.

·         Overall water and wastewater costs were not significant.  Need to be conscious of changes in terms of concerns expressed around project scoping and cost estimates.

·         Clarification was sought around the various percentiles provided for costs. The 95 percentile related to 1/20 and included risk and P&E costs.  Use of percentiles provided a risk assessment tool for incorporating risk into cost estimates.  Costs included were peer reviewed; escalation of costs were considered at both the 3% and 6% level.  Waka Kotahi was involved in cost review to help achieve certainty of funding.

 

 

Discussion points raised

·         These resolutions approved a small part of a long-term project that would unlock significant housing and economic growth; however, council was required to work through a piecemeal stage by stage business case approval process.  The benefits of the project could be compromised by being forced into this incremental process, only made sense in terms of the wider social and economic benefits and outcomes. Criticality of accelerating Long term Option B must be recognised.

 

Resolution  CO4/22/13

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Endorses the Tauriko West Enabling Works business case for submission to Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency for their consideration and investment approval.

(b)     Notes the investment timing, estimated costs, cost sharing and funding sources as outlined in the Enabling Works business case are subject to final agreement through project partner decision-making (i.e. National Land Transport Fund) and wider processes associated with the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Levies and Infrastructure Acceleration Fund grants.

(c)     Notes that the project costs are estimated to be above those included in the Councils Long Term Plan 2021-2031 and that these costs will be reflected in the draft Annual Plan 2022/23 and the Long-Term Plan Amendment being developed. 

(d)     Notes that Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency have signalled intention to lead the delivery of the pre-implementation and implementation/construction phases as presented in the Enabling Works business case and that discussions to confirm how this occurs is progressing between Council and Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency.

(e)     Notes that endorsement of the Enabling Works business case does not commit TCC / Waka Kotahi to implementation, a further decision-making gate will occur when construction tender costs are available. This decision gate will be after Waka Kotahi Board decisions on the Tauriko Network Connections Long-Term Business Case including planned timing and staging of those works such as a complimentary public transport package.

(f)      Strongly encourages Waka Kotahi to bring forward and deliver the:

(i)      Public Transport package alongside the Enabling Works; and

(ii)     Full State Highway 29 long term works package with construction commencing by 2025.

(g)     Retains Attachment 3 in confidential to protect Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage commercial negotiations.

Carried

Attachments

1        Tauriko West enabling works presentation

 

12          Discussion of Late Items

As part of business.

13          Public excluded session

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

Resolution  CO4/22/14

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

(a)       That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, with the exception of Mary Hill, Cooney Lees Morgan, to be present for Item 13.3, Litigation Report.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

13.1 - Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 8 February 2022

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.2 - Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 6 December 2021

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.3 - Litigation Report

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.4 - Commercial Land Assessable for Rates

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.5 - Addressing vessels at risk on Bridge Wharf

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

L.6 - TCC's Infrastructure Funding and Financing proposals - TSP and Tauriko West

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

Confidential Attachment 3 - 11.5 - Tauriko West - Enabling Works Business Case

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

Carried

14          Closing Karakia

Commissioner Rolleston closed the meeting with a karakia.

The meeting closed at 4.55pm.

The minutes of this meeting were confirmed as a true and correct record at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 27 June 2022.

........................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

7.2         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 March 2022

File Number:           A13591732

Author:                    Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

Authoriser:             Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 March 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.       Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 March 2022 

  


UNCONFIRMEDOrdinary Council meeting Minutes

24 March 2022

 

 

 

MINUTES

Ordinary Council meeting

Thursday, 24 March 2022

 


Order of Business

1          Opening karakia. 3

2          Apologies. 4

3          Public forum.. 4

4          Acceptance of late items. 4

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 4

6          Change to the order of business. 4

7          Confirmation of minutes. 4

7.1            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 8 February 2022. 4

7.2            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 21 February 2022. 4

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest 4

9          Deputations, presentations, petitions. 4

Nil

10       Recommendations from other committees. 5

Nil

11       Business. 5

11.1          Adoption of consultation document and supporting material - Long-term Plan Amendment and Annual Plan 2022/23. 5

11.2          Adoption of the Draft 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy. 6

11.3          Active Reserves - actions to increase capacity. 7

11.4          Blake Park and Gordon Spratt Reserve & Alice Johnson Oval - actions following 'future state' user workshops. 8

11.5          Traffic & Parking Bylaw 2012 - Amendment 35. 9

12       Discussion of late items. 9

13       Public excluded session. 9

13.1          Public Excluded minutes of the Council meeting held on 21 February 2022. 10

13.2          Te Maunga Pond 1 Desludging. 10

13.3          Sale of Elder Housing. 10

13.4          The Sale of Pitau Road and Hinau Street Elder Housing Villages. 10

13.5          19 Grove Avenue, Mount Maunganui 11

11.3          Confidential Attachment 2 - Active Reserves - actions to increase capacity. 10

14       Closing karakia. 11

 


MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Ordinary Council meeting

HELD AT THE Ground Floor - Meeting Room 1, 306 Cameron Road, Tauranga

ON Thursday, 24 March 2022 AT 10am

 

 

PRESENT:                 Commission Chair Anne Tolley, Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston, Commissioner Stephen Selwood, Commissioner Bill Wasley

IN ATTENDANCE:    Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Tony Aitken (Acting General Manager: People & Engagement), Paul Davidson (General Manager: Corporate Services), Barbara Dempsey (General Manager: Community Services), Nic Johansson (General Manager: Infrastructure), Christine Jones (General Manager: Strategy & Growth), Gareth Wallis (General Manager: Central City Development), Steve Pearce (Acting General Manager: Regulatory and Compliance), Brendan Bisley (Director of Transport), Josh Logan (Team Leader: Corporate Planning), Kathryn Sharplin (Manager: Finance), Tracey Hughes (Financial Insights and Reporting Manager), Frazer Smith (Manager: Strategic Finance & Growth), Ana Blackwood (Development Contributions Policy Analyst), Ben Corbett (Team Leader: Growth Funding), Paul Dunphy (Director of Places & Spaces), Ross Hudson (Team Leader: Planning), Warren Aitken (Manager: Parks & Recreation), Ceilidh Dunphy (Community Relations Manager), Libby Dodds (Team Leader: Community Relations), Robyn Garrett (Team Leader: Committee Support), Sarah Drummond (Committee Advisor), Anahera Dinsdale (Committee Advisor)

                                    Clarence Susan and Anton Labuschagne, Audit NZ

 

1            Opening karakia

Commissioner Rolleston opened the meeting with a karakia.

 

Staff Presentation – Warren Aitken – 25 years' service

·         Warren Aitken joined TCC in 1997 as a Park Ranger at McLaren Falls and contributed much to the development of the Falls Park, particularly with significant improvements to the park’s roading and plantings.  Reputed to have piped in the New Year at the Park a number of times.

·         Moved into the Parks team with a variety of responsibilities over the years, including leading the Park Ranger team which looked after all our green spaces and wahi tapu, including Mauao, Moturiki, Kopurererua Valley and McLaren Falls.  

·         Noted his thoughtful and accommodating approach; genuinely wants to improve the environment and the city’s green spaces. An acknowledged expert in all thing’s relating to Tauranga’s natural environment.

·         Chair Tolley thanked Warren on behalf of the Council and the community for 25 years of outstanding service.

·         Warren – responded that he had been working for TCC for more than half his life and had thoroughly enjoyed working for TCC. He was proud of the Parks team and its achievements, and particularly proud of setting up the programme of removal of coastal encroachments and restoration of special ecological areas.

 

 

2            Apologies

Nil

3            Public forum

Nil

4            Acceptance of late items

Nil

5            Confidential business to be transferred into the open

Nil

6            Change to the order of business

Nil

7            Confirmation of minutes

7.1         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 8 February 2022

Resolution  CO5/22/1

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the minutes of the Council meeting held on 8 February 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

7.2         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 21 February 2022

Resolution  CO5/22/2

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the minutes of the Council meeting held on 21 February 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

8            Declaration of conflicts of interest

Nil

9            Deputations, presentations, petitions

Nil

10          Recommendations from other committees

Nil

11          Business

11.1       Adoption of consultation document and supporting material - Long-term Plan Amendment and Annual Plan 2022/23

Staff          Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

 

External    Clarence Susan and Anton Labuschagne, Audit NZ

 

Key points

·         The civic precinct project and Infrastructure Funding and Financing (IFF) proposal were key features of the Long-term Plan Amendment (LTPA). Noted the impact of IFF funding on the balance sheet and rephasing of the delivery of the capital programme.

·         Annual Plan (AP) proposed to increase the rating  contribution by the commercial sector over the next two years.

 

Audit NZ

·         Audit opinion covered the LTPA not the AP.  The emphasis of matters noted two issues – uncertainty around grants funding and the impacts of IFF funding on the balance sheet.

·         Audit had reviewed and tested the underlying information, including assumptions related to external funding; development of an LTPA was a complex and difficult process successfully managed in this case.  Thanked the council finance staff for their work.

·         Considered the Consultation Document was clear around the impacts of receiving/not receiving grant funding for the civic precinct redevelopment.

·         Intention of IFF was to remove the debt from Council’s balance sheet – the assumption was reasonable but more information available would become available as the IFF process continued and the accounting treatment of each project could be confirmed.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Was an important document with exciting opportunities for the city; there was a choice for Tauranga residents about creating a vibrant exciting central city or a scaled down version.  Would generate discussion about what should be at the heart of the city.

·         Residents felt they were carrying too bigger a load in terms of share of rates.  The commercial sector had responded constructively and the Annual Plan included a significant change to how transport rates were funded, based on an investigation about who benefitted from the transport infrastructure, which increased the percentage of transport rates that commercial would pay.

·         A lift in development contributions was proposed to account for a share of the development of community facilities.

·         Considered alternative methods of funding and financing; borrowing money where the debt does not show on Council’s books.

·         Future councils would have more flexibility about decisions made with the alternative funding arrangements that were now possible with IFF. 

·         Noted the percentage proportions of where rates would sit with commercial and residential ratepayers. Noted the increases for the commercial sector and the impact on the business sector; business community was supportive of the city moving forward and development taking place.

·         Property valuation increases also impacted on rates increases.  A third of central CBD businesses would have no or very low rates increases as commercial CBD property values had not increased significantly.

·         Without rates increases, residents would pay in other ways through a loss of services and amenity in the city.

·         Expectation of timely and efficient delivery of services by the organisation, particularly as fees and charges increase.

·         Civic redevelopment as the heart of the city, working in partnership with iwi and hapū partners.

·         The LTPA sought an additional $221m for the civic centre development from what was originally committed in the LTP.  Council was also looking at grant funding and funding from asset sales to minimise the increased cost for ratepayers.

 

Resolution  CO5/22/3

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report.

(b)     Approves the consultation document for the proposed amendment to the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and draft Annual Plan 2022/23 (Attachment 1).

(c)     Adopts the proposed amendment to the Long-term Plan 2021-2031(Attachment 2) to be consulted on through the Long-term Plan Amendment consultation document.

(d)     Adopts the draft Annual Plan 2022/23 supporting financial information (Attachment 3).

(e)     Adopts the proposed amendments to the fees and charges schedule and the Statement of Proposal for the draft 2022/23 user fees and charges as the basis for public consultation (Attachments 4 and 5).

Carried

 

Audit NZ spoke to their audit report and the remaining recommendations were put to the vote.

Resolution  CO5/22/4

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(f)      Receives the audit opinion on the consultation document for the proposed Long-term Plan Amendment, pursuant to s93D (4) of the Local Government Act 2002.

(g)     Adopts the audited consultation document for public consultation for the proposed Long-term Plan Amendment, using the special consultative procedure pursuant to s93 and s93A of the Local Government Act 2002.

(h)     Authorises the Chief Executive to make minor amendments to the documentation to ensure accuracy and correct minor drafting errors.

Carried

 

11.2       Adoption of the Draft 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy

Staff          Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

                  Ana Blackwood, Development Contributions Policy Analyst

Ben Corbett, Team Leader: Growth Funding

 

Key points

·         Direction given previously on development contributions had been incorporated into the policy.

·         There had been engagement with the development and construction sectors.

 

In response to questions

·         Consultation had included use of two council newsletters – planning and environmental – that went out to a large number of participants in the sector; had been specific contact with the bigger developers and with the larger building sector.  Staff were trying to reach out to building companies so they were aware the increase was coming.  Had used social media to try and alert “mum and dad” developers and builders, and linked  to the TCC website.  Once the policy was adopted there would be a formal consultation process. 

·         The active reserves policy would be reviewed this year, which would also include looking at the development contributions side to assess suitability.  50% of active reserves could be funded by development contributions. 

·         The difference between financial contributions and development contributions was clarified, in relation to Papamoa reserves.

·         Development contributions were based on cost estimates and the portion of services/benefit provided that related to growth; it was better to wait to collect until the project costings were well-defined for some projects.  The Memorial Park aquatic/recreation centre costs were currently being peer reviewed, materials cost could change over the years.  Noted that project delay was a risk in terms of collection of development contributions; this risk was managed by collecting at a rate slightly lower than actual costs then adjusting upwards as a project progressed.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Communication was very important for a no surprises approach for developers and home buyers.

 

Resolution  CO5/22/5

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Adopts the Statement of Proposal and Draft 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy for public consultation

(b)     Authorises the Chief Executive to approve minor draft, financial and presentation amendments to the Draft 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy prior to printing if necessary.

Carried

 

11.3       Active Reserves - actions to increase capacity

Staff          Paul Dunphy, Director, Places and Spaces

                  Ross Hudson, Team Leader: Planning

 

Key points

·         Noted that it was hard to get a clear picture of the city’s active needs now and in the future and suggested a workshop would be helpful to gain a more overall picture and context.

 

In response to questions

·         It was a very complex picture.  Noted the LTP submissions from various sports clubs about lack of investment and planning.  There was a lot of information in the reports to digest; suggested that the relevant information could have been pulled out of the appendices and presented in a more open direct way.

·         Specific parts of the reports could be progressed separately while other recommendations could be reconsidered after the workshop.  A further report could be brought back in six weeks with a wider perspective; and a workshop set up to look at wider and future active needs. 

·         Users at Gordon Spratt Reserve were very keen to see works progress.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Consideration should include areas in the wider Bay of Plenty rather than stopping at TCC boundaries;  look at the possibility of sub-regional development.

·         Need a blueprint for the city and a strategic overview of sub-regional opportunities; a strategic view was required to be able to make informed individual decisions on individual projects.

·         Need to look at from a user perspective as well.

·         Noted that council was currently backfilling from lack of investment decisions and development over years; but adequate provision for increased population and their recreational and sporting needs also needed to be made.

·         Recommendations should clearly outline options and decisions required rather than refer to appendices.

 

Resolution  CO5/22/6

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(c)     Endorses upgrades to Links Avenue Reserve and Macville Park in Mount Maunganui, to enable the development of a centralised facility for football talent development and a football academy for the city, pending agreements with the football clubs and agreement of budget reallocations through the Annual Plan Deliberations process.

Carried

Resolution  CO5/22/7

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

d)      Endorses the provision of artificial turfs as a sustainable and efficient method to meet local community demand for sports fields, in appropriate circumstances, and notes the need to amend the Active Reserve Level of Service Policy in due course to accommodate this.

Carried

 

11.4       Blake Park and Gordon Spratt Reserve & Alice Johnson Oval - actions following 'future state' user workshops

Staff          Paul Dunphy, Director, Places and Spaces

                  Ross Hudson, Team Leader: Planning

 

In response to questions

·         Clarification was provided around a multi-use pavilion at Alice Johnson Oval and available funding.

·         Provision of cricket nets in Waipuna Park had been recommended as part of the LTP – wider engagement with Welcome Bay residents around reserves and recreational needs was now completed and findings would be provided to the commissioners.

Resolution  CO5/22/8

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Thanks the users of Blake Park and Gordon Spratt Reserve and Alice Johnson Oval for their open-minded engagement in the Future State workshops, and recognises the support of Sport Bay of Plenty in facilitating these sessions in the second half of 2021.

 

(c)     Notes the opportunity for accelerated delivery of a new cricket pavilion at the Alice Johnson Oval, with budget reallocations to be considered through the 2022/23 Annual Plan Deliberations process.

(d)     Notes the opportunity for early implementation of lighting projects to increase availability of sports fields, with budget reallocations to be considered through the 2022/23 Annual Plan Deliberations process .

(f)      Completes the business case for a multi-purpose clubroom facilities, and requests that staff report to Council with indicatively priced proposals for key actions in 2022.

Carried

 

11.5       Traffic & Parking Bylaw 2012 - Amendment 35

Staff          Brendan Bisley, Director of Transport

 

Key points

·         The bylaw changes were associated with the new Papamoa school; around parking to achieve a safe environment particularly for drop-offs and pick-ups.

·         There was no on-street parking as the corridor too narrow.

Resolution  CO5/22/9

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2012 Amendments Report.

(b)     Adopts the proposed amendments to the Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2012 Attachment as per Appendix B, effective from 25 March 2022.

Carried

 

12          Discussion of late items

Nil

13          Public excluded session

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

 

Resolution  CO5/22/10

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting, with the exception of Simon Waalkens and Charlotta Harpur from Rice Speir for Agenda Item 13.5, 19 Grove Avenue.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

11.3  - Confidential Attachment 2 - Active Reserves - actions to increase capacity

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.1 - Public Excluded minutes of the Council meeting held on 21 February 2022

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.2 - Te Maunga Pond 1 Desludging

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.3 - Sale of Elder Housing

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.4 - The Sale of Pitau Road and Hinau Street Elder Housing Villages

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.5 - 19 Grove Avenue, Mount Maunganui

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

 

Carried

 

14          Closing karakia

Commissioner Rolleston closed the meeting with a karakia.

The recent passing of Sir Wira Gardiner was acknowledged and his contributions both at a Māori/Crown perspective and on a local level were noted.

The passing of Oscar Nathan’s mother Puawaitanga Nathan-Parra was also acknowledged.

 

The meeting closed at 12.05pm.

 

The minutes of this meeting were confirmed as a true and correct record at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 27 June 2022.

 

 

 

........................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

7.3         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 23 May 2022

File Number:           A13589034

Author:                    Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

Authoriser:             Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Council meeting held on 23 May 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.       Minutes of the Council meeting held on 23 May 2022 

  


UNCONFIRMEDOrdinary Council meeting minutes

23 May 2022

 

 

 

MINUTES

Ordinary Council meeting

Monday, 23 May 2022

 


Order of Business

1          Opening karakia. 3

2          Apologies. 3

3          Public forum.. 3

3.1            Mr Matt Nicholson - Links Ave. 3

4          Acceptance of late items. 4

4.1            Acceptance of late item - Baypark, Blake Park, Tauranga Domain - Masterplans and Indicative Actions. 4

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 4

6          Change to the order of business. 5

7          Confirmation of minutes. 5

7.1            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 2 May 2022. 5

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest 5

9          Deputations, presentations, petitions. 5

9.1            Kingswood Road petition Carolyn Lee and Peter Ross. 5

10       Recommendations from other committees. 6

Nil

11       Business. 6

11.1          Community Stadium - feasibility study and next steps. 6

11.8          Baypark, Blake Park, Tauranga Domain - Masterplans and Indicative Actions. 8

11.2          Three Waters Reform.. 9

11.3          Executive Report 11

11.4          Growth & Land Use Projects Progress Report - May 2022. 12

11.5          Transport Strategy and Planning Progress Report - May 2022. 13

11.6          Traffic & Parking Bylaw (2012) Amendment 37. 14

11.7          Long-term Plan 2021 - Actions Report 15

12       Discussion of late items. 15

13       Public excluded session. 15

13.1          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 2 May 2022. 15

13.2          Exemption to Open Competition - Demolition of Vessels, Chatham Explorer and Loyal 16

13.3          Exemption from Open Competition for the Relocation of the Central City Bus Interchange  16

13.4          Interim Litigation Report 16

14       Closing karakia. 16

 


MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Ordinary Council meeting

HELD AT THE Bay of Plenty Regional Council Chambers, Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga

ON Monday, 23 May 2022 AT 9.30am

 

 

PRESENT:                 Commission Chair Anne Tolley, Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston, Commissioner Stephen Selwood, Commissioner Bill Wasley

IN ATTENDANCE:    Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Tony Aitken (Acting General Manager: People & Engagement), Paul Davidson (General Manager: Corporate Services), Barbara Dempsey (Acting General Manager: Community Services), Nic Johansson (General Manager: Infrastructure), Christine Jones (General Manager: Strategy & Growth), Gareth Wallis (General Manager: Central City Development), Paul Dunphy (Director of Spaces and Places), Dianne Bussey (Contractor – Three Water Reforms), Cathy Davidson (Manager: Directorate Services), Stephen Burton (Director of City Waters), Carlo Ellis (Manager: Strategic Māori Engagement), Andy Mead (Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning), Will Hyde, (Senior Transportation Engineer), Alister Talbot (Team Leader, Transport Strategy and Planning), Josh Logan (Team Leader: Corporate Planning), Coral Hair (Manager: Democracy Services), Robyn Garrett (Team Leader: Committee Support), Sarah Drummond (Committee Advisor), Anahera Dinsdale (Committee Advisor), Janie Storey (Committee Advisor)

 

1            Opening karakia

Commissioner Rolleston opened the meeting with a karakia.

2            Apologies

Nil

3            Public forum

3.1         Mr Matt Nicholson - Links Ave

Key Points

·         Considered the first road closure trialled to help safety of children at local schools was not fit for purpose and while it may have achieved some of its outcomes it did not meet them all.

·         Second trial was confusing, the signage inadequate and was not well publicised.  8,500 road users were fined and many more warned, which resulted in making people feel like criminals.

·         There was minimal consultation with those affected; Links Ave users were isolated from families and friends and did not feel heard by the Council.

·         One resident was denied a waiver three times to exit her own street.

·         Fines were imposed at a time of unaffordability with high inflation and increasing costs and people should not have to choose between paying fines and buying food.

·         Residents felt their concerns remained unheard and unconsidered.

·         All fines should be refunded.

·         Safety was not just a Links Ave issue, it affected a wider area.  The street’s capacity for pedestrian traffic was not suitable and there were a number of children now walking on the street. 

·         Narrow footpaths for kids walking and biking; there was a flow on effect onto Golf Road which had resulted in a safety issue for children.

·         The road was used by 7500 motorists a day, traffic had to go somewhere and had been pushed onto the already congested surrounding streets.

·         If the trial was there to protect children why was it operating at times when there were not children going to or from school.

·         Mr Nicholson tabled the petition.

 

At 9.41am the meeting adjourned.

 

At 10.12am the meeting reconvened.

 

In response to questions

·         Two issues on the table - the first being remissions of fines on which staff would provide a report to the 13 June 2022 Council meeting.  Second issue was the ongoing issues around the trial which was currently at the mid-point of a four-month trial. Council would come back to community with an update following the trial.

·         A group of people, including those with an interest in or affected by Links Avenue, would come together to find what a solution might look like for residents and the wider community.  This was still being worked on and would also be discussed at the 13 June 2022 Council meeting.

·         The trial would continue as a change of behaviours was starting to be seen.

·         If petitioners wished to speak in the public forum at the Council meeting they must follow the process and register. To avoid duplication, a decision would then be made as to who would speak.

·         Thanks to all for attending the meeting as Councillors had been struggling for two terms to deal with the issue. 

·         It must now be dealt with as it was a safety issue for children going to and from school and no one wanted to see a child hurt.

·         Council understood the disruption to lives but asked everyone to follow the rules while a sensible solution was found.

Attachments

1        Links Ave petition

 

4            Acceptance of late items

4.1         Acceptance of late item - Baypark, Blake Park, Tauranga Domain - Masterplans and Indicative Actions

Resolution  CO9/22/1

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Baypark, Blake Park, Tauranga Domain - Masterplans and Indicative Actions late item be accepted.

Carried

 

5            Confidential business to be transferred into the open

Nil

6            Change to the order of business

Nil

7            Confirmation of minutes

7.1         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 2 May 2022

Resolution  CO9/22/2

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the minutes of the Council meeting held on 2 May 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

8            Declaration of conflicts of interest

Nil

9            Deputations, presentations, petitions

9.1         Kingswood Road petition Carolyn Lee and Peter Ross

Key Points

·         Concerned with behaviour of drivers in the street and seeking Council to provide a safer environment within the area.

·         Burnouts happened quite often; cars had also lost control and damanged fences etc with instances of dangerous driving and speeding becoming more frequent.

·         Neighbourhood included many young families so there was a big concern for the safety of children.

·         Many motorists entering Kingswood Road tended to accelerate and often reached speeds of 80km.

·         Petitioner had seen four accidents caused due to speed.

·         There was nowhere to safely cross the road for familes and people coming from the Clifton Terrace reserve because of the excessive speed of some vehicles.

·         Petition with 105 signatures showed the concern expressed by residents.

·         Volunteers were prepared to install speed humps themselves if needed.

·         Suggested that traffic islands be installed as pedestrian refuges for people crossing the road or speed humps similar to Sutherland Road to slow the traffic.

·         Kingswood Ave was a cul-de-sac not a thoroughfare.

 

In response to questions

·         Currently there were no pedestrian crossings on the section of road.

·         Traffic going over speed humps could be quite noisy.

·         Drivers try to make the street as straight as possible by cutting corners, with the Woodford Road and Clifton Terrace intersections being danger zones.

·         Danger to motorists coming out of side roads with traffic travelling so fast.

 

Discussion points raised

·         It was noted that there was funding included in the Annual Budget (being decided on 24 May 2022) to implement safety improvement works in Kingswood Rd.

Resolution  CO9/22/3

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council receives the Kingswood Road petition.

Carried

 

10          Recommendations from other committees

Nil

11          Business

11.1       Community Stadium - feasibility study and next steps

Staff          Gareth Wallis, General Manager: Central City Development

 

External    Dean Kimpton, Nigel Tutt and Hugh Hutchison from Priority 1

 

Key points

·         Partnership approach, while the project was on Council land, TCC would be a partner but not run the process; other organisations involved included Sport BOP, BOPRC.

·         Not just a sports stadium – it would have other uses including cultural events and concerts.

·         Feasibility study only at this stage and was not a finished product - there was much work still to be done.

·         Believed stadium was feasible and strongly recommended to proceed to the next stage of detailed design work.

·         Noted key requirements to enable constant community use of domain - it would work equally well for all users, maximise revenue generation, complement wider network and CBD precinct, carve a unique niche for city and be world leading in its approach.

·         Recommended location Wharepai Domain, seen as ideal location for what was trying to achieve.

·         Sight line between the Domain and Mauao a key consideration, particularly for stunning views for on-air broadcasting.

·         Had considered geotechnical issues along the boundary with the highway; also the interaction with tree lines and residential areas.

·         A three sided stadium would retain the Mauao sightline and be protected from prevailing conditions rather than making it a four sided or covered stadium.

·         Could unlock the potential of the whole domain  when needed - e.g. tent sites, stages etc.

·         Capacity of 8,000 permanent seating, this could be scaled up to 18,000; or up to 40,000 upper limit if in full event mode.

·         Recommend Open-air boutique “people stadium”, three sided with ability to put full sided.

·         Outlined next steps aimed at opening the stadium in 2026.

·         Processes to be followed were outlined including a Charitable Trust being explored to run the stadium.

 

In response to questions

·         Would need to reconsider timing for consultation to be held with the community in terms of the next LTP; the initial consultation was factored into the timeline and again as part of consenting, with a budget allocated for that consultation.

 

·         The closest example for uniqueness of the project was the Central Coast Stadium but no real benchmark in NZ, there were a couple in Australia and Europe. 

·         Research on crowd numbers was factored into design – three-sided design would allow a ‘closed-in’ feel and enhanced viewer experience.

·         Project would have a significant number of gateways - the next being the business case where further analysis would indicate whether it needed to be included in an LTPA next year or LTP in 2024.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Project has had a long gestation and was included in the Te Papa Spatial Plan as a possibility.

·         Boutique, multi-functional arena, with good connections to the CBD that would not be just a sports stadium.

·         Covered stadium on this site ruled out as it would not be suitable .

·         Need to consider how the exhibition space interacted with the development of the civic centre.

·         Bay Oval was an example of an orphaned trust - if the trust ran out of money and the project could not be completed, it would fall back on the Council.  Need to think carefully about the establishment of a trust, its function and purpose, the ongoing management, ownership and the financial oversights that needed to be in place.

·         A master planning process was underway for other key reserves/sportsfields e.g. Baypark, Bay Oval.  The timing was critical to provide a holistic and helicopter view of key facilities throughout the city to ensure they worked well.

·         Need to give consideration to the connection of the Domain area to the CBD and whether there was a need to look at the northern end of Cameron Rd to achieve connection to the area in more comprehensive manner.

·         Synergy between the development of the stadium, the civic centre redevelopment and the private investment planned as outlined by Priority 1 Blueprint report released recently.

·         Need to get it right, know the event and exhibition markets, make sure all facilities worked together and did not compete with each other.

·         Need to give considerable thought to the appropriate management and governance arrangements/operating model for the Stadium, including being appropriately resourced.

Resolution  CO9/22/4

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Tauranga Multi-Function Stadium Feasibility Study (Attachment 1) and appendices (Attachment 2).

(b)     Agrees in principle that the Tauranga Domain is a suitable site for a community stadium.

(c)     Approves Council’s participation in the project’s next steps, including development of the business case and further design work.

(d)     Continues to engage directly with mana whenua and affected parties, including existing users of the Tauranga Domain, and with wider stakeholders as appropriate.

Carried

 

Change to the order of business

Resolution  CO9/22/5

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Amends the order of business so the next item of business is 11.8, the late item Baypark, Blake Park, Tauranga Domain - Masterplans and Indicative Actions.

Carried

 

11.8       Baypark, Blake Park, Tauranga Domain - Masterplans and Indicative Actions

 

Staff          Barbara Dempsey; General Manager: Community Services

Paul Dunphy; Director of Places and Spaces

 

Key points

·         Looking at understanding what TCC needed from an active reserve planning perspective and maximise what already had.

·         Report outlined overall suggestions but there needed to be a lot of engagement with key parties such as netball and speedway.

 

In response to questions

·         Commissioners expected a further report back by late August/early September 2022.

·         Would do a network approach and next tier down (Tier 2) active reserves e.g. Gordon Spratt Reserve.

·         Report would include what city had today and where it needed to be in the next 10 years for both Tiers 1 and 2.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Opportunities offered by change would unfold as engagement with key stakeholders/users took place.

·         Fundamental to involve Bay Venues Limited.

Resolution  CO9/22/6

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Undertakes masterplans for Baypark, Blake Park, and the Tauranga and Wharepai Domains, with Bay Venues Limited and other key stakeholders, to be reported back by early September 2022; and

Pending finalisation of those masterplans;

(b)     Identifies Baypark as the preferred location for a new Tauranga netball facility, consults and works with the Netball Association towards that objective;

(c)     Works with Bay Venues Limited to explore options for the relocation of the Tauranga Domain athletics track and in doing so, consults with the Bay of Plenty Speedway Association about co-location and relocation options for a facility, subject to the community stadium development proceeding;

(d)     Works with Tauranga lawn bowls and croquet to explore co-location and relocation options, subject to the community stadium development proceeding; and

(e)     Continues to engage directly with affected parties, including existing users of the reserves, and with mana whenua and wider stakeholders as appropriate.

Carried

 

Attachments

1        Presentation - Community Stadium Feasibility Presentation Overview

 

11.2       Three Waters Reform

Staff          Nic Johansson; General Manager: Infrastructure

Stephen Burton; Director of City Waters

Carlo Ellis; Manager: Strategic Māori Engagement

Cathy Davidson, Manager: Directorate Services

 

Key points

·         Attempted to distil the key issues; National Working Group’s recommendations around responsibility, governance and accountability.

·         Took the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) some time to respond to the ten concerns raised by TCC; response was largely how they would take into account those concerns in the process.

·         Two tier governance model – still a lot of detail needed to be worked through around the regional representative group and how that would be set up; operational board appointed by the regional representative group. 

·         Two main areas of work – reform and transition. TCC had input into the reform process as much as the government allowed; transition area provided more ability to get alongside in the transition work to represent the community, meet legislation and be fully operational to move into a large entity.

·         Summarised nine areas of key concern grouped into reform and transition categories.  Majority of reform issues were still of significant concern and legislation needed to be sighted before it could be taken to the community.

·         Only privatisation exclusion had been addressed effectively – high bar including a 75% majority of MPs.

·         TCC staff were included on the national working groups that were working with the government.

·         Te Rangapū were meeting on 25 May 2022 to work through the recommendations; very principle focussed. 

·         Noted significant issues for Te Rangapū - Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Te Mana o te Wai, natural Māori alliances, discharge to whenua, protect kaitiakitanga, utilisation of Māori land and natural form and function of taiao.

·         Next steps included various pieces of legislation being developed; anticipated that the Water Services Bill would be available next month.

·         Funding arrangements to support transitional activities were still an issue.

·         A number of issues were still to be resolved regarding the interface between the governance and regulatory requirements.

·         Discovery requests were still coming from the National Transition Unit (NTU) that required substantial information responses.

 

In response to questions

·         NTU working on response to funding issues around transition costs; working with other local councils to see where costs could be shared and do things together to save costs.

·         Recognition of value of the assets built up over generations and queried how the shareholding was calculated and what its purpose was - shareholding based on population rather than value of the assets of the individual councils – seemed to do a disservice to TCC ratepayers when the city’s water infrastructure was recognised as being in the top four in the country.

·         Concern that there was no place for ratepayers to have a say other than through the submission process to parliament.   Still a misunderstanding in the community that the reforms were a local government issue rather than being put upon them by central government.

·         TCC’s submission to the legislation would be made available to the public for consideration and contribution.  Iwi supported this approach - a lot could be done whether reforms go ahead or not and it offered respect to community.

·         Would identify issues within the community and how to address these where possible regardless of the outcome of the reform.

·         Stormwater reference group had been reconvened; delineation needed as to who had responsibility and where; principles need to be refined.  There was a stormwater technical team with one staff member on it in the transition unit; had not seen anything out of that working group yet. 

·         Consent arrangements e.g. Waiāri – it was unclear how these monitoring groups would transition over and where the relationship would sit, with the entity or the local authority/community. Unknown at this stage but was a current workstream. Important that these relationships be recognised as permanent and given certainty.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Considerable feeling in the community about the reforms.  Noted that the organisation had to prudently prepare for the transition process; the cost and uncertainty for staff and the organisation which was separate from any political considerations about the reform itself.

·         Serious concerns about how the shareholding of councils was calculated and the limitations of it being based on a population model, without consideration of asset value. Significant reservations around the governance structure proposed and the means to bring iwi to the table as they needed to be represented.

·         Government had not clearly explained the benefits/outcomes of the reform process to the community - a strong representation to government to be clear was needed.

·         Was a complex issue that would not suit an “agree or not” referendum approach.

·         Stormwater management was integral to placemaking in the city, including its contribution to all amenities e.g. reserves used as cycleways.  Need to be able to use critical elements of stormwater management in placemaking as they had amenity value. 

·         Needs to be clarity with the relationship between water entity and the local authority around this issue.

·         There was an ongoing lack of clarity around how the puzzle pieces fitted together and who would have the responsibilities and roles. Expect a lengthy transition period to have these matters sorted out.

·         All water was a resource regardless of the type or source of that water – need to think about the value of the resource, in terms of what it provides for the environment, the people and what was gained from it.  Priority use seemed to have been commercial value and economic development then municipal supply then the environment itself – considered this was wrong prioritising and should be flipped.

·         Costs would fall on ratepayers so need to do the very best for the community.

·         Noted the Commissioners recognised the pressure the reforms were putting on staff.

Resolution  CO9/22/7

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report Three Waters Reforms Programme – Impact Assessment on Working Group Recommendations.

(b)     Notes the approach to consider information based on two categories; (1) Reforms, (2) Transition.

(c)     Notes the summarised updates for the ten key concern categories.

(d)     Notes the revised impact assessment by staff on the concerns raised by community, Te Rangapū and commission.

(e)     Notes that a verbal update will be provided by Te Rangapū representative, post discussions on 19 May 2022.

(f)      Notes and confirms that staff continue to work with NTU at a national level and a local level with the establishment of an Entity B Local Transition Team to strengthen TCC’s readiness to successfully move three waters operations and services into the proposed future arrangement.

(g)     Notes the continuation to develop funding requirements for ongoing TCC participation to support funding application/allocation to enable backfilling instances where TCC staff provide input into transition activities.

(h)     Notes the continuation to meet discovery request requirements and support requirements as advised by NTU.

(i)      Requests that TCC’s submission to the reform legislation be made available to the community for consideration and discussion.

Carried

Attachments

1        Presentation - 3 Waters Reform

 

11.3       Executive Report

Staff          Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure Services

Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

Tony Aitken, Acting General Manager: People and Engagement

Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Community Services

 

Key points

·         Item 10 - The cost for the section of Opal Drive pipeline currently being renewed was $7m.

·         Noted the success of the heritage collection tours and launch of He Puna Manawa and positive comments being received by staff.  Noted success of the interactive Echoes exhibition.

·         Removal of exotic trees from Mauao – only one helicopter that can do the work, need to manage in terms of timing with Matariki.

·         Business sector and feedthrough airport travel bookings into international sectors continued to increase.

·         Objections to property revaluations were being worked through, as were the individual rating arrangements.

·         Draft National Adaptation Plan had been released, timeframes would require retrospective endorsement by Council so staff would work with Commissioners as the response was being developed.

·         Additional resourcing was being recruited for Takawaenga, partially to support tangata whenua committee appointees and building capacity to work with tangata whenua.

·         The Pecuniary Interests Bill was currently only for elected members and excluded appointed members.  Commissioners to hold discussion around whether they should be included and require the date of effect and reporting requirements.

·         A number of community stakeholder events had been held by regulation teams – e.g. liquor licensing, changes to the Building Act.

·         Teams had worked very hard to get building consent applications allocated and down to a manageable level by using contractors for some applications.

 

In response to questions

·         Totara Street improvements – maintenance included in asset management plans and would be maintained at a suitable level once the work had been done.  Need to stipulate an appropriate level of service for each development, balancing the level of aesthetics with cost. 

·         Electric rubbish trucks were substantially heavier than non-electric trucks, but as they were used in a street only once a week there was less pressure impact on the roading network.

·         Three spaces would be made immediately available to the Kulim Park Sculpture Trust.

·         Disability access and inclusion would be provided in the next report.

·         Comparison requested between visitor numbers to the old library and He Puna Manawa.

·         Staff were currently looking at planning, design and delivery at the right level for playgrounds/reserves.

·         CRM system was an overreaching system that picked up all relationships with a customer in one place, recording interactions, did not replace personal contact.  Was initially dealing with organisational or institutional stakeholders rather than individual ratepayers.

·         Could take up to three years for a building control officer to be fully qualified, but they could gain competency and partial qualification in 9-12 months. Need to ensure competency prior to being given responsibility as the liability falls onto the Council. 

·         Some groups of home developers were willing to share predictions around building volume; staff also worked with Master Builders and known developers to gauge building consent workloads.

·         The quality of consent applications was an issue particularly with building consent applications, which often had to go back for further information.  There were also issues with the supply of materials resulting in amendments being required.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Install project billboards with photos at work sites when a project was being undertaken to tell the residents the story of what was occurring, the reason for it, a timeline for the works and cost - e.g. Opal Drive and Totara Street improvements.

·         Acknowledgement of the collaboration between the Incubator and TCC with the development of the Historic Village.

·         Requested that the month of completion be provided when reporting on projects.

·         Noted the success of the Heritage Collection visits and the Priority 1 series of city walks currently being run. Need to expand the opportunities/initiatives to engage the community with collections and the wider history of the city.

·         Noted the economic and social benefit to the city of a one-day event, e.g. the Black Clash.

Resolution  CO9/22/8

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Executive Report.

Carried

 

At 12.35pm the meeting adjourned.

At 1.20pm the meeting reconvened.

 

11.4       Growth & Land Use Projects Progress Report - May 2022

Staff          Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy and Growth

                  Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

 

Key points

·         Report to Council as the next Strategy Finance and Risk Committee had a large agenda.

·         Challenge to deliver the city’s growth needs at the pace required; also working through SmartGrowth.

·         PC27 - two appeals had been received and a third was also expected. The resources needed to respond to the appeals would impact on other projects.

·         Working to implement decisions on the Urban Design Panel.

·         Waka Kotahi commitments made to Tauriko West business case had been included in the final round for the Infrastructure Acceleration Fund.  Problems still remained around wetlands issues and staff were waiting to see how much had been incorporated into the freshwater reforms by the government.

·         Te Tumu – working positively with the Trust; however, it was a long and challenging process with the likelihood of houses not being built until 2030. The project estimates would be revised to meet this timing.

·         Industrial Land Strategy was a big piece of work moving forward and integrated with the broader spatial planning work for Mount Maunganui.

 

In response to questions

·         Enabling works for Tauriko West urban development area – Waka Kotahi Board approval but as there was still no provision for public transport included, it did not make sense to move on the enabling works without this being addressed. 

·         The missing link was with Waka Kotahi and the state highway network for public transport and was sitting with Waka Kotahi’s long-term business case; Waka Kotahi was engaging with Priority 1, the Tauranga Crossing and other stakeholders.

·         A commitment had been received from Waka Kotahi that they would engage with Tauranga Crossing and Mr Stillwell, and that an early warning be given for the pending resource consent application.  It was critical for TCC involvement as it could hold up progression of the enabling works.

·         Risk was that TCC would be held up in delivering on the National Standard for Urban Development through lack of resourcing by Waka Kotahi. 

·         Frustration noted due to the funding restrictions and Waka Kotahi processes in TCC being able to progress delivery of housing which would affect outcomes and impact on potential house buyers.

·         There was a need to work through the issues in a much more expeditious way and to work closely with SmartGrowth who had a growth partnership agreement signed with the Crown and central government.

·         Acknowledged that government had provided a lot of money through various funding arrangements and projects, but these were not necessarily joined-up processes. 

·         Need for the SH29 and 29A public transport links to be accelerated in order to unlock the development of the Western Corridor e.g. Tauriko West and Te Tumu.

·         TCC was the only city that could not meet its obligations under the NPS for Urban Development.  May not be able to fully utilise the IFF funding unless other legislative and funding actions were taken.

·         Need for a streamlined and integrated planning approach and to work in parallel with BOPRC in terms of the development of the RPS.

Resolution  CO9/22/9

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Growth and Land Use Projects Progress Report – May 2022.

(b)     Resolves to write to relevant Ministers detailing the lack of alignment of agencies and legislation around planning and  funding urban development, seeking an urgent meeting to discuss the issues.

Carried

 

 

11.5       Transport Strategy and Planning Progress Report - May 2022

Staff          Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

                  Alister Talbot, Team Leader: Transport Strategy and Planning

 

Key points

·         Emissions Reduction Plan would have a considerable impact on a number of TCC projects.

·         TSP Partnership would need further consideration; seeking guidance from Waka Kotahi about how certain targets were applied at a project level in a growth area, as these targets needed to be understood at a practical project level.

·         Funding had been received to progress the long-term city centre bus facility to allow the business case to be completed.

 

In response to questions

·         The business case for the city centre bus facility would allow consideration of alternative layout options and locations.

·         Cameron Road Stage 2/15th Ave/Turret Rd - request to utilise ‘check in and check-up’ method as the projects moved forward to ensure appropriate discussions were held with the Commissioners throughout the development of the business cases.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Transition of people from cars to public transport would not happen as quickly as the government would like and the incentivising of electric cars would also increase vehicle numbers and movements.  There would still be congestion and queuing issues. Public policy was contradictory and not delivering the outcomes required.

·         Noted that some of the issues raised in the report be included in the meeting/discussions noted in the resolutions for Item 11.4.

·         There was a need to consider the housing developments happening further out from the city and in other parts of the region in terms of impact on the transport system.

·         The cost of housing in Tauranga was driving people further out of the city for affordable housing e.g. Matamata, but many still commuted into the city for work and school.

Resolution  CO9/22/10

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Transport Strategy and Planning Progress Report – May 2022.

Carried

 

11.6       Traffic & Parking Bylaw (2012) Amendment 37

Staff          Will Hyde, Senior Transportation Engineer

 

In response to questions

·         Girven Rd/Maranui/Ocean Beach Rd parking was a large building project with construction traffic possibly adding to the issue.

·         “No parking on berms” was a matter of safety in order to maintain sightlines for intersections. .  It was suggested staff speak to the construction company involved.

·         Once the development was completed, private parking would be provided on the site.

 

Resolution  CO9/22/11

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Traffic and Parking Bylaw (2012) Amendments Report.

 

(b)     Adopts the proposed amendments to the Traffic and Parking Bylaw (2012) Attachment as per Appendix B, relating to minor changes for general safety or amenity purposes, to become effective from 24 May 2022.

Carried

 

11.7       Long-term Plan 2021 - Actions Report

Staff          Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy and Growth

 

Key points

·         Requested overall time frame for projects including milestones and completion dates.

·         Noted that a significant number of actions were completed and an update report would be provided in three months. 

Resolution  CO9/22/12

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Long-term Plan 2021 – Actions Report.

(b)     Notes the progress to date as reported in Attachment 1.

Carried

 

12          Discussion of late items

Included in business.

13          Public excluded session

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

Resolution  CO9/22/13

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

13.1 - Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 2 May 2022

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.2 - Exemption to Open Competition - Demolition of Vessels, Chatham Explorer and Loyal

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.3 - Exemption from Open Competition for the Relocation of the Central City Bus Interchange

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.4 - Interim Litigation Report

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

 

Carried

14          Closing karakia

Commissioner Rolleston closed the meeting with a karakia.

 

The meeting closed at 2.43pm.

 

The minutes of this meeting were confirmed as a true and correct record at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 27 June 2022.

 

 

........................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

7.4         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 May 2022

File Number:           A13589037

Author:                    Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

Authoriser:             Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 May 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.       Minutes of the Council meeting held on 24 May 2022 

  


UNCONFIRMEDOrdinary Council meeting Minutes

24 May 2022

 

 

 

MINUTES

Ordinary Council meeting

Tuesday, 24 May 2022

 


Order of Business

1          Opening Karakia. 3

2          Apologies. 3

3          Public Forum.. 3

4          Acceptance of late items. 3

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 3

6          Change to the order of business. 4

7          Confirmation of Minutes. 4

7.1            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 9 and 11 May 2022. 4

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest 4

9          Deputations, Presentations, Petitions. 4

Nil

10       Recommendations from Other Committees. 4

Nil

11       Business. 4

11.1          Long-term Plan Amendment/Annual Plan 2022/23 Deliberations. 4

11.2          Long-term Plan Amendment Deliberations - Engagement Insights. 5

11.6          Tsunami Sirens. 5

11.3          Long-term Plan Amendment Deliberations - Civic Precinct Issues and Options Report 6

11.4          Transport System Plan – Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposal 8

11.5          Tauriko West – Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposal 9

11.7          Executive Report to the Annual Plan. 10

11.8          Annual Plan 2022/23 Deliberations - Issues and Options - Other feedback and suggestions. 12

11.9          Rating Policy Proposals. 18

11.10       Submissions on the 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy. 19

11.1          Long-term Plan Amendment/Annual Plan 2022/23 Deliberations continued. 20

12       Discussion of Late Items. 21

13       Public excluded session. 21

Confidential Attachment 1     11.4 - Transport System Plan – Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposal 21

14       Closing Karakia. 21

 


MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Ordinary Council meeting

HELD AT THE TAURANGA CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS, GROUND FLOOR MEETING ROOM 1 , 306 CAMERON ROAD, Tauranga

ON Tuesday, 24 May 2022 AT 9am

 

 

PRESENT:                 Commission Chair Anne Tolley, Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston, Commissioner Stephen Selwood, Commissioner Bill Wasley

IN ATTENDANCE:    Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Tony Aitken (Acting General Manager: People & Engagement), Paul Davidson (General Manager: Corporate Services), Barbara Dempsey (Acting General Manager: Community Services), Nic Johansson (General Manager: Infrastructure), Christine Jones (General Manager: Strategy & Growth), Steve Pearce (Acting General Manager: Regulatory and Compliance), Gareth Wallis (General Manager: Central City Development), Josh Logan (Team Leader: Corporate Planning), Kathryn Sharplin (Manager: Finance), Tracey Hughes (Financial Insights & Reporting Manager), Paula Naude (Manager: Emergency Management),  Ceilidh Dunphy (Community Relations Manager), Ben Corbett (Team Leader: Growth Funding), James Woodward (Delivery Manager), Malcolm Gibb (Project Manager: Rating Review), Jim Taylor (Transactional Services Manager), Ana Blackwood (Senior Advisor: Growth Funding), Sam Fellows (Manager: Sustainability and Waste), Coral Hair (Manager: Democracy Services), Robyn Garrett (Team Leader: Committee Support), Sarah Drummond (Committee Advisor), Anahera Dinsdale (Committee Advisor), Janie Storey (Committee Advisor)

Wayne Silva and Verity Judge - Willis Bond

 

 

Tuesday, 24 May 2022 at 9am

 

1            Opening Karakia

Commissioner Rolleston opened the meeting with a karakia.

2            Apologies

Nil

3            Public Forum

Nil

4            Acceptance of late items

Nil

5            Confidential business to be transferred into the open

Nil

6            Change to the order of business

Nil

7            Confirmation of Minutes

7.1         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 9 and 11 May 2022

Correction: Item 34 should read restore mauri moana

Resolution  CO10/22/1

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That, subject to the foregoing correction, the minutes of the Council meeting held on 9 and 11 May 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

.Carried

 

8            Declaration of conflicts of interest

Nil

9            Deputations, Presentations, Petitions

Nil

10          Recommendations from Other Committees

Nil

11          Business

11.1       Long-term Plan Amendment/Annual Plan 2022/23 Deliberations

Staff          Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy and Growth

Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

Josh Logan, Team Leader: Corporate Planning

Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

 

Key points

·         Outline of the processes undertaken, the decisions made, the methods of consultation and submissions received.

·         Appreciation to Commissioners for leading the process and owning the document as their own.

·         Deliberation decisions to go to Audit NZ for approval and adoption by Council on 27 June 2022.

 

In response to questions

·         There were no changes to the capital projects, however some were pushed out to be completed later than first anticipated.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Challenges included the restrictions imposed due to Covid and changes to the rating system.

·         While consultation was varied across the district, a review of what other local authorities were doing to capture community conversations would be helpful to ensure the decisions made were reasonable for a cross section of the residents.

·         Appreciation given to all involved in the process.

·         Commissioners comfortable with the process given challenges but would continue to do better.

Resolution  CO10/22/2

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)       Receives the report, Long-term Plan Amendment/Annual Plan 2022/23 Deliberations.

(b)       Leaves the balance of the recommendations listed lie on table until the end of the meeting.

Carried

 

11.2       Long-term Plan Amendment Deliberations - Engagement Insights

Staff          Ceilidh Dunphy, Community Relations Manager

 

Key points

·         Consultation challenge was to attract residents that were not normally reached.

·         Use of opportunities to get informal feedback from people where they were congregating.

·         Majority of public support was received for Option 1.

 

In response to questions

·         Appreciation for the efforts from staff to reach a cross section of people and making the process more accessible.

·         Challenge now was how to capture these conversations.

·         Staff had not been able to capture geographic areas of responders through social media, but could capture some demographic information if required.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Support for looking at other consultation mechanisms going forward e.g. different surveys for different demographics, looking at new and innovative ways to capture comments.

·         Significant numbers had taken time to comment on social media, keenness to explore survey methods to get balanced views.

·         Suggestion included having a Slido poll at public meetings with opportunities to put questions for those not wanting/able to speak at the meeting.

Resolution  CO10/22/3

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report Long-term Plan Amendment Deliberations – Engagement Insights.

Carried

 

11.6       Tsunami Sirens

Staff          Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Community Services

                  Paula Naude, Manager: Emergency Management

 

 

Key points

·         A number of examples overseas indicated Option 1 was a good national warning system.

·         Consultation supported Option 1 including the continuation of education and awareness programmes.

 

In response to questions

·         Inclusion of a prompt to check your neighbour would be formalised on the website and in written material.

·         The wider community would need ongoing campaigns to ensure residents were well aware of how to respond to message and to ensure they included the people around them.

·         A project plan would be provided to a future meeting to ensure knowledge of what was being proposed.

Resolution  CO10/22/4

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Continues investing in tsunami education, awareness and supporting community networks including targeted focus on more isolated or vulnerable members of the community.

(b)     Does not install a tsunami siren network.

Carried

 

11.3       Long-term Plan Amendment Deliberations - Civic Precinct Issues and Options Report

Staff          Gareth Wallis, General Manager: City Centre Development

 

External    Wayne Silva and Verity Judge - Willis Bond - Presentation

 

Key points

·         Consulted within LTPA on 3 options with 1181 submissions and a lot of formal and informal feedback being received.

·         Outline of process undertaken to date to proceed with consultation summary and presentations.

·         Determination of the buildings and use for each would allow greater certainty of costings and design.

·         Design consultants over all disciplines had been included as part of team.  

·         $303m did not include some elements such as the development of the water front and playground.  This had been transferred to a new programme of works for Dive Crescent and the Waterfront Reserve.

·         Precinct could be delivered within budget. 20% of the total included escalation and contingency items such as inflation and increased costs.

·         Costings were based on 5 star green rating - to move to 6 star the construction would need to be wooded, include solar panels and other green elements which would be investigated at the next design stage.

·         Decisions, including the façade, would be required for the resource consent pack (preliminary design) which was planned for November 2022.

·         Liquefaction in some locations on the site would require a 12 month settlement period prior to building.  

·         Library to be the first building commenced followed by the museum.

 

In response to questions

·         The carbon difference was 90% moving from a steel and concrete construction to wood.  It would be lighter, reduce the amount of piles needed and create opex savings with water recycling and solar generation of power.

·         It would be seen as a bold leadership stance to reach 6 star and would be leading edge and display good practice behaviours to the community.

·         Creation of more soft surfaces was needed within the walk through areas and the provision of shade and power for performers and the public in the greenspaces.

·         Funding of shortfall, including external grant funding, would continue in earnest and include recycling of assets and three waters funding.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Project delivers confidence to others to invest in the CBD and opportunities for a citywide transformation, provides a range of art and cultural amenities, connects the waterfront to the city and reflects the hopes and dreams of many in the city.

·         Acknowledgement given to all involved in the project.

A copy of the staff presentation for this item can be viewed on Tauranga City Council’s website in the Minutes Attachments document for this committee meeting.

Resolution  CO10/22/5

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report Long-term Plan Amendment Deliberations – Civic Precinct Issues and Options Report.

(b)     Approves Option 1 – Te Manawataki O Te Papa (Civic Precinct) Masterplan (Refreshed 2021) at a capital cost of $303.4 million, for inclusion in the Long-term Plan Amendment 2021-31.

(c)     Notes that whilst the total project cost was the same as the draft budget consulted on, there were a number of changes outlined in this report, including the addition of a temperature controlled archive within the library and community hub (not previously budgeted within the programme), and the removal of $8 million for a waterfront playground, which was now budgeted as part of a separate Dive Crescent and Waterfront Reserve upgrade project.

(d)     Notes the programme of works was subject to achieving 50% of the required funding from sources other than rates-funded debt, with an estimated net cost to ratepayers of $151.5 million. Each project would be subject to gateways recognised in resolution (e), prior to proceeding.

(e)     Reconfirms that the Civic Precinct project was required to have appropriate governance arrangements, business cases, funding mix, and decision gateways for each key facility. Specific consideration before gateway approval was to be given to the following matters raised by the community through the Long-term Plan Amendment submissions process:

·    Size and scale of the individual facilities.

·    Opportunities to deliver facilities which were exemplar in terms of sustainability; and

·    Less concrete and softer, greener design elements.

Carried

Attachments

1        Presentation - Civic Centre Enhanced Costings

 

At 10.47am the meeting adjourned

At 11.02am the meeting reconvened.

11.4       Transport System Plan Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposal

Staff          Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy and Growth

Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

Ben Corbett, Team Leader: Growth Funding

 

Key points

·         Infrastructure Funding and Financing (IFF) provided more flexibility, longer term financing and increased capacity into the future.

·         Waka Kotahi approved $89m funding for a package of projects with $79m approved for Tauriko.

·         Two key financial risks - $38m probable funding and $190m still to be submitted to Waka Kotahi for some projects that were not yet in place or some that may not proceed.

·         Once approved and signed off by Council the funding could only be used for projects within the pool.

·         Waka Kotahi and Council were working together with funding options and to align National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) funding with IFF funding, but were not yet in a position where certainty could be given for the entire package. 

·         Continuing to work with Waka Kotahi on the level of certainty for projects and then a decision could be made to accept/reject and proceed/not proceed.

·         Once a decision was made it would not be reversable.

 

In response to questions

·         Decisions would be made once all information and funding implications had been provided.

·         The cost to ratepayers for IFF would be lower than the a development levy cost being added to a mortgage and would free up TCC debt to borrow for other items.

·         Need to ensure ratepayers were receiving value for money and the Council was using the funding wisely.

·         TSP and IFF were innovative and Council were working with crown agencies to accept as a method to fund transport projects across the city.

Resolution  CO10/22/6

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Approves the Long-Term Plan Amendment reflecting Infrastructure Funding and Financing Levy (IFF) as a means of funding for Transport System Plan (TSP) Projects.

(b)     Approves the addition of the following projects to the TSP IFF project schedule:

(i)      Tauriko Crossing Bus Facility Improvements

(ii)     City Centre public Transport infrastructure

(iii)     Barkes Corner to Tauranga Crossing Multi-modal local road components

(iv)    SH2 Revocation – Cameron Rd to Bethlehem.

 

(c)     Receives a further report on the outcome of finance proposals and further advice on the status of Waka Kotahi Funding to enable a final decision to be made on whether to proceed with a IFF Levy to finance and fund the 14 identified TSP projects.

(d)     Supports the drafting of a Levy Proposal and associated documentation in preparation for seeking Ministerial approvals should the IFF Levy be fully endorsed.

Carried

 

11.5       Tauriko West Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposal

Staff          Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy and Growth

                  Ben Corbett, Team Leader: Growth Funding    

 

Key points

·         Engagement would continue to be undertaken with landowners in the area on how the programme would roll out.

·         Existing home owners would not be charged only new ones, with most submitters preferring $1,000 rather than $2,500.

·         Assessments and opportunities to modify the model and affordability of different options would be carried out and independent advice sought prior to the next decision.

·         Developers were required to pay their fair share and the IFF was a mechanism for that.

·         IFF would free up the TCC balance sheet to do other projects that were in the pipeline.

 

In response to questions

·         The Tauriko West development was constrained to 2,000 houses, when there was room for 4,000.  This was due to permission from Waka Kotahi being withheld because of the transport network and access onto the state highway.

·         The development at Omokoroa was unable to proceed until adequate transport infrastructure was in place. 

·         To increase the housing numbers, a plan change would be required and Waka Kotahi would fight through that process.

·         IFF was based on 2,000 houses as any future development does not have any certainty.  This was sufficient to enable it to proceed. 

·         The use of development contributions would create a bigger risk on the balance sheet.

·         Frustration was noted at the conflicting government policy of requiring more homes to be built, when the Waka Kotahi policy was preventing this.

·         There was a need to change the system - Kainga Ora had bought land to support social needs but were also restrained by these policies.

Resolution  CO10/22/7

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Approves the Long-Term Plan Amendment reflecting an IFF Levy as a means of financing and funding for the Tauriko West growth area infrastructure.

(b)     Approves a levy proposal being prepared to introduce an Infrastructure Funding and Financing levy at Tauriko West.

(c)     Continues to engage in the finance process to identify a preferred financier and to confirm the cost of finance.

 

(d)     Continues to engage with relevant stakeholders, including landowners and developers in Tauriko West, to understand their views on the acceptability, or otherwise, of the proposed finance package; and

(e)     Receives a further report on completion of the finance process with a final levy proposal for Council’s consideration including details of the proposed levy model, the cost to levy payers over the levy period, and outcome of the landowner/developer engagement.

(f)      Supports the drafting of a Levy Proposal and associated documentation in preparation for seeking Ministerial approvals should the IFF levy be fully endorsed.

Carried

 

11.7       Executive Report to the Annual Plan

Staff          Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

                  Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

James Woodward, Delivery Manager

 

Key points

·         Management changes requested as work was unable to be completed within last year and had been added to this year.

·         Included an adjustment of how much could be achieved and included a capital programme adjustment of $55m.

 

In response to questions

Ongoing conversations were being held with Waka Kotahi on all network work decisions for rehabilitation and changes proposed.

·         Changes to the levels of service for walkways would be considered when the new Manager was in place and while it may result in extra funding, staff were unsure of the quantum as yet.

·         The Public Arts Policy would be provided to Council. Three locations would be made available to the Sculpture Trust and $106k provided for the link between Kulim and Fergusson Parks.

·         A Community Facilities Strategy would be provided to Council on 13 June 2022 which would include each community centre and community garden throughout the city.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Acknowledgment to staff for taking up the Graduate Programme and the benefits to the Council were noted.

·         It was important to deliver and complete the work programmes that had been approved last year and there was a high expectation from the community that these would be done.

Resolution  CO10/22/8

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Executive report to the Annual Plan.

(b)     Approves the amendments to the draft annual plan budget as proposed in this report.

(c)     Agrees to loan fund the following operational expenditure which provides long-term benefits greater than one year:

(i)      a grant to Gordon Spratt Tennis Club of $118,750 as part share of the costs of installing lights, with the loan to be retired over 10 years through the spaces and places activity

(ii)     note that previously agreed loan funded opex does not require additional approval.

(d)     Agrees to transfer rates surplus from 2022 of $7.1m to fund carried forward expenditure and additional costs of interest, revisions to Waka Kotahi revenue and the risks around expenditure budgets.

(e)     Agrees to the carry forward of loan or reserve-funded expenditure of $4.9m from 2021-22 to cover grants and infrastructure planning work and completion of minor projects.

(f)      Agrees to the revised capital programme (for TCC delivery and reimbursement)  of $298m after a capital programme adjustment of $55m.

(g)     Notes the capital figure above does not include $54m of costs for Tauriko West projects that were sitting in the LTP.  This cost along with land sales and vested assets brings the total capital programme to $320m.

(h)     Delegates to the Chief Executive the ability to bring forward projects approved as per the LTPA 2021-31 to manage deliverability across the capital programme subject to consistency with borrowing limits and the borrowing resolution.

(i)      Notes only $250K of the $750K budget is allocated to 2023. The remainder, including funding external funding, is recommended to be budgeted in 2024.

Carried

 

11.8       Annual Plan 2022/23 Deliberations - Issues and Options - Other feedback and suggestions

Staff          Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy and Growth

Gareth Wallis, General Manager: City Development & Partnerships

Josh Logan, Team Leader: Corporate Planning

Sam Fellows, Manager: Sustainability and Waste

Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure

 

Dive Crescent and the Tauranga Waterfront (Attachment 1)

Key points

·         The refreshed project was included in the broader waterfront geographical area with the first meeting of the group being held later at the end of May.

·         Funding was being sought to support short and medium term projects to develop the area as soon as possible so that the area could meet expectations and be open for events at the end of the year.

 

In response to questions

·         Creating drop off areas for prams and disabled needed to be addressed and greenspace would be maximised.

·         No work had been done at this stage in relation to the possibility of leased carparking.

·         As much parking space as possible would be created and would also bring broader CBD parking into the area. The new spaces would be confirmed in the near future.

·         Planting would be used to stop people parking on the grass berm.

·         The relocation of the water front playground and development would occur before end of the financial year.

Resolution  CO10/22/9

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Approves the inclusion of the following budgets in the 2022/23 financial year:

(i)      $1.45m for the Dive Crescent at-grade carpark project

(ii)     $2.6m for the Beacon Wharf remediation and upgrade project

(iii)     $5m for the Waterfront Reserve development project, noting the balance of funds needed to complete the project ($7m) need to be added to the 2023/24 financial year.

(iv)    $350K for the Cargo Shed interior fitout (Option 1).

Carried

Tourism Funding from the Airport Activity (Attachment 2)

Key points

·         $1m from airport reserves was ringfenced for tourism activities and would be brought into future LTPs to continue on an ongoing basis.

 

In response to questions

·         The government was requiring that funding continued to be provided for regional tourism operations.

·         Council was continually trying to generate other funding methods.

·         The Art Gallery Christmas light exhibition was designed to get people into town.

·         Robust framework was required to manage this funding now and into the future.

·         Strong signal to Tourism BOP that they also need to continue to access funding elsewhere. 

Resolution  CO10/22/10

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(b)     Establishes a tourism fund of $1 million to come out of the Airport reserves in the 2022/2023 financial year.

(c)     Allocates $621,000 of the fund towards continued funding for the implementation/delivery of Tourism Bay of Plenty’s destination management strategy, with some clearly measurable deliverables.

(d)     Agrees that the remaining balance of $379,000 would go towards funding beautification projects across key tourism hotspots/gateway and tourism activation, e.g. Mount North and Tauranga CBD, including $68,000 to be allocated to the Tauranga Art Gallery to contribute towards programme and exhibition costs for 2022/2023 (see Issues and Options – Tauranga Art Gallery Funding.) (Option 1).

Carried

Tauranga Art Gallery Funding (Attachment 3)

Resolution  CO10/22/11

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(e)     Approves a one-off increase to the operating grant of Tauranga Art Gallery of $68,000 in the Annual Plan 2022/23 to come out of the Airport activity, contributing to programme and exhibition costs to activate the CBD and tourism opportunities. (Option 4).

Carried

Community Grant Fund – Partnership Agreements (Attachment 4)

Key points

·         A report would be provided outlining the funding partnership agreements and work would continue with the five groups to ensure they had appropriate KPIs going into the partnership.

 

In response to questions

·         Groups requesting three-year agreements to allow them to be able to have certainty of funding would be addressed in the community funding report and a clear indication of this would be included in the next LTP.

Resolution  CO10/22/12

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(f)      Approves additional opex of $340,000 to be included in the Annual Plan 2022/23 to fund the following partnership agreements (Option 1):

(i)      Good Neighbour Aotearoa Trust $50,000

(ii)     Here to Help U $80,000

(iii)     Tauranga Community Food Bank $60,000

(iv)    Envirohub $100,000

(v)     SociaLink $50,000

Carried

Creative Bay of Plenty (Attachment 6)

Key points

·         The request pre-empted the arts strategy and duplicated some of the work being done.

Resolution  CO10/22/13

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(g)     Declines the funding request from Creative Bay of Plenty (Option 2).

Carried

Merivale Community Centre (Attachment 7)

Key points

·         A  much needed community centre, which when built the Council would own and the Trust would manage on a day to day basis.

·         The total cost of the project was $4.8m with Council providing $2.8m.

Resolution  CO10/22/14

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(h)     Approves the proposed budget adjustments to enable delivery of key community centre projects (Option 1):

 

(i)      Approves additional $3.9m (incl $2m external funding) to 2023/24 to enable completion of the Merivale Community Centre and add $100k per annum to a community centre operational budget from 202/25, pending agreement of a sustainable governance and management model.

(ii)     Endorses a new Council-led delivery model for the build, ownership and ongoing maintenance of Merivale Community Centre, with the Merivale Community Incorporated trust continuing to manage the centre.

Carried

Active reserves – Links, Gordon Spratt, Blake (Attachment 8)

Key points

·         Include in recommendation (ii) with associated rates-funded debt retirement…

·         Project made better use of existing assets with no need to purchase more land.

Resolution  CO10/22/15

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(i)      Reallocates Long-term Plan budgets in later years to enable delivery of active reserve improvement projects (Option 1):

(i)      Reallocates Long-term Plan budgets from later years to 2022/23 to provide an additional $6.2m towards active reserve improvement projects and note that $12.6m will be required in the 2023/24 and $22.7m in 2024/25.

(ii)     Agrees to loan fund $1.7m opex in 2022/23 for warm season grasses over a 10‑year period, with associated rates-funded debt retirement. Note that opex of $576k in 2023/24 and $2.8m in 2024/25 will also be required to be loan-funded over a 10-year period.

(iii)     Allocates $51k opex in 2022/23 towards for Blake Park mowing and note that ongoing opex will be required in future years to be confirmed through future Annual Plan and LTP processes.

Carried

At 12.27pm the meeting adjourned.

At 1.19pm the meeting reconvened

 

The Bay Oval Trust (Attachment 10)

Key points

·         Include in recommendation (j) to be loan-funded over 10 years, with associated debt retirement…

·         Assistance with funding the pavilion would allow the Trust to proceed with moving forward with the provision of an indoor training facility.

Resolution  CO10/22/16

Moved:       Commission Chair Anne Tolley

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(j)      Funds the shortfall request for the Stage 2 Pavilion (additional $1,934,240 grant in 2022/23 to be loan-funded over 10 years, with associated debt retirement) to, with other funders, enable the project to proceed; and

(k)     Supports in principle Council fund one-third ($2m) of the indoor training centre as part of a future Long-term Plan process if/when the Bay Oval Trust demonstrate funds have been secured for the remaining two-thirds and Council receives an annual update report on progress as part of the Annual Plan process (Option 3).

Carried

Carlton Street reserve playground (Attachment 11)

Key points

·         The work would not improve the potential to flood in the area as it was a stormwater reserve.

·         It would provide the community with a better facility while the Otūmoetai spatial plan was being developed.

Resolution  CO10/22/17

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(l)      Delivers improvements to Carlton Street Reserve playground and skate park (including accessibility, shade and skatepark improvements in 2022/23 utilising existing budgets.) (Option 1).

Carried

 

Sub-Regional Equine Racing Working Group and Relocation Study (Attachment 12)

Key points

·         Provided opportunities for the co-location of facilities in the area with TCC paying $80k and WBOPDC $40k of the cost.

Resolution  CO10/22/18

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(m)    Supports investigations of a potential racecourse relocation site in the Bay of Plenty by providing $80,000 funding for Stage 1 of the proposed Working Group and Relocation Study within the 2022/23 Annual Plan budget (Option 1).

Carried

 

Equestrian strategy funding (Attachment 13)

Resolution  CO10/22/19

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(n)     Continues to work with the Tauranga Equestrian Sports Association (TESA) group to complete a concurrent relocation site options study for day-to-day equestrian activities.

(o)     Notes that the racing working party will consider specific equestrian eventing opportunities, as appropriate.

(p)     Agrees not to fund the Tauranga Equestrian Strategy at this time.

(q)     Notes that better outcomes can be achieved for the Bay of Plenty region if the National Equestrian Strategy work and Bay of Plenty regional facilities work is undertaken prior to a Tauranga Equestrian Strategy being developed; and that the relocation site options study for day-to-day equestrian activities will feed into these processes (Option 1).

Carried

Sustainability Projects (Attachment 14)

Key points

·         A lot of strategic work was being done across every Council activity.

·         Quick win projects were provided through submissions e.g. replacing light fittings at the Historic Village.

In response to questions

·         Providing subsidies to work through consent process and to give initial boost to get projects moving such as worm farms, rain tanks and targeting some other specific areas.

·         Energy audits often ended up paying for themselves in the savings generated - e.g. street lighting saved $1.5m.

·         Holistic approach would be taken to savings with projects such as the use of waste water by-products to generate electricity, creating solar arrays across the buildings at the Historic Village.

·         Would create a package of initiatives for people to refer to and provide confidence to the public and have sustainable projects ingrained in their thinking.

Resolution  CO10/22/20

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(r)      Approves additional funding of $250,000 for sustainability initiatives (Options 1-5).

Carried

Te Maunga Redevelopment (Attachment 15)

Key points

·         Strong relationship developed with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) who had also used TCC as a model for creating a regional transfer station.

·         MfE was supporting the station and wanting TCC to do more, which would hopefully result in more funding to be able to receive full benefits for Te Maunga transfer station.

·         Recognition of the station as a regional hub for waste, and the opportunity to future proof it for the next 20-25 years.

·         The national waste levy would continue to increase by $10 per tonne until 2025 so continual need to look at ways to recycle, including through construction and demolition waste where loads were inspected and recyclable products removed for recycling.

Discussion points raised

·         It was noted that information on the facility would be included as an item for the next Mayoral Forum to share with regional partners to ensure they were aware that a regional facility was being developed.

·         If there was a shortfall in funding there may be an option to discuss a regional rate.

·         Acknowledgement of the government support for the project.

Resolution  CO10/22/21

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(s)     Approves the increased scope and increased Council contribution of $6m, with a report on a funding plan to follow if Ministry for the Environment funding to bridge the funding gap was not secured (Option 1).

Carried

Kingswood Road Traffic Calming (Attachment 18)

Key points

·         This road attracted unwanted behaviours behind the wheel.

·         A speed management plan for the city would allow some calming measures once the best option had been decided and residents consulted.

Discussion points raised

·         The petition was weighted with residents from the top end of the road - it was important that consultation occurred with all of the communities along the road.

·         There was a need to understand both ends of the roadway and come up with a solution that worked for the whole corridor.

Resolution  CO10/22/22

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(t)      Undertakes design and installation of speed management devices on Kingswood Road (Option 1).

Carried

 

11.9       Rating Policy Proposals

Staff          Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

                  Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

Jim Taylor, Transactional Services Manager

 

Key points

·         90% of submitters supported a targeted transport rate with the majority seeking implementation over a two-year period.

 

In response to questions

·         There was agreement with the alternate trip generation rates noted in the Transport Engineer’s report and these would be brought into the work over next 12 months.

·         The peer review report would be placed on the TCC website.

·         While most talked to thought a two-year phase in was reasonable, the Property Council did not want any changes as they felt that commercial property owners had been carrying the burden.

·         While it would be included in next year’s annual plan, no separate consultation would be required.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Signalled that Council wanted to investigate these further to ensure everyone was paying their fair share to run the city.

Resolution  CO10/22/23

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Deliberations Report – Rating Policy Proposals.

(b)     Approves the commercial and industrial sector contributing a larger share of the rate funding for the transportation activity.

(c)     Approves a phase-in period of two years for changes to the differentials:

(i)      Commercial and industrial general rate differential to move to 1.9 in 2022/23;

(ii)     Transportation targeted rate differential for commercial and industrial ratepayers to move to 3.33 in 2022/23;

(iii)     Includes a second increase in the commercial and industrial general rate differential to 2.13 in the 2023/24 Annual Plan process; 

(iv)    Includes a second increase in the transportation targeted rate differential for commercial and industrial ratepayers to 5 in the 2023/24 Annual Plan process.

(d)     Requests staff to continue to look at further options for the appropriate rating of the commercial and industrial sectors.

Carried

 

11.10     Submissions on the 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy

Staff          Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy and Growth

                  Ana Blackwood, Senior Advisor: Growth Funding

 

Key points

·         Submissions received had been analysed and each point had been responded to with further work being carried out prior to formal adoption of the policy.

Resolution  CO10/22/24

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)       Approves the responses to external submissions received on the draft 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy as set out in Attachment A and any consequential amendments required to the 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy and Annual Plan.

Carried

 

11.1       Long-term Plan Amendment/Annual Plan 2022/23 Deliberations (continued)

Resolution  CO10/22/25

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That Council:

(b)     Includes in the final drafting of the Annual Plan 2022/23 the resolutions relating to the following reports:

(i)      Executive Report to the Annual Plan

(ii)     Annual Plan 2022/23 Deliberations - Issues and Options other feedback and suggestions

(iii)     Rating Policy Proposals

(iv)    Tsunami Sirens.

(c)     Includes in the final drafting of the Long-term Plan Amendment the resolutions relating to the following reports:

(i)      Long-term Plan Amendment Deliberations - Civic Precinct Issues and Options Report

(ii)     Transport System Plan - Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposal

(iii)     Tauriko West - Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposal.

(d)     Notes staff comments on submissions relating to user fees and charges in Attachment 2.

(e)     Notes that the final User Fees and Charges 2022/23 document would be reported for adoption to Council at its meeting on 27 June 2022.

(f)      Reduces the amount of community targeted rate debt retirement charge for 2022-23 to ensure rates remain at the same level as the draft 2022/23 Annual Plan, noting the implications on debt and risk resulting.  This would be confirmed following processing all changes to the Annual Plan and was estimated at approximately $1.32m.

Carried

 

12          Discussion of Late Items

Nil

13          Public excluded session 

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

Resolution  CO10/22/26

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

Confidential Attachment 1 - 11.4 - Transport System Plan – Infrastructure Funding and Financing Proposal

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s48(1)(a) the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

Carried

 

 

14          Closing Karakia

Commissioner Shad Rolleston gave the closing karakia.

 

The meeting closed at 2.14 pm.

 

 

 

The minutes of this meeting were confirmed as a true and correct record at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 27 June 2022.

 

 

 

 

........................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

7.5         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 7 June 2022

File Number:           A13591502

Author:                    Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

Authoriser:             Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Council meeting held on 7 June 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.       Minutes of the Council meeting held on 7 June 2022 

  


UNCONFIRMEDOrdinary Council meeting Minutes

7 June 2022

 

 

 

MINUTES

Ordinary Council meeting

Tuesday, 7 June 2022

 


Order of Business

1          Opening karakia. 3

2          Apologies. 3

3          Public forum.. 3

4          Acceptance of late items. 3

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 3

6          Change to the order of business. 3

7          Confirmation of minutes. 3

Nil

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest 3

9          Deputations, presentations, petitions. 4

Nil

10       Recommendations from other committees. 4

Nil

11       Business. 4

Nil

12       Discussion of late items. 4

13       Public excluded session. 4

13.1          Approval to proceed with Housing Infrastructure Fund and Papamoa East Interchange  4

14       Closing karakia. 4

 


MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Ordinary Council meeting

HELD AT THE Ground Floor - Meeting Room 1, 306 Cameron Road, Tauranga

ON Tuesday, 7 June 2022 AT 9.30am

 

 

PRESENT:                 Commission Chair Anne Tolley, Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston, Commissioner Stephen Selwood, Commissioner Bill Wasley

IN ATTENDANCE:    Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Tony Aitken (Acting General Manager: People & Engagement), Paul Davidson (General Manager: Corporate Services), Barbara Dempsey (Acting General Manager: Community Services), Nic Johansson (General Manager: Infrastructure), Christine Jones (General Manager: Strategy & Growth), Ben Corbett (Team Leader: Growth Funding), Cashy Ball (Strategic Advisor to the Commission), Ross Boreham (Civic Communications Specialist to the Chief Executive and Mayor), Ceilidh Dunphy (Community Relations Manager), Coral Hair (Manager: Democracy Services), Sarah Drummond (Committee Advisor), Anahera Dinsdale (Committee Advisor)

1            Opening karakia

Commissioner Rolleston opened the meeting with a karakia.

2            Apologies

Nil

3            Public forum

Nil

4            Acceptance of late items

Nil

5            Confidential business to be transferred into the open

Nil

6            Change to the order of business

Nil

7            Confirmation of minutes

Nil

8            Declaration of conflicts of interest

Nil

9            Deputations, presentations, petitions

Nil

10          Recommendations from other committees

Nil

11          Business

Nil

12          Discussion of late items

Nil

13          Public excluded session

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

Resolution  CO11/22/1

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

13.1 - Approval to proceed with Housing Infrastructure Fund and Papamoa East Interchange

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

Carried

14          Closing karakia

Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston closed the meeting with a karakia.

The meeting closed at 10.08am.

 

The minutes of this meeting were confirmed as a true and correct record at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 27 June 2022.

 

........................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

7.6         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 June 2022

File Number:           A13591709

Author:                    Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

Authoriser:             Robyn Garrett, Team Leader: Committee Support

 

Recommendations

That the Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 June 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

Attachments

1.       Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 June 2022 

  


UNCONFIRMEDOrdinary Council meeting minutes

13 June 2022

 

 

 

MINUTES

Ordinary Council meeting

Monday, 13 June 2022

 


Order of Business

1          Opening karakia. 3

Staff presentation - Rex Maranda - 25 years' service. 3

2          Apologies. 3

3          Public forum.. 3

3.1            Public Forum - Sue Grey. 3

4          Acceptance of late items. 4

5          Confidential business to be transferred into the open. 4

6          Change to the order of business. 4

7          Confirmation of minutes. 4

7.1            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 April 2022. 4

7.2            Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 and 15 December 2021. 5

8          Declaration of conflicts of interest 5

9          Deputations, presentations, petitions. 5

Nil

10       Recommendations from other committees. 5

Nil

11       Business. 5

11.1          Links Avenue 2nd Trial residents petition. 5

11.2          A Vision for Tauranga. 7

11.3          Greerton Maarawaewae Future Options Study. 8

11.4          Aotearoa New Zealand's First Emissions Reduction Plan. 10

11.5          Submission to draft National Adaptation Plan. 11

11.6          Next Steps at Golf Road Reserve. 12

12       Discussion of late items. 13

13       Public excluded session. 13

13.1          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 April 2022. 14

13.2          Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 December 2021. 14

13.3          Appointment of Independent Chairperson of Tangata Whenua/Tauranga City Council Committee. 15

13.4          Exemption to open competition - technical security. 15

14       Closing karakia. 15

 


MINUTES OF Tauranga City Council

Ordinary Council meeting

HELD AT THE Bay of Plenty Regional Council Chambers, Regional House, 1 Elizabeth Street, Tauranga

ON Monday, 13 June 2022 AT 9.30am

 

 

PRESENT:                 Commission Chair Anne Tolley, Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston, Commissioner Stephen Selwood, Commissioner Bill Wasley

IN ATTENDANCE:    Marty Grenfell (Chief Executive), Tony Aitken (Acting General Manager: People & Engagement), Paul Davidson (General Manager: Corporate Services), Barbara Dempsey (General Manager: Community Services), Brendan Bisley (Director of Transport), Stuart Goodman (Team Leader: Regulation Monitoring), Ceilidh Dunphy (Community Relations Manager),  Sarah Stewart (Strategic Advisor), Jeremy Boase (Manager: Strategy & Corporate Planning), Carl Lucca (Programme Director: Urban Communities), Alistair Talbot (Team Leader: Transport Strategy & Planning), Andy Mead (Manager: City Infrastructure and Planning), Ross Hudson (Team Leader: Planning), Paul Dunphy (Director of Spaces and Places), Coral Hair (Manager: Democracy Services), Robyn Garrett (Team Leader: Committee Support), Sarah Drummond (Committee Advisor), Anahera Dinsdale (Committee Advisor)

1            Opening karakia

Commissioner Rolleston opened the meeting with a karakia.

 

Staff presentation - Rex Maranda - 25 years' service

·         Rex came to Council from Vanuatu as a Land Information Officer and moved to the GIS team in 2004 showing his talent in that developing area. 

·         Developed and managed the internal GIS viewer SmartZoom and managed internal mapping functions as well as SmartViewer.

·         Valued member of the emergency management team providing GIS support.

·         Great team player and all-round good guy to work with.

·         Congratulated and thanked for his dedication and service to TCC.

·         Rex Maranda thanked TCC for the opportunities given to him to enable him to further his skills within the organisation.

2            Apologies

Nil

3            Public forum

3.1         Public Forum - Sue Grey

Sue Grey spoke to the meeting outlining the following:

·         Concerned about democracy for the Council.

·         Over 5000 signature petition relating to Links Avenue was presented to Council. 

·         Did not feel that the staff recommendations were good enough as fines were not being waived and the community engagement was scheduled to take place after the trial.

·         Considered that the role of the Commissioners was to represent the people and their interests, not to try and change the behaviour of the people.

·         Expressed concern at LGNZ funding for Three Waters implementation as there was a lack of consultation with the paper early in the process and people’s input was being limited until after decisions were made.

·         A public meeting was held on 12 June 2022 to allow people to express their ideas and concerns about democracy.

·         Inquired whether Council could make a venue available for a monthly meeting free of charge to enable meetings about local democracy to take place.

·         Submitter would provide a power point presentation to Commissioners summarising her concerns.

·         In response the submitter was advised that Three Waters was a government legislative process, not a Council process; TCC would make a submission on the legislation which would then be made available for public feedback to ensure TCC residents and ratepayers views had been captured.

4            Acceptance of late items

Nil

5            Confidential business to be transferred into the open

Nil

6            Change to the order of business

Nil

7            Confirmation of minutes

7.1         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 April 2022

Resolution  CO12/22/1

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 April 2022 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

7.2         Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 and 15 December 2021

Correction - page 25 the date should be 15 December 2021 not 15 December 2022.

Resolution  CO12/22/2

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That, subject to the foregoing correction, the minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 and 15 December 2021 be confirmed as a true and correct record.

Carried

 

8            Declaration of conflicts of interest

Nil

9            Deputations, presentations, petitions

Nil

10          Recommendations from other committees

Nil

11          Business

11.1       Links Avenue 2nd Trial residents petition

Staff          Brendan Bisley, Director of Transport

Stuart Goodman, Team Leader: Regulation Monitoring

Nigel McGlone, Manager: Environmental Regulation

 

Key points

·         Reason for the trials was because of repeated approaches from the community regarding safety for the layout of Links Ave; safe system review completed showed an unacceptable level of risk as it was a residential street not a third arterial.

·         Without intervention there would be up to 9000/9500 vehicle movements a day.  Review showed the street was not safe in its current configuration therefore the trial could not be stopped as it would return to how it was. A solution must be provided with an alternative layout.

·         Increasing pressure on the road surface which had been temporarily fixed with chipseal, but would require a complete overhaul to properly fix the surface damage.

·         The last significant investment in roading infrastructure was when Tauranga had a population of 70,000.

·         There was no spare capacity within the system and congestion was building up in certain areas e.g. Welcome Bay for 15 years; Links Ave was a new pressure area due to B2B construction and increased commuter traffic.

·         Suggestion to form a community group to work with Council to come up with an alternative layout and a wider solution for the Links Ave area.

·         Just over 700 infringements had been issued to vehicles registered to local Links Ave area addresses, less than 10% of the total fines issued were to locals.  Approximately 20% of total fines issued were waived, generally for first offenders; 8,500 warning letters had been sent.

 

In response to questions

·         Upcoming changes to B2B – the evening peak traffic in particular would have an uninterrupted route home up and over which should make the trip to the east on the state highway more attractive with less congestion; the removal of the Bayfair lights would also assist.

·         B2B was due for completion in late 2023 and would provide two-five years of reasonable level of service before continued population growth would provide further challenges.

·         Works in Link Ave may only need to be there until the B2B was completed as that would then become the more desirable traffic route; there would still be congestion in Hewletts Road.

·         Any changes made to Links Ave could be reconsidered when B2B was opened – maybe possible to put Links Ave back to how it was if it was no longer the most desirable through route. 

·         The bus lane was installed on Links Ave due to high volume of traffic, if that volume dropped back and delays decreased, there would be no need for a separate bus lane.

·         Transport network capacity challenges on the main arterials resulted in rat-running such as Links Ave and 15th Ave to Welcome Bay.

·         TCC was predominantly a car-centric city with low utilisation of alternative modes so many arterials were already operating at capacity; as traffic rates increased it added to the queues.

·         Focus on alternative modes to shift 10% of the population to either travel at a different time of day or use a different mode.  Work was being done on cycleways to make it safer to bike and different design options were being looked at for the public transport system. 

·         There was a combination of measures to try and find capacity in the peak hours, otherwise congestion would spread across the city and alternative routes would also become congested.  There would always be a part of the population that had to use a car, but work was being done to enable/encourage those that had the flexibility to move away from cars.

·         Relevant data on how much time using Links Avenue saved motorists would be vital for the community panel to make informed decisions. An anonymous Bluetooth probe system was being used to provide comparative data on travel time via the various routes in the area, however this was complicated by drivers politely letting in other drivers turning in and out of rat-run routes.

·         When B2B reached capacity, it was likely that the same situation would repeat with Links Avenue and other parts of the network. 

·         Staff were working through business case projects for key transport infrastructure projects, but construction was unlikely to start until 2025/26.  Investigating smaller refinements and any possible minor network changes that would improve peak capacity flow such as T1/T2 bus lanes to help manage congestion until the major projects were underway.

·         Links Ave prior to B2B was sitting around 2500 vehicle movements a day, mostly local resident traffic; with B2B it was up to 7500 movements and could reach 9000 movements which included mainly commuter traffic from Papamoa.  The residential growth rate in the Papamoa area had not been catered for within the transport infrastructure.  Unfortunately, much of the traffic tended to follow other traffic.

·         The Community Panel had required outcomes and criteria that any solution needed to achieve; if the panel could come up with a solution that met those criteria, then would be happy to consider and implement if possible.  Could not go back to the way Links Ave was before the trial as the risk of a serious accident was too high.

·         If additional budget was required to implement the community panel recommended solution, then a report would come back to Council for that extra funding.  All options had a cost and some options could be difficult to complete with the high volumes of traffic.

·         A previous options paper from 2020 could be provided to the community panel.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Request for further information on the number of local Links Ave area residents that were receiving dispensation as they should be able to use their local road without a charge or penalty.

·         Two different communities impacted – local Links Ave area residents; and the wider Papamoa/Mount community that was using Links Ave as a through road.

·         The transport system was at a stage where it was not coping so people were looking for alternative routes and putting pressure on roads not designed for significant traffic loads.

·         Commissioners/Council had approved significant investment in the transport infrastructure.

·         Noted proposed new government requirements re emissions reduction would have a significant impact; extremely problematic with a growing city like Tauranga.  Use of electric vehicles would not address congestion issues.

Resolution  CO12/22/3

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report and staff recommendations as follows:

·     Tickets that have been and will be issued during the trial are not refunded

·     The trial continues for the intended full duration to correctly assess its impact

·     The residents surveys are completed, staff report back on the trial in August and the community panel is formed as soon as possible to discuss alternative layouts for the street to implement the safety outcomes needed beyond the current trial. The community panel recommendations are also reported back in August ideally.

Carried

 

11.2       A Vision for Tauranga

Staff          Ceilidh Dunphy, Community Relations Manager

                  Sarah Stewart, Strategic Advisor

 

Key points

·         Vision created a shared identity and inspired meaningful change; a large amount of community engagement had been undertaken utilising a variety of means and media e.g. facilitated workshops, social media, My Tauranga Vibe.

·         Distilled into three key pillars – environment, community and inclusivity, vibrancy.

·         Tagline – Tauranga, together we can.

·         Vision would sit above the TCC strategic framework project, and would be a clear vision to link and guide TCC works and could also be used by local businesses and organisations.

·         The City Vision video was played.

 

In response to questions

·         Creating further collateral for other users to access was the next step. This would bring stakeholders together with TCC and an independent designer would be used to develop collateral that was appropriate for a variety of stakeholders to use.

·         The vision was not a branding exercise but a unifying theme.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Noted the huge amount of work that had been put in by the community.

·         Previous visions were never successfully anchored and implemented.

·         Was a community vision for Tauranga City not just for the Council.

·         Test would be how far how it reached into the community and by people recognising the theme and responding to it.

·         Together we can was a catchy by-line; if “Tauranga” was removed it could also be applicable for the wider Bay of Plenty.

Resolution  CO12/22/4

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Stephen Selwood

That the Council:

(a)     Acknowledges the valuable contribution made by the community that has enabled the development of a vision for Tauranga.

(b)     Endorses the following Vision for Tauranga:

Tauranga, together we can

·    Prioritise nature

Tauranga is a city where we celebrate, protect and enhance our natural environment.

·    Lift each other up

Tauranga is a city where we foster and grow our communities, celebrate our differences, and lift-up those who are vulnerable.

·    Fuel possibility

Tauranga is a city where we foster creativity and innovation, celebrate our arts and culture, and empower our changemakers to create a vibrant city into the future.

 

With everyone playing their part

Together we can create the change our city needs

Kei a tātou te pae tawhiti

The future is all of ours

Because, Tauranga, together we can.

 

(c)     Adopts the Vision for Tauranga (as per (b) above) as the overarching vision for Tauranga City Council.

Carried

 

11.3       Greerton Maarawaewae Future Options Study

Staff          Carl Lucca, Programme Director: Urban Communities

 

External    Elizabeth Hughes, Steve Bramley, Glenn Brebner, Martin Udale

 

Key points

·         Three options recommended to form the basis for consultation with the community, mana whenua and existing stakeholders as noted in the report.

·         Noted that if the Crown decided not to proceed with the health precinct option, then that option would revert to Option B - the central park option.

·         All options removed the use of the site for housing expansion.

·         The area was strategically located in the Te Papa spatial intensification corridor.

·         Outlined the process undertaken to date in terms of option identification and an analysis of each.

·         Ngai Tamarawaho supported the continued use of the land as a reserve and had initiated legal proceedings.

·         Relocation of the hospital to the site would free up the current hospital site for development.

·         Recommendations were for further consultation on the three options, followed by a hearings process.

·         The team had spent a significant amount of time with the current equestrian users – Tauranga Racing and Tauranga Equestrian Sports Association (TESA) - who were very collaborative and supportive.  Noted was the uncertainty created by the process for the current users and their cooperation with Council.

·         Important to optimise the golf course site for more than golf, as there was not an under-supply of golf facilities in Tauranga.

In response to questions

·         The assessment process gave careful consideration to green outcomes, housing needs, net cost; the health precinct emerged during the consultation process. 

·         The weighting process and how the criteria matrix was developed was outlined.  There was a multiplier effect from the community feedback especially in regard to green space weighting.  The application of the various weightings resulted in the identification of the three options.

·         Even with the hospital included, only a small percentage of the overall open space in the reserve was utilised.

·         Current users were open to working with Council around options and possible relocation.

·         There was a need to find out how the community felt about the hospital being located on that site; fuller consultation around the hospital was desirable as there had been only limited information available on the health precinct option when the initial community consultation was undertaken.

·         Hearings in mid-September were not practical for the Commissioners.  It was noted that the recommendations in the report did not commit to a precise timetable.

·         Working through this process would help clarification of what Council considered to be the right use for this site and would allow the DHB to refine their future requirements.

·         Transport impacts were assessed at a very high level with the different options having different outcomes in relation to transport; generally any of the three options supported the current direction of transport planning and investment e.g. Cameron Road upgrade.

·         By approving Consultation Option A as the preferred option, it would effectively approve Option B as the next fallback position if the health precinct use did not eventuate.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Noted this was a very long-term planning process which looked at the use of this land over the next 20-40 years; there were existing leases in place for a number of years yet. 

·         Trying to provide some certainty for the public, mana whenua and existing users on an appropriate use for that site; final decisions, apart from the decision to remove general residential housing options, were still a long way off.

·         The protection of the city’s green spaces was important to the community.

 

Resolution  CO12/22/5

Moved:       Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

Seconded:  Commissioner Bill Wasley

That the Council:

(a)     Approves consultation on the following options for the future use of the Tauranga Racecourse Reserve:

(i)      Consultation Option A:  Merged option of:

(1)     Health and Recreation (Study Option 7plus); and

(2)     If Health New Zealand and the Crown decide not to progress with a health facility on the site, then reverts to Central Park (Study Option 3plus).

(ii)     Consultation Option B: Central Park (Study Option 3plus).

(iii)     Consultation Option C: Enhanced status quo (Study Option 2).

(b)     Approves ‘Consultation Option A’ in (a) (i) above as the preferred option.

(c)     Delegates the Chief Executive to approve consultation material, based on the information contained within this report and the attachments, and also the 11 April 2022 Council report and attachments.

(d)     Removes general residential housing options from further consideration and undertakes the following consequential actions:

(i)      Removes reference to ‘comprehensively developed housing’ as it relates to the Greerton Racecourse Reserve from the Te Papa Spatial Plan and other relevant strategic documents.

(ii)     Recommends to the SmartGrowth Leadership Group that the Tauranga Racecourse Reserve be recognised as assessed as not providing a future residential housing opportunity.

Carried

 

At 11.25am the meeting adjourned.

At 11.45am the meeting reconvened.

11.4       Aotearoa New Zealand's First Emissions Reduction Plan

Staff          Andy Mead, Manager: City & Infrastructure Planning

Alistair Talbot, Team Leader: Team Leader: Structure Planning & Strategic Transport

 

Key points

·         The plan had been under development for quite some time; Climate Change Commission was created which engaged with communities and provided recommendations through to government.

·         Various emissions budgets recommended throughout the economy, would impact/inform almost everything the Council did. 

·         Emissions reduction budgets were set over three-year periods and set reduction targets.

·         Key challenges were in transport in terms of reducing reliance on private car travel, with a target of 20% reduction in light fleet kilometres travelled, Vehicle Kilometre Travel (VKT) targets.  Emissions reductions would need to flow into infrastructure planning and projects; developing a regional emissions tool would feed back into UFTI. The emissions tool being developed would provide the ability to distinguish between light commercial use and private use.

·         UFTI development work indicated a predicted 30% increase in VKT, the Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) required a 20% VKT reduction – there would be real challenges in responding to the ERP requirements.

 

In response to questions

·         Freight was singled out, but all other light fleet was grouped together regardless of commercial or personal travel use.

·         Need to think about a just transition particularly for undeveloped Māori land with no capital available to develop; needed to be able to provide Māori the ability to develop without being penalised or disadvantaged; some had not had the same opportunities to invest and develop.

·         Original submission to the draft document picked up on concerns that VKT was the wrong target, and a more holistic approach was needed e.g. a shift away from petrol cars to alternative fuel vehicles to achieve the 2050 emissions targets.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Need good discussions to occur between Council, mana whenua and Te Rangapū to develop an allied view to present to Waka Kotahi. Noted the partnership at TSP level as well.

·         Plan was inconsistent internally – incentivised purchase of electric vehicles but does not allow them to be driven as a VKT reduction was also required.

·         Understood the imperative to reduce carbon emissions but considered targeting VKT was the wrong target, it should be targeting emissions reduction.  Could end up with the wrong outcome with reduced VKTs but no emissions reduction.

·         Need to present a combined regional position to government and convince them that emissions reduction targets needed to be addressed, not just VKT targets.

Resolution  CO12/22/6

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report titled Aotearoa New Zealand’s First Emissions Reduction Plan.

Carried

 

11.5       Submission to draft National Adaptation Plan

Staff          Andy Mead, Manager: City Infrastructure and Planning

 

Key points

·         Included a policy document around managed retreat in the future.  Impacted on areas in terms of investment and development of more vulnerable areas of the city; also possible impacts on Māori land.

 

Discussion points raised

·         Managed retreat was difficult, personal and expensive and central government must also be involved as it should not solely be the responsibility of local government. 

·         The effect of managed retreat on communities and individuals should not be underestimated.

·         Important to identify and recognise where the liability actually lies and how costs should be apportioned.

 

Resolution  CO12/22/7

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Notes the submission made to the draft National Adaptation Plan (included as Attachment 1).

Carried

 

11.6       Next Steps at Golf Road Reserve

Staff          Barbara Dempsey, General Manager: Community Services

                  Ross Hudson, Team Leader: Planning

                  Paul Dunphy, Director of Spaces and Places

 

Key points

·         Ensured land was suitably classified to allow the playcentre to be developed, and to work towards the development of a community centre and community garden.

·         This was the end of a very long journey for the playcentre.

·         Menz Shed was seeking sole occupation of a building so were unsuitable for this site.

·         Beach volleyball was more appropriately located further away from residential areas as it could become quite noisy at times.

·         Talks would continue with beach volleyball and the Menz Shed about appropriate locations, looking at the wider network e.g. including beach volleyball in one of the larger active reserves.

 

 

In response to questions

·         Noted that beach volleyball was a growing sport; and an appropriate location was needed.

·         Process was being brought to an end - making the decision to change the land classification from recreation reserve to local purpose reserve and that Mount Playcentre would move to the site.

·         Resource consent requirement for the community garden was related to possible contamination of land due to agrichemical use by the bowling club.  This may have budgetary implications for the remediation of sites.

·         There would likely be a significant increase in traffic use and parking requirements for beach volleyball.

Resolution  CO12/22/8

Moved:       Commissioner Bill Wasley

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the Council:

(a)     Agrees that pursuant to section 24 of the Reserves Act 1977, and pursuant to a Council resolution dated 8 February 2022, the Tauranga City Council as the administering body for this reserve hereby resolves to change the classification of Section 1 within Section 106 Block VII Tauranga Survey District (Golf Road Reserve) from Recreation Reserve to Local Purpose (Community Building) Reserve.

(b)     Endorses the intended future use of the remainder of the Golf Road Reserve as a community garden with the former bowling club building retained as a bookable neighbourhood community space (subject to detailed building assessment).

(c)     Endorses an investigation into options for the provision of Council land for development of a beach volleyball centre, to be considered within the wider sport and recreation planning work currently underway.

Carried

 

12          Discussion of late items

Nil

13          Public excluded session

RESOLUTION TO EXCLUDE THE PUBLIC

Resolution  CO12/22/9

Moved:       Commissioner Stephen Selwood

Seconded:  Commissioner Shadrach Rolleston

That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject matter of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48 of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

 

 

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48 for the passing of this resolution

13.1 - Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 11 April 2022

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information, or information from the same source, and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.2 - Public Excluded Minutes of the Council meeting held on 13 December 2021

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

 

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations)

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.3 - Appointment of Independent Chairperson of Tangata Whenua/Tauranga City Council Committee

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

13.4 - Exemption to open competition - technical security

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable Council to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities

s48(1)(a) - the public conduct of the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding would exist under section 6 or section 7

Carried

 

14          Closing karakia

Commissioner Rolleston closed the meeting with a karakia.

 

The meeting closed at 12.30pm.

 

The minutes of this meeting were confirmed as a true and correct record at the Ordinary Council meeting held on 27 June 2022.

 

 

 

........................................................

CHAIRPERSON

 


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

8            Declaration of conflicts of interest

 

9            Deputations, presentations, petitions

Nil

10          Recommendations from other committees

Nil


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

11          Business

11.1       Annual Plan 2022/23 - Adoption Report

File Number:           A13547772

Author:                    Josh Logan, Team Leader: Corporate Planning

Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

Tracey Hughes, Financial Insights & Reporting Manager

Ariell King, Corporate Planner

Authoriser:             Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       For Council to adopt the final Annual Plan 2002/23 and User Fees and Charges 2022/23.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Adopts the Annual Plan 2022/23 (Attachment 1).

(b)     Adopts the user fees and charges for 2022/23 (Attachment 2).

(c)     Authorises the Chief Executive to make any necessary minor drafting or presentation amendments to the Annual Plan 2022/23, and user fees and charges 2022/23 prior to final printing.

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       Following consultation on the draft Annual Plan 2022/23, Council considered the submissions and deliberated on 24 May 2022. The decisions made by Council during the deliberations have been incorporated into the Annual Plan 2022/23. The final plan is presented to Council for adoption.

DISCUSSION

3.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) requires Council to adopt an annual plan for each financial year, prior to commencement of that year. The annual plan’s purpose includes setting the proposed budget, identifying variations from the LTP, providing for integrated decision making, and providing accountability to the community.

4.       The Council considered and provided direction on issues related to the content and development of the draft Annual Plan 2022/23 through a series of meetings from December 2021 to February 2022. The reports, agendas and minutes relating to these annual plan meetings can be found on Council’s website (https://www.tauranga.govt.nz/council/about-your-council/council-meetings-agendas-and-minutes). These decisions were reflected in the draft Annual Plan 2022/23 Consultation Document and supporting information. These documents were presented to the community for consultation.

5.       Consultation on the draft Annual Plan 2022/23 was undertaken between
25 March and 26 April 2022. A total of 1,181 submissions were received with 55 submitters speaking at the hearings held on the 9th and 11th May 2022. Many topics were covered, including issues presented in the consultation document and other feedback and suggestions.

6.       Council met on 24 May 2022 to deliberate and make decisions on the content of the final annual plan. The final Annual Plan 2022/23 (Attachment 1) incorporates these decisions and is presented for adoption by Council.

 

Key decisions following deliberations

7.       Key decisions approved by Council following deliberations include:

(a)     Funding for tsunami education and deciding not to install a tsunami siren network.

(b)     $1.45m for the Dive Crescent at-grade carpark project

(c)     $2.6m for the Beacon Wharf remediation and upgrade project

(d)     $5m for the Waterfront reserve development project (with a further $7m required in 2023/24)

(e)     Bringing forward $6.2m from later years to 2022/23 to enable delivery of active reserve improvement projects

(f)      Increase in Council’s funding towards the Te Maunga Transfer Station redevelopment by $6m – this does not affect the 2022/23 year.

8.       A number of rating policy proposals were also adopted including the commercial and industrial sectors share of the rate for the transportation activity and phasing the commercial and industrial general rate differentials and transportation targeted rate differential in over a two-year period.

9.       Decisions on other topics raised by submitters include the establishment of a Tourism Development Fund and funding decisions concerning the Tauranga Art Gallery, Merivale Community Centre, Community Partnerships, sustainability projects, the Bay Oval and the Equestrian Strategy.

 

Financial and Funding Implications through deliberations

10.     Deliberations confirmed updates to operating income and expenditure since the draft annual plan of an additional $20m in operating expenditure and a reduction in operating revenue of $0.2m. There was no increase in the level of rates consulted on in the draft.  Most of this expenditure and funding is either carried forward from 2022 or has utilised loan funding, reserve funding or brought forward cash balances.  Unutilised general rates from 2022 have been carried forward to offset general rates requirement in 2023.

11.     Additional operational expenditure as a result of deliberations (as outlined in paragraph 9) totalled $4.1m generating a rates impact of $1.3m, the remainder being funded from cash balances or loans (for capital grants). It was agreed to offset the additional rates requirement by a reduction in rates funded debt retirement so that the overall rates increase would remain at 13.7% (after rating base growth of 1.7%). The reduction in debt retirement recognises that other avenues of funding and financing are becoming more certain.

12.     Since deliberations, final analysis of rating base growth throughout 2021/22 shows growth to be 1.5% not 1.7%.  To maintain the 13.7% after-growth rates increase a further $600,000 of rates funded debt retirement has been removed.

13.     Various amendments to the capital programme have reduced the total programme by $8m, mainly as a result of moving expenditure into later years. This has been largely offset by cost adjustments and additional capital expenditure approved through deliberations as outlined in paragraph 7.

 

Key financial indicators and consistency with LTP and Financial Strategy

14.     The table below summarises the financials for 2022/23 to be adopted. The full financials are included within the final Annual Plan 2022/23 document at Attachment 1. After deliberations the total rates increase including metered water remains at 13.7% as proposed in the consultation document.

 

USER FEES and Charges

15.     User fees and charges are updated by Council on an annual basis. Updates reflect changing circumstances, Consumer Price Index (CPI) adjustments, new or removed fee requirements, or benchmarking with other Councils. Some user fees and charges are set by government legislation. The user fees and charges must fairly reflect the cost of services available and offered by Council.

16.     The majority of increases to the user fees and charges for the 2022/23 financial year were based on a CPI assumption of 5.9%. Where suitable, user fees and charges were rounded to the nearest dollar.

17.     Significant or material changes to the user fees and charges were publicly consulted on alongside the Annual Plan 2022/23. Submissions were considered during the deliberations.

18.     There we no recommended changes to the user fees and charges during deliberations. Proposed responses to the four submissions were approved by Council. Submitters will receive these responses as part of the overall response to each submitter which will commence after approval of the Annual Plan.

19.     Since the annual plan deliberations, the fees and charges document has been updated for ‘Animal Services fees’ to be in alignment with the decision made by Council on 11 April 2022 to increase the Dog registration by $5 to $97.00 per dog and $145.50 for Dangerous Dogs. In addition, Council also resolved to set the penalty for dogs that are not registered by 31 July at 50% of the standard fee.

20.     The user fees and charges schedule has been updated accordingly and is presented at Attachment 2 for adoption by Council. These user fees and charges will take effect from July 1, aside from the Animal Services fee which has already taken effect.

Strategic / Statutory Context

21.     The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) requires local authorities to prepare and adopt an Annual Plan for each financial year. This report is in relation to the 2022/23 financial year, which is the second year of the Long-term Plan 2021-31 (LTP). Consultation on the annual plan is only required if there are changes that are significantly or materially different from the LTP.

Options Analysis

Option 1: Adopt the Annual Plan 2022/23 and user fees and charges

22.     This option would adopt the Annual Plan 2022/23 as presented at Attachment 1 and the user fees and charges (Attachment 2).

Advantages

Disadvantages

·    An annual plan is adopted for the 2022/23 financial year.

·    User fees and charges are adopted.

·  None

Recommended? Yes

 

Option 2: Amend or do not approve the Annual Plan 2022/23 and user fees and charges

23.     This option would not approve the Annual Plan 2022/23, and user fees and charges which have both been developed with Council and undergone consultation with the public.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·  None

·  Council would be at risk of not adopting an annual plan prior to the financial year to which it relates.

Recommended? No

Legal Implications / Risks

The role of the Annual Plan

24.     The Annual Plan is Council’s resource-allocation document for the year ahead. 

25.     Legally, the purpose of the Annual Plan is set out in section 95(5) of the Local Government Act 2002 (“the Act”) as being to:

(a)     contain the proposed annual budget and funding impact statement for the year to which the annual plan relates; and

(b)     identify any variation from the financial statements and funding impact statement included in the local authority’s long-term plan in respect of the year; and

(c)     provide integrated decision making and co-ordination of the resources of the local authority; and

(d)     contribute to the accountability of the local authority to the community.

26.     The Act also requires, at section 95(6), that the Annual Plan be prepared in accordance with the principles and procedures that apply to the Long-term Plan. 

Significance

27.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

28.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in,

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

29.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the Annual Plan 2022/23 is of high significance.

Consultation / Engagement

30.     Consultation has been carried out in accordance with the Significance and Engagement Policy and the LGA. The resulting submissions were considered in developing the final Annual Plan 2022/23.

31.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the Annual Plan 2022/23 is of high significance, and a consultation process has just concluded, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

32.     Letters will be sent to submitters providing information on the decisions made by Council through the Annual Plan deliberation process.

Next Steps

33.     Following Council adoption, the Annual Plan 2022/23 will form the basis of the Council’s budget and workplan for the 2022/23 financial year (1 July 2022 – 30 June 2023).

Attachments

1.       Annual Plan 2022-23 - PDF - 200622 - A13591742 (Separate Attachments 1)  

2.       User Fees & Charges - 2022-23 - A13563898 (Separate Attachments 1)   

 

           


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

11.2       Annual Plan 2022/23 - Other topics

File Number:           A13423125

Author:                    Ariell King, Corporate Planner

Josh Logan, Team Leader: Corporate Planning

Jeremy Boase, Manager: Strategy and Corporate Planning

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       Community engagement on the draft Annual Plan 2022/23 (AP) and Long-term Plan Amendment 2021-2031 (LTPA) have been completed.  This report is provided for Council to consider proposed responses to other topics raised through consultation.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Approves staff comments on submissions relating to other topics in Attachment 1.

(b)     Authorises the Chief Executive and General Managers to make amendments to Council’s proposed response comments to each submission point in Attachment 1, to refine wording and style prior to responses being sent to submitters no later than one month after the adoption of the AP and LTPA.

 

 

Background

2.       Public consultation for the AP and LTPA was undertaken for a month and ended on 26 April 2022. 1,181 submissions were received, with 55 of these submitters choosing to present at hearings from 9 – 10 May 2022.  Many topics were covered, including items specifically identified for public feedback in the consultation document.

3.       This report covers the other topics which were not specifically consulted on, or which were not covered by other reports on the agenda for the deliberations meeting on 24 May 2022.

4.       For these other topics, Attachment 1 provides a summary of the points made by the submitter and a proposed Council response.

Strategic / Statutory Context

5.       The AP is part of Council’s decision-making framework and sets out the intended budgets and work plans for the coming year. The LTPA sets out the differences from the LTP adopted in 2021.

Options Analysis

6.       Council has the following options regarding this report:

·    Accept all the responses as drafted and approve them for communication back to submitters

·    Formally amend some, or all, of the responses before approving them for communication back to submitters.

7.       Further, if Council considers that any of the matters covered in Attachment 1 warrant a separate decision-making process, those matters should be identified and advice taken on the appropriate procedural route for that decision-making i.e., whether a new report is required and, if so, what the realistic timeframes for that decision-making may be.

Consultation / Engagement

8.       A formal submission process was undertaken for the AP and LTPA using the Special Consultative Procedure under the Local Government Act 2002.

Significance

9.       The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

10.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the LTP.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

11.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the AP and LTPA is of high significance.   However, the decision sought through this report, to approve or amend responses to individual submitters, is considered to be of low significance. 

ENGAGEMENT

12.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the decision required through this report is of low significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

Next Steps

13.     All submitters will be sent a letter or an email advising where they can find a summary of all the key decisions once the AP and LTPA has been adopted. All individualised response letters or emails will be sent within one month of adoption of the AP and LTPA.

Attachments

1.       AP 202223 Responses to other topics PDF - A13574006 (Separate Attachments 1)    


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

11.3       Rates Resolution 2022/2023

File Number:           A13549941

Author:                    Jim Taylor, Transactional Services Manager

Authoriser:             Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       To resolve to set and assess the 2022/2023 rates.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)        Sets the following rates under the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Funding Impact Statement in the Annual Plan for the 2022/2023 rating year, on rating units in the city for the financial year commencing on 1 July 2022 and ending on 30 June 2023. 

      The rates and charges specified are inclusive of Goods and Services Tax at the prevailing rate.

I.    General Rate

 

A general rate set under section 13(2) (b) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at:

 

·      A rate of $ 0.00179665 in the dollar of capital value on all residential rateable rating units in the city.

·      A rate of $0.00341364 in the dollar of capital value on all commercial rateable rating units in the city.

 

(“residential” and “commercial” are as defined in the Funding Impact Statement).

II.   Uniform Annual General Charge

 

A uniform annual general charge set under section 15(1)(b) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at:

 

·      A rate of $251.00 per separately used or inhabited part of a rateable rating unit.

III.  Waste Collection Rate

Uniform targeted rates for the kerbside waste collection services, set under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, on all rating units in the city on which there is one or more residential use and that will be provided with the low, standard or high waste collection service, at:

 

·      A rate of $190 per low waste service capacity provided for each residential use on each rating unit in the City.

·      A rate of $220 per standard waste service capacity provided for each residential use on each rating unit in the City.

·      A rate of $320 per high waste service capacity provided for each residential use on each rating unit in the City.

IV.  Garden Waste Rate (optional)

 

Uniform targeted rates for garden waste collection services, set under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, on all rating units in the city used for residential purposes and that will be provided with the garden waste collection service, at:

 

·    A rate of $100 for each garden waste bin (two weekly collection).

 

·    A rate of $70 for each garden waste bin (four weekly collection).

 

V.   Wastewater Rate

 

A differential targeted rate for wastewater, set under sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(b) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at:

 

·    A rate of $580.80 for each water closet or urinal in a connected rating unit in the city.

 

·    A rate of $290.40 per separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit for any serviceable rating units in the city.

 

(“separately used or inhabited part of a”, “connected” and “serviceable” rating units, are defined in the Funding Impact Statement).

 

A rating unit used primarily as a residence for 1 household will not be treated as having more than 1 water closet or urinal.

VI.  Stormwater Rate

 

A targeted rate for stormwater infrastructure investment, set under section 16(3)(a) and 16(4) (b) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at:

 

·    A rate of $0.00001338 in the dollar of capital value on all residential rateable rating units in the city.

 

·    A rate of $0.00002141 in the dollar of capital value on all commercial rateable rating units in the city.

 

VII. Water Supply Rates

 

Volumetric rate

 

A targeted rate for metered water supply set under section 19(2)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at

 

·      A rate of $3.33 per cubic metre of water supplied.

 

Base rate

 

A differential targeted rate per connection on every rating unit in the City which is provided with a metered water supply service, set under sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(b) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, calculated on the basis of the nature of the connection size as follows:

 

Meter Size

Amount

20mm

$37.00

25mm

$70.00

32mm

$70.00

40mm

$289.00

50mm

$572.00

80mm

$1,143.00

100mm

$1,407.00

150mm

$1,407.00

200mm

$1,407.00

250mm

$1,407.00

 

VIII.            Water Supply Rates (unmetered)

 

Unmetered rate

 

A uniform targeted rate on every rating unit in the City which is provided with and connected to an unmetered water supply service, set under sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, at:

 

·      A rate of $851.00 for each separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit as defined in the Funding Impact Statement.

IX.  Economic Development Rate

A targeted rate for economic development in the City, set under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at:

 

·      A rate of $0.00037558 in the dollar of capital value on every commercial rateable rating unit (as defined in the Funding Impact Statement).

 

X.   Mainstreet Rates

 

Targeted rates for Mainstreet organisations, set under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, at:

 

·    A rate of $0.00040559 in the dollar of capital value for every commercial rating unit in the Tauranga Mainstreet rating area as defined in the Funding Impact Statement.

 

·    A rate of $0.00049101 in the dollar of capital value for every commercial rating unit in the Mt Maunganui Mainstreet rating area as defined in the Funding Impact Statement.

 

 

·    A rate of $0.00137617 in the dollar of capital value for every commercial rating unit in the Greerton Mainstreet rating area as defined in the Funding Impact Statement.

 

·    A rate of $0.00024353 in the dollar of capital value for every commercial rating unit in the Papamoa Mainstreet area as defined in the Funding Impact Statement.

 

XI.  Special Services Rates

 

            ‘The Lakes’ Targeted Rate

A uniform targeted rate for additional levels of service in relation to maintenance and renewal of street gardens, street trees, footpaths and the removal of litter from ponds provided to ‘The Lakes’ subdivision, located at Pyes Pa, set under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, at:

 

·      A rate of $102.59 per rating unit located within ‘The Lakes’ subdivision as defined in the Funding Impact Statement.

 

            ‘The Coast Papamoa’ Targeted Rate

A uniform targeted rate for additional levels of service in relation to maintenance and renewal of street trees and footpaths provided to ‘The Coast Papamoa’ subdivision, located at Papamoa, set under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, at:

 

·    A rate of $35.01 per rating unit located within ‘The Coast Papamoa’ subdivision as defined in the Funding Impact Statement.

 

            ‘The Excelsa’ Targeted Rate

A uniform targeted rate for additional levels of service in relation to maintenance and renewal of street gardens, street trees and up lights under trees provided to ‘The Excelsa’ subdivision, located at Papamoa, set under section 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, at:

 

·    A rate of $51.78 per rating unit located within ‘The Excelsa’ subdivision as defined in the Funding Impact Statement.

XII. Resilience Rate

A targeted rate for resilience infrastructure investment in Water, Wastewater, Stormwater, Transportation and Emergency Management, set under section 16(3)(a) and 16(4) (b) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at:

 

·    A rate of $0.00001012 in the dollar of capital value on all residential rateable rating units in the city.

 

·    A rate of $0.00001619 in the dollar of capital value on all commercial rateable rating units in the city.

 

 

XIII.            Transportation Rate

A targeted rate for Transportation infrastructure investment, set under section 16(3)(a) and 16(4) (b) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at:

 

·    A rate of $0.00003966 in the dollar of capital value on all residential rateable rating units in the city.

 

·    A rate of $0.00013207 in the dollar of capital value on all commercial rateable rating units in the city.

XIV.           Community Rate

A targeted rate for Community amenity investment, set under section 16(3)(a) and 16(4) (b) of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 at:

 

·    A rate of $0.00010559 in the dollar of capital value on all residential rateable rating units in the City.

 

·    A rate of $0.00016895 in the dollar of capital value on all commercial rateable rating units in the City.

 

(b)        That all rates (except the water supply volumetric rate set under section 19 and the water supply base rate for metered connections under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002) be payable in two equal instalments due on:

 

·    31 August 2022 and

·    28 February 2023

 

(c)        That all metered water rates will, except as to high users, be invoiced on a quarterly basis dependant on when the water meters are read, in accordance with the table below headed “Due dates and penalty dates for rates for metered water supply”. The due dates will also be specified on the invoice. Rating units, which are considered high users of water (namely having an average consumption more than 5m3 per day) will be invoiced monthly, and these rates will be due on the first Thursday after 23 days following the date of the invoice.

 

(d)        That the Council authorises the addition of penalties to rates that are not paid by the due date, as follows, in accordance with sections 57 and 58 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, and delegates authority to the Manager Finance to apply penalties in accordance with this regime:

 

(i)         a charge of 10% on so much of any rates instalment after 1 July 2022 which is unpaid after the relevant due date (except for the volumetric rate under section 19 and the water supply base rate for metered connections under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002) will be applied on:

 

Instalment due date

Penalty Date

31 August 2022

9 September 2022

28 February 2023

10 March 2023

 

(i)         a charge of 10% on so much of any of the volumetric rate under section 19 and the water supply base rate for metered connections under section 16 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 invoiced after 1 July 2022 and which is unpaid after the due date will be applied on whichever is the next consecutive date following the due date of the invoice to which the penalty applies, being:

 

Water Penalty Date

27 October 2022

2 February 2023

4 May 2023

27 July 2023

 

 

 

Due dates and penalty dates for rates for metered water supply and connection

Week

Area

Q1 Due date

Q2 Due date

Q3 Due date

Q4 Due date

1

Mt Maunganui North/ Ind, Omanu, Matapihi,

11-Aug-22

11-Nov-22

16-Feb-23

11-May-23

2

Arataki, Te Maunga, Papamoa West

18-Aug-22

10-Nov-22

23-Feb-23

18-May-23

3

Papamoa West / East

25-Aug-22

17-Nov-22

2-Mar-23

25-May-23

4

Papamoa East / South,

1-Sep-22

24-Nov-22

9-Mar-23

1-Jun-23

5

Papamoa East, Kairua, Welcome Bay, Hairini

8-Sep-22

1-Dec-22

16-Mar-23

8-Jun-23

6

Hairini / Ohauiti, Poike, Pyes Pa, Maungatapu.

15-Sep-22

8-Dec-22

23-Mar-23

15-Jun-23

7

Greerton, Yatton Park, Gate Pa, Avenues

22-Sep-22

15-Dec-22

30-Mar-23

22-Jun-23

8

Tauranga Central/South, TeReti, Judea, SulphurPt

29-Sep-22

12-Jan-23

6-Apr-23

29-Jul-23

9

Brookfield, Bellevue, Otumoetai

6-Oct-22

12-Jan-23

13-Apr-23

6-Jul-23

10

Otumoetai, Matua

13-Oct-22

19-Jan-23

20-Apr-23

13-Jul-23

11

The Lakes, Bethlehem

20-Oct-22

26-Jan-23

27-Apr-23

20-Jul-23

All (including high users)

Penalty Added Date

27-Oct-22

02-Feb-23

4-May-23

27-Jul-23

 

(e)        Where a ratepayer makes any payment that is less than the amount now payable, the Council, will apply the payment firstly to any rates outstanding from previous rating years and then proportionately across all current year rates due.

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       To set rates for the 2022/2023 year in accordance with the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 and in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Council's 2021-2031 Long-term Plan, and Funding Impact Statement in the 2022/2023 Annual Plan

Background

3.       The total rates requirement is determined through the Annual Plan.

4.       The total rates increase between the 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 years (excluding water volumetric charges) is 13.7% after adjusting for growth of 1.5%. This is supported by growth in the number of rating units and the increase in capital value.

5.       The median increase for residential ratepayers is 9.2% and the median increase for commercial ratepayers is 24%.

(Includes rating policy changes to the commercial differential on the general rate and the transportation targeted rate, and the introduction of a low and high kerbside waste service)

Strategic / Statutory Context

6.       The rates resolution is required to set and assess the rates.

Consultation / Engagement

7.       The community was consulted through the draft Annual Plan and draft Long Term Plan Amendment.

Significance

8.       The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

9.       In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the matter.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

10.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the decision is of high significance due to the quantum involved and its impact on the community.  This decision affects all Ratepayers of Tauranga City. It is a significant funding source ($231 Million rates revenue and estimated $39 Million water volumetric charge revenue for Council).

Next Steps

11.     Rates will be set and assessed for the 2022/2023 rating year.

 

Attachments

Nil


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

11.4       Adopt Final 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy

File Number:           A13349765

Author:                    Ana Blackwood, Development Contributions Policy Analyst

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       To adopt the final 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Adopts the 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy.

(b)     Delegates to the General Manager: Strategy and Growth the authority to rectify any minor errors or omissions that are identified in the 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy prior to final publication.

 

 Discussion

2.       Council reviews and updates its Development Contributions Policy (DCP) on an annual basis. A draft of the 2022/23 DCP was adopted and consulted on alongside the Long-Term Plan Amendment and Annual Plan process.

3.       16 submissions were received in relation to the draft policy. Responses to those submissions have been approved and the required amendments as a result of those submissions have been made to the policy.

4.       Attachment A is a copy of the proposed Final 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy with all updates. The policy document remains largely the same as the draft DCP. The only changes compared to the draft version that are worth noting are the changes to capex budgets and consequential changes to the development contribution fees.

5.       The table below shows a breakdown of the development contribution levies for each catchment in the draft policy alongside those fees we are proposing to include in the final 2022/23 DCP.

 Catchment

Final 2022/23

Draft 2022/23

Chance since draft

Overall change from current fees

Charge basis

Citywide 

$33,570

$32,754

2.5%, $816

+ 17.6%, $ 5,013

3-bedroom dwelling

Bethlehem

$14,248

$14,443

1.4%

+ 0.4%

 

 

 

 

$ per lot

Ohauiti

$12,883

$12,888

0.0%

- 0.3%

Papamoa

$9,860

$10,035

1.7%

- 1.4%

Pyes Pa

$7,898

$7,901

0.0%

+ 0.2%

Pyes Pa West

$41,357

$41,324

-0.1%

+ 4.5%, $ 1,766

Tauranga Infill

$4,227

$4,227

0.0%

0.0%

Welcome Bay

$10,029

$10,063

0.3%

-  0.1%

West Bethlehem

$34,460

$34,460

0%

+ 6.0%

Tauriko

$402,518

$412,161

-2.3%, $9,642

- 5.0%

$ per hectare

Wairakei B

$491,507

$491,243

0.1%

0.2%

 

6.       The charges in most catchments have moved by small amounts – less than 2%. Movements in many of these cases reflect updates or tweaks to inflation and capital calculations. The fees for Tauriko have increased by 2.3% compared to the draft policy but this is still a 5% decrease in fees overall compared to the operative policy.

7.       The change of most significance remains the increase in Citywide development contributions which have increased a further 2.5% compared to what was consulted on. Details of this increase are set out below.

 

Citywide DC for 3-bedroom dwellings including GST

Movement between policy versions

Overall movement between 2021/22 DCP and 2022/23 DCP

Final 2021/22 DCP

$ 28,557

 

 

Draft 2022/23 DCP

$ 32,754

+ $ 4,197 , + 15%

 

Final 2022/23 DCP

$ 33,570

+ $ 816  , + 2%

+ $ 5,013 , + 18%

 

8.       As shown in the above breakdown we consulted on a 15% increase in the citywide development contribution. The expected overall increase in the citywide development contribution based on the fee set out in the attached final policy is an 18% increase.

9.       The cause of this change is an increase in costs of community infrastructure projects and a further increase in the cost of finalising the Waiari Water Treatment Plant. All of these increases formed part of the internal submissions.

10.     The capex increases have been offset partially by updates to the renewal funding and external grant allocations. These were reviewed in response to external submissions.

Next Steps

11.     Once the policy is adopted staff will arrange for distribution of the final policy to stakeholders and submitters (electronic or printed depending on preference).

12.     Staff also note that we are undertaking further work on funding options including a review of funding for key transportation infrastructure, community facilities and options regarding funding for infrastructure required for intensification. These reviews may lead to further increases in the citywide development contributions (or other contributions) and so staff are developing processes to engage with stakeholders over the potential changes. The submitters and others who engaged in the consultation through this policy will form a base distribution list from which to start future engagement.

Significance AND ENGAGEMENT

13.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

14.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the LTP.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

15.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the DCP is of high significance.   However, given that the policy has already been through a consultation process, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.  

Attachments

1.       Attachment A - Final 2022/23 Development Contributions Policy - A13585595 (Separate Attachments 1)    


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

11.5       2021-31 Long-term Plan Amendment

File Number:           A13528632

Author:                    Josh Logan, Team Leader: Corporate Planning

Kathryn Sharplin, Manager: Finance

Tracey Hughes, Financial Insights & Reporting Manager

Authoriser:             Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       To present the 2021-31 Long-term Plan Amendment for adoption to become the 2021-31 Long-term Plan.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the report.

(b)     Adopts the Amended 2021-31 Long-term Plan (Attachment 1)

(c)     Receives a report from Audit New Zealand confirming its previous opinion on the 2021-31 Long-term Plan as it is now amended, pursuant to section 94 of the Local Government Act 2002.

(d)     Adopts the audited 2021-31 Amended Long Term Plan pursuant to section 93 of the Local Government Act 2002.

(e)     Authorises the Chief Executive to make any necessary minor drafting or presentation amendments to the 2021-31 amended LTP prior to final publishing.

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) section 93 (4) enables a local authority to amend its Long-term Plan (LTP) at any time. 

3.       Council has consulted on these amendments through the special consultative procedure required by the LGA to reach decisions on the amendments to the LTP.  The deliberations report on the Long-Term Plan Amendment Deliberations was received by Council on 24 May 2022 and was the basis of the Council decisions incorporated in this Long-term Plan Amendment. 

4.       The highlighted amendments attached to this report (Attachment 1) have been incorporated in the 2021-31 LTP document, which is also attached in full.

5.       Audit New Zealand has audited the amendments to the LTP document pursuant to section 94 of the LGA. This report recommends that Council receive the audit opinion and subsequently adopt the final audited amended 2021-31 LTP.

6.       Following adoption of the LTP, this document will be available on Council’s website. There will also be ‘reference only’ copies available at Council offices to replace the original 2021-31 LTP.

DISCUSSION

7.       The Audited 2021-31 Long-term Plan was adopted in accordance with the LGA on 26 July 2021.

8.       Subsequently, a project was initiated to consider issues and opportunities in relation to the civic precinct masterplan - Te Manawataki O Te Papa. This project included an amendment to the 2021-31 LTP to allow for decisions in relation to development of the civic campus.

9.       Also included in the amendment was the decision to explore alternative funding arrangements for some projects identified in the Western Bay of Plenty Transport System Plan (TSP) and the Tauriko West development using the Infrastructure Funding and Financing Act 2020 (IFF).

10.     Council consulted in accordance with the special consultative procedure required by the LGA on a proposed amendment to the 2021-31 LTP. The consultation document was titled “Its time.”

11.     The deliberations report 11.3 Long-term Plan Amendment Deliberations - Civic Precinct Issues and Options was received by Council on 24 May 2022 and was the basis of the Council decisions incorporated in this Long-term Plan Amendment (LTPA).  The report set out the history of the consultation and decision-making processes that were undertaken in accordance with the LGA. 

12.     Also, part of deliberations on 24 May 2022, Council made decisions to include as part of this amendment the two IFF proposals consulted on with the public for the identified TSP projects and Tauriko West growth area infrastructure.

13.     The final amended 2021-31 LTP differs slightly from the proposed LTPA supporting the consultation document due to adjustments to the detail of civic precinct capital projects and consequential impacts on funding assumptions and operational costs. Although total estimated costs of the civic precinct remain as consulted on, there have been changes to timing of civic projects and allocation of cost amongst projects within the programme.

14.     The key changes from the original 2021-31 LTP are highlighted in Attachment 1.  They are in the following sections of the LTP:

(i)      Introduction

(ii)     Groups of Activities

(iii)     Financial Strategy

(iv)    Finance

15.     There have been no changes to the following key sections of the LTP as a consequence of this amendment:

(i)      Infrastructure Strategy

(ii)     Policies

(iii)     Significant Forecasting Assumptions

16.     The amended 2021-31 LTP is included as Attachment 2.

Strategic / Statutory Context

17.     The development of the LTPA contributes to all the community outcomes identified in the 2021-31 LTP.

Consultation / Engagement

18.     This matter was consulted on with the community using the special consultative procedure of the LGA.

19.     No further consultation will be undertaken unless it is necessary to progress individual projects within the plan.

Significance

20.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a high degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

21.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the decision.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

22.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the decision is of high significance.

ENGAGEMENT

23.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the decision is of high significance, officers are of the opinion that no further engagement is required prior to Council making a decision.

Next Steps

24.     Following adoption of the LTP, this document will be available on Council’s website. There will also be ‘reference only’ copies available at Council offices to replace the original 2021-31 LTP.

Attachments

1.       LTPA 2021-2031 - Highlighted - A13586159 (Separate Attachments 2)  

2.       LTP 2021-2031 - A13586161 (Separate Attachments 2)    


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

11.6       Executive Report

File Number:           A13549894

Author:                    Nic Johansson, General Manager: Infrastructure

Barbara Dempsey, Acting General Manager: Community Services

Paul Davidson, General Manager: Corporate Services

Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

Tony Aitken, Acting General Manager: People and Engagement

Steve Pearce, Acting General Manager: Regulatory and Compliance

Gareth Wallis, General Manager: Central City Development

Authoriser:             Marty Grenfell, Chief Executive

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       To provide updates on key projects and activities.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Executive Report.

 

 

Infrastructure Group

Strategic Procurement Project – Delivering Better Outcomes

2.       The strategic procurement review of how we can work more effectively with our key supply partners has moved into a more formal project execution phase. We have titled this project ‘Delivering Better Outcomes’ and engaged Arup as a strategic procurement SME to lead and work with us in delivering the targeted benefits and outcomes that will aid in the efficient delivery of the LTP capital works plan.

3.       We have initiated a series of two-hour roundtable sessions with key contractors and design consultants in June, to have a more intimate conversation on our strategic procurement approach and to hear how these key supply partners would prefer to engage with us to help de-risk the delivery of projects and achieve broader outcomes. The insights from these sessions will help shape the market procurement process that will follow over the coming months, leading to potential new delivery models in late-2022/early-2023.

Maunganui Road Safety Improvements

4.       Maunganui Road is a local road and we’re aiming to create a calmer, safer environment for everyone who uses it. The design of lanes and roundabouts will encourage cars to naturally reduce their speed and work includes safer biking facilities, pedestrian crossing points, new roundabouts and more greenery in centre strips.

5.       Golf Road to Tui Street - The team has finished paths and kerbs alongside the College, as well as the roundabout at Tui Street, allowing the southbound lane of Maunganui Road to be reopened on 10 June.

6.       During construction, a number of underground issues were found, including clashes and variations in depths or location for services (gas/water/electricity), which needed to be solved or accommodated via a redesign of the construction plan.  This has held work up at times and extended the impacts on traffic and residents.  The team has worked closely with residents in the area to understand the local priorities and nightshifts were established to speed things up as much as possible.

A picture containing sky, outdoor, road, way

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7.       Hinau Street to Sutherland Avenue - We are currently undertaking works to renew kerbs and pavement, install drainage infrastructure and prepare for the reconfiguration of intersections. Over the coming months, roundabouts will be constructed at Sutherland Avenue, Matai Street and Hinau Street, which will impact traffic flows and parking in the area. Work is scheduled to be completed ahead of the summer season.

Matakokiri Drive to Lakes Boulevard - wastewater and watermains pipelines

8.       New wastewater and watermain pipelines are being installed to the Tauriko Business Estate, between Matakokiri Drive and Lakes Boulevard.  This work is required to provide water services to the new development in the Estate.

9.       The project will be delivered in two stages:

·        Stage 1 works have started in the Tauriko Business Park, along Matakokiri Drive and Kaweroa Drive;

·        Stage 2 works are expected to start in mid-2022 and will connect pipelines from Lakes Boulevard to Awataha Reserve.

10.     Below is a map of the extent of the project:

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Preparation for stage 2:  Stage 2 works are planned to start in mid-2022. In preparation, our contractor, GT Civil, will set-up a work site in the Awataha Reserve. Preparation of the site will include establishing an access road and work area within the reserve, for the delivery and welding of pipes on-site.

Esmeralda Reserve and Owens Park Restoration Upgrade

11.     The construction of a flood protection wall has been successfully completed in the Esmeralda Reserve, to help protect neighbouring residents and property from potential flood risks during extreme storm events.  The Esmeralda Street flood reduction work included the construction of a floodwall using Redi-Rock, reinforcement of stream banks and the realignment of the stream to better manage water flows during heavy rain.

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12.     More recently, the focus moved across the street to Owens Park for the riparian planting of 4000 specimens along the stream to Welcome Bay Road. Tamariki from the local school and kindergarten helped with the stream-edge planting and learned about the cultural relevance of the stream and the area around their school.

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Community Services

Arts and Culture

13.     The Incubator has recently opened the Community Cinema at the Historic Village. The cinema has received excellent feedback from the general public, as well as local film sector practitioners, and has been well-utilised since opening. The opening programme included screenings for the Pride Festival, Matariki Festival, and a series of filmmaker talks and forums. The Incubator is currently delivering its largest-ever contribution to Tauranga’s Matariki Festival, with eight exhibitions and twelve workshops alongside a programme of music, markets and artist talks. The Matariki programme launch included the public announcement of the Incubator’s new Whakairo carving centre, which will open in the fire station at the Historic Village. This initiative will bring together a range of acclaimed local Whakairo carvers, giving the community an opportunity to view carvers working, learn about the tools and processes used in this artform, and learn the history and stories of local iwi, told through carving. The new centre has been gifted the name “Te Whare Toi O Te Moana” and will open to the public in July.

Community Partnerships

14.     We have now confirmed continuing support from Acorn Foundation, BayTrust and TECT as partners in the Vital Update: Tauranga work programme.  A series of workshops will commence in July to review the Vital Update question sets and priority population groups.  Further conversations are planned to confirm direction for the work programme with Iwi partners.

15.     We have continued to scope the Tauranga Child Wellbeing Study and have now met with the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, Ministry of Social Development, Ministry of Youth Development, Statistics New Zealand, the Social Wellbeing Agency, Taituarā, LGNZ, and the Department of Internal Affairs.  All agencies have confirmed their interest in the Tauranga Child Wellbeing Study and have agreed to continue contributions to project design.  Overall, feedback has indicated that there is a clear gap in national wellbeing data for children aged under 12 years and that the proposed Tauranga study is of national interest for replication across the country.  A literature review and initial scoping document is due by the end of June and the work programme is now progressing into Stage Two: Project Design.

16.     The Community Partnerships team hosted a visit by Meng Foon, Race Relations Commissioner, and Human Rights Commission Advisors on 16 May.  The visit included meeting with staff working in diversity and inclusion, Commissioners, tangata whenua representatives and an afternoon hui with community stakeholders.  The visit provided an opportunity to discuss concerns about racism (as recently reported by local media), council’s role in addressing racism in Tauranga Moana, and opportunities to partner with the Human Rights Commission to support work and identify actions.

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17.     Unfortunately, we were unable to hold the Global Ambassadors - Te Kete Wananga on 27 May at Whareroa Marae (due to Covid-19) with the Te Pou Takawaenga Unit, but we were able to continue with hosting an inspiring group of young women based in Auckland, of Somali cultural heritage.  The group of young leaders, through E Tu Whanau, travelled from Auckland to connect with the participants of the Tauranga/Western Bay Global Ambassadors youth programme, which is supported by Welcoming Communities, undertake a water safety education session at Ara Rau, and participate in leadership development activities.  This very talented group included some who have never travelled outside of Auckland previously.  They loved Tauranga (although it was a bit too quiet for some of them).

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18.     Kainga Tupu teamed with up with NZ Police to deliver a De-escalation workshop to our homeless community providers. We had a great turnout of approximately 60 providers and have received positive feedback on how this type of training supports and improves how they do things in our community. As this was so popular, we are looking to organise a second workshop later in the year. Further training opportunities are also being investigated to educate our providers in applying for funding through a range of different sources, enabling them to lead and drive meaningful initiatives and achieve positive outcomes for our community.

          The Grants Assessment Panel met on 2 June and approved seven Match Fund Grant applications totalling $70,000.  The successful applications are:

Organisation

Project

Amount

Bay of Plenty Down Syndrome Association

Supporting practice for inclusion

$10,000

Pacific Island Community (Tauranga) Trust (umbrella)

Tamou Te Uki Ou

$10,000

Trees for Survival Trust

Planting for change

$10,000

Tauranga Living Without Violence Collective Trust

Developing a youth-specific programme

$10,000

Tauranga Regional Multicultural Council (umbrella)

Hundred Tigers Project

$10,000

Opus Orchestra Trust

2022 Concert series in Tauranga

$10,000

Volunteer Western BOP

To be finalised

$10,000

 

Emergency Management

19.     Marae Preparedness - The Emergency Management team has confirmed council’s contribution and support for resourcing the emergency planning and marae preparedness plan for Tamapahore Marae. The team is continuing to work with marae trustees on sourcing required items, with approximately half having been procured thus far. The Emergency Management team also supported an application to Te Puni Kōkiri to enable further big-ticket items/resources to be purchased, which has been successful.

20.     Exercise Parawhenua Mea - BOP CDEM held a Civil Defence Emergency Management exercise on 30 May and 2 June for our Emergency Operations Centre staff.  63 staff from throughout council participated in the exercise, which was based on a Tsunami hitting our coastline following a large earthquake near Samoa.  CDEM is the lead agency in the emergency response to a Tsunami event and as such, is required to coordinate a response.  This exercise was a good opportunity to shake-out processes, test the facilities and refresh staff on their roles and responsibilities in a controlled environment.  The exercise was a success in terms of building confidence in our capability and has helped identify gaps for continuous improvement.

21.     Tsunami Preparedness - The existing tsunami evacuation zones, routes and safe locations are all currently under review as part of a Bay of Plenty tsunami evacuation review. This will result in a more consistent approach to the way tsunami evacuation maps are created, as well as more consistent messaging for everything tsunami-related in the Bay of Plenty. The TCC Emergency Management team is working closely with BOP CDEM Group and councils to assist in delivering this project.

22.     Mount Industrial Zone - The Mount Industrial Zone Emergency Management Review project is now in stage 2. This stage is focused around assessing the risks associated with each major hazard facility and understanding the potential offsite impacts. This will enable emergency planning for events that may impact multiple facilities simultaneously. A GIS platform will be created later this year to display and store the findings from this project for rapid reference during a response.

Libraries

23.     The last six weeks have seen large staff shortages due to Covid isolation.  Other winter illnesses, a difficult recruitment market and casual staff leaving for other employment has exacerbated the difficulties.  All four libraries have been closed for full or half days due to lack of staffing and the impact on service levels has been felt by the community.  Recruitment is underway for several vacancies.

24.     There have been many special visitors to He Puna Manawa and weekday visitor numbers are around 700 per day, close to what was being seen at the Willow Street site.  One very emotional visit was from the kaumatua from Whaioranga Trust.  Not only were the kaumatua blown away with what we have on offer, but they made special mention of the building design, the people and how welcome they felt. They thoroughly enjoyed seeing Pae Korokī and even featured in some of the images.  They found the access to services such as streaming and digital training amazing too, and the fact that all services are free. This was the first-ever visit to a library for some of the kaumatua, due to generational bad experiences in school and public services. Being welcomed and spoken to in Te Reo Māori, and having that kaupapa Māori, was so important for them.

Spaces and Places

          Construction on the first stage of the Pyes Pa Connections Cycleway linking Cheyne Road to Condor Drive is now complete.  Preconstruction planning is now underway on Stage two, which connects the stormwater reserve in Cheyne Road to the cycleway network.

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25.     The Mauao placemaking project is on track to deliver a new celestial compass as part of the Matariki celebrations.  Work has been undertaken on the summit of Mauao to prepare the site for installation of the compass.  

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          Fabrication of a new boardwalk and bridge structure to link Eden Crescent to Gordon Carmichael Reserve is well underway, with the structure on-track to be installed in late-June/early-July.

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          Work has progressed on the Te Ranga Landscape project, with a bund being constructed along the site boundary with State Highway 36. The bund will be planted as part of a community planting day in June.  This is the first stage in a larger project to restore the reserve.  Work will involve a Waharoa, Tomokanga, carpark, walkway and signage.

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26.     We continue to work on divestment of Council’s Elder Housing portfolio. We have now moved the last tenants out of Pitau Road village and will start the demolition of the remaining blocks at Pitau Road next month. The remaining five tenants will be relocated from Hinau Village at the end of June, in preparation for the sales process of these two villages. With a total of 44 residents moved over the past year, it is great to see happy tenants and positive comments from tenants and their families. We are working with colleagues from across Council to transition the remaining seven villages to Kaingā Ora.

27.     A wide variety of renewals and minor capital projects are underway and/or have been recently completed by the Spaces & Places team, including:

(a)     Te Ara O Wairakei – Stage 2 Planting starts mid-June with 15,000 plants expected to go in the ground. Commissioner Tolley will open the works on 22 June by planting the first tree;

(b)     On 13 May, Students of Te Akau Ki Papamoa Primary were joined by Dr Paul Salmon of the Skin Cancer Clinic to plant 80 Pohutukawa along Papamoa Beach Road. This will increase the biodiversity within the dunes and over time, these trees will provide shade for beach users;

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(c)     The planting season is in full-swing, with more than ten community planting events scheduled across the next three months.  It is expected that ~50,000 plants will be planted by the community across Tauranga Moana this season.

(d)     Coast Care BOP will be holding 1-2 public planting days each month over winter, continuing their efforts to restore our beautiful dunes.  For more information on Coast Care BOP’s planting events, follow them on Facebook.  https://www.facebook.com/CoastCareBayofPlenty

Venues and Events

28.     Tauranga hosted the first game of the World Rugby Pacific Four Series on 6 June, with 2,430 fans turning out despite the wet weather.  Two international women’s games were played, Canada versus the United States, followed by New Zealand (The Black Ferns) versus Australia.  The event was hosted at Tauranga Domain and the Spaces and Places and Building teams worked tirelessly to ensure the refurbished grandstand was useable in time. Hosting an event of this calibre is a huge win for our city, with approximately 160 athletes and their supporters filling two hotels, utilising local services, and visiting schools in the region.

29.     Zespri AIMS Games takes place from 3-9 September this year, after a two-year hiatus due to COVID-19.  Once again, Tauranga City Council is a major partner, and a significant amount of work will take place to leverage the event and ensure our community and visitors have an exceptional experience.  Almost 11,000 athletes from 320 schools across New Zealand have registered for the games, which typically bring approximately 20,000 visitors to the Western Bay of Plenty.

30.     The Kaupapa Māori Legacy Event Fund will open for applications on 1 July 2022.  Run by council’s Takawaenga Māori Unit, with support from the Venues and Events team, the fund is designed to support recurring events that celebrate Māori culture in Tauranga.  From 1 July, BayTrust will join Tauranga City Council and TECT Community Trust as a partner, increasing the fund from $65,000 to $90,000.

31.     In late-May, the Te Wharekura o Mauao and Tuatara Collective unveiled their 2022 bilingual theatre extravaganza, Mataatua, at Baycourt Community & Arts Centre. Audience feedback received by the Baycourt team was positive and the show’s popularity was also reflected in ticket sales, with three of the five shows selling-out.  Baycourt’s event activity remains limited this reporting period however, as a long-term by-product of COVID-19. There is a focus on reducing operating expenses where possible, while ensuring the level of service is not compromised. Event bookings are expected to start trending upwards in the second quarter of 2022/23.

32.     Staff hosted an industry workshop on 31 May focused on genuine Māori engagement in event planning, which was attended by over 40 senior professionals from across the region. Carlo Ellis, Manager: Strategic Māori Engagement, covered the core principles and guidelines for Māori engagement. These events are designed to develop relationships and upskill the Tauranga events industry, and more regular workshops will take place now COVID-19 restrictions have eased.  

Corporate Services

33.     Tauranga City Council featured prominently in the annual Association of Local Government Information Management awards, which were announced at the association conference in Wellington this month. Our Three Waters Collaboration project (in conjunction with the Western Bay of Plenty District Council) won the Digital Project of the Year Award and Enterprise IM Manager Donna Officer received the Information Management Professional of the Year Award. TCC’s Long-term Plan process was also a finalist in its category, and we achieved ‘excellent’ ratings in the website and customer service award categories.

Tauranga Airport and Vessel Works operational activities

Vessel Works – Marine Precinct

34.     In mid-May, the BOPRC Harbour Master removed 28m3 of oil, fuel, and black water off two high-risk vessels. The removal of this fluid significantly reduces the environmental risk these vessels present.

35.     Planning for the demolition of the highest-risk vessel is well underway, and we are close to implementing a contract.

36.     A marine surveyor inspected the lower-risk vessel and deemed it “derelict”. The owner has been given a month to remove the vessel from the water. Failure of the owner to act will force the BOPRC to seize, remove and demolish the vessel.

37.     Due to outstanding debts, we have started the process of seizing and selling one of the long-term vessels.

 

Tauranga Airport

38.     Air New Zealand continues to grow capacity back to pre-COVID levels, with strong International and Domestic bookings going forward. Over May and April, Air New Zealand operated 1,739 flights with a total of 76,406 passengers travelling, which was 84% of pre-COVID capacity.

39.     Work is continuing in developing a staged plan for further at-grade public and rental car parking, rather than multi-level. This will require the relocation of the Airport’s Fire Station, power and lighting centre and an area of general aviation taxi way.


 

Digital

40.     Digital continues to be heavily impacted by supply chain disruptions and resourcing availability. 

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Programme forward plan:

41.     The digital team continues to work with the wider organisation to move from our legacy technology environment to a modern environment that supports the needs of our organisation.

42.     Our SAP finance platform upgrade was successfully completed at the end of May. The upgrade has put the programme into a great position where it can now start focusing on moving from a design and prototyping phase to the migration of our ‘customer and contact data’ from Ozone to our core SAP platform.

43.     In parallel, planning for the establishment of the new property model design in SAP will commence, with TCC Leased Property processes becoming a priority once the ‘Customer and Contact data’ has been successfully migrated and is stable. 

44.     The customer and property foundational work above will provide the building blocks for our customer, property and revenue-related business processes to be migrated from Ozone onto our core SAP platform.

45.     Initial iterations of implementing resource planning, specifically managing the resource consent process, have been successfully completed, with the support of the Environmental Planning team. The focus now is for the teams to iron out any issues, enhance the process and pivot where necessary to ensure business needs are being met.

46.     The coming month will also see the Digital and HR teams start planning for the modernisation of our HR Information Systems.

 

Leveraging a bird’s eye view

47.     The digital team has been out in the field supporting many of the organisation’s projects through the use of our drone capability. This gives projects the ability to provide real life visual views of our current and future projects, to support planning, engagement, consultation and design. Raw footage has been captured to support key projects including:

(a)     Otumoetai Spatial Plan: providing visual reference of where commercial centres are in relation to planning zones.

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(c)    
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Kopurererua Valley Resource Restoration: footage has been captured several times throughout the project to demonstrate how the construction programme is evolving.

 

Our evolving City and visual story telling

48.     The digital team has been updating our 3D aerial imagery. The new imagery allows us to show our evolving city by comparing previous year visuals. The new 3D aerial imagery also provides significantly improved image quality and detail. Our 3D imagery is an important tool for use in planning, community engagement and visual storytelling. The recent imagery was used to support Priority One’s CBD Blueprint launch video. It has also been used for Tsunami impact visualisations and building height analysis for planning.

49.     Our drone is also a key tool in our visual storytelling arsenal, allowing us to capture new and updated footage of our city as it evolves and in between our annual aerial captures.

50.    
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The below imagery shows an example of 2016 vs 2022 of the Farmers site.

Strategy and Growth

51.     Most of the matters associated with the Strategy & Growth portfolio are reported directly to Council, the Strategy, Finance & Risk Committee, or through the separate regular update reports on Growth and Transport.  Rather than duplicate those reports, only current matters not addressed through other reporting will be included in the Executive Report.  There are no additional matters to report within this Executive Report.

People and Engagement

Community Relations

52.     The Media Impact Score (MIS) for April and May was 1.4 and 1.3 respectively. Anti-central government sentiment highlighted by by-election activities, safety concerns around bus stations, gang violence and criticism of the Links Ave fines contributed to the lower MIS scores. There was still significant positive coverage around the Civic Precinct decision and other major investments in the city, as well as council's support for local recreational and cultural works, and economic improvements.

53.     Community Relations staff continue to support important projects across the council, including exploring new digital engagement products, for example a virtual engagement room for Building our future - Cameron Road, Te Papa and the use of Social Pinpoint on the Ōtūmoetai Spatial Plan. We’ve also been seeking community feedback on the Marine Education and Research facility, Tauriko for Tomorrow and the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan and Bylaw review. 

Te Pou Takawaenga

54.     Matariki 2022

In June, we saw the most comprehensive Matariki calendar thus far, in-line with the national holiday making its debut. The month was launched with Te Mātahi o te Tau - a special walk up Mauao, which saw 80+ people paying tribute to their loved ones who have passed this year (see pictures below).  Workshops providing a range of cultural experiences for people from all walks of life have made for a truly inclusive programme.  

Rangapū responses to Three Waters Working Party Report 

55.     A special workshop was held to work through the 46 Working Party recommendations and provide responses to each one. Essentially, Rangapū advises there are seven key principles to be applied throughout the reform process: 

(a)     Ensure the Three Waters Reforms give effect to the Principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in all aspects and at all levels – Recommendations 3, 7-14, 19, 31-35, 40-45;

(b)     Ensure regionalisation takes proper account of natural Māori alliances – Recommendations 20, 25, 30;

(c)     Discharge to whenua is more appropriate than discharge to wai – Recommendation 44 - and we expect further detail should support this as more information emerges; 

(d)     Protect kaitiakitanga – iwi and hapū must be supported to maintain guardianship over their taonga (which includes associated flora and fauna), but also that we protect the integrity of the reforms – Recommendations 10-18, 20, 24, 30, 33, 44, 46; 

(e)     Prioritise supporting the utilisation of Māori land in the delivery of infrastructure, now and into the future - Recommendation 44 - and we expect further detail should support this as more information emerges; 

(f)      Plan for better alignment with the natural form and function of the taiao – Recommendations 2 & 44 - and we expect further detail should support this as more information emerges; 

(g)     That the 3WR must support the implementation of Te Mana o te Wai in all aspects – Recommendations 36-39. 

Democracy Services

56.     The Local Electoral Amendment Bill going through parliament will remove the need for local government election candidates to display a physical address on advertising. The law change would enable other options such as an email address, post office box or phone number to be displayed. The Bill is expected to be passed in time for the upcoming local body nominations, due to open on 15 July 2022. The change was recommended and supported by Local Government New Zealand, as many candidates were publicising their home addresses and could face undue risk to their physical safety. 

57.     Justice Minister Kris Faafoi announced on 9 June 2022 that the Māori Electoral Option will be changed to allow Māori voters to switch electoral rolls at any time. The bill is expected to be introduced to the House in the coming weeks. On the same day, Rawiri Waititi, Māori Party Co-Leader, had his bill drawn from the Member’s Bill ballot entitled “Electoral (Right to Switch Rolls Freely) Amendment Bill”.  This Bill would amend the Electoral Act 1993 to enable Māori voters to switch between the Māori and non-Māori electoral rolls at any time. This issue is also traversed in an Electoral (Strengthening Democracy) Bill in the name of Golriz Ghahraman, which is waiting for a first reading. The Māori Electoral Option is a four-month period held every 5-6 years, within which Māori voters can choose to move between the general or Māori electoral rolls. It last took place in 2018, and under the current rules, Māori will not have the opportunity to change rolls until after the 2023 General Election. The Ministry of Justice undertook targeted engagement on the Māori Electoral Option in mid-2021, to which the Council made a submission. Issues with the timing and frequency of the Māori Electoral Option have been repeatedly raised in reports by the Justice Select Committee and the Electoral Commission. The Minister stated in his media release that “The feedback from the engagement overwhelmingly supported a shift to a continuous model to remove the restrictions on Māori voters’ electoral rights. The current restrictions on timing and frequency of the Option are unjustified, unfair, and often difficult to understand.” While the law change will allow Māori voters to change rolls at any time, there will be an exception preventing voters from switching rolls to vote in by-elections. 

58.     Michael Webster has been appointed as the new Privacy Commissioner, starting on 5 July, and replaces John Edwards, who is now the United Kingdom’s Privacy Commissioner. Mr Webster is the current Secretary of the Cabinet and has worked in the Cabinet Office, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet, for the last 13 years, He has been the Secretary of the Cabinet and Clerk of the Executive Council since March 2014.  

59.     On 17 June 2022, the Epidemic Preparedness Notice was extended to 16 September 2022.  This extended the Epidemic Preparedness (COVID-19) Notice 2020 (the Principal Notice) and several amendments relevant to local government remain while the Principal Notice is in force. These relate to attending council and committee meetings via audio or visual link and enable those who attend remotely to be counted towards the quorum of meetings. It also enables meetings to be open to the public through online access; and for meeting agendas, reports, and minutes to be posted on council websites rather than in physical locations. There are other provisions that enable various actions to occur remotely via audio/visual link, such as new members taking oaths of office, rates rebates, statutory declarations and Order in Council mechanisms to enable changes to by-election timing. 

Human Resources

60.     Staff Turnover is calculated on a 12-month rolling basis.  It is now remaining steady at a level that compares well against other Councils.  Our aspirational staff turnover range is 10-12%. 

61.     The Remuneration project implementation is on track and about to move into the annual salary review process, which will deliver the outcomes of the project. 

62.     Both Collective Employment Agreements are in the negotiation stage with the PSA. 

63.     Sick leave is a key indicator of staff wellbeing.  The graph below shows a spike reflecting the Covid peak in recent months and that the sick leave level is now back at more typical levels.

Customer Services

64.     Planning is now underway for the Service Centre to relocate to the new civic precinct complex on Willow Street (Te Manawataki o Te Papa) in 2025, as part of the Community Hub.

65.     LIM application numbers remain high in the face of a national downturn in the property market.  During May 2022, application numbers were 2% higher than for the corresponding period last year

Health & Safety

66.     Congratulations to our City Waters team, who were announced as finalists for the Safeguard Health and Safety awards for 2022. They were nominated under the Innovation award ‘Anthony Harper best use of innovative New Zealand design or technology to eliminate or manage a risk’. A group of staff attended the awards gala dinner to celebrate everyone's success.  

67.     The Health and Safety team led a workshop with the Mt Maunganui library team, mobile library, and a Human Resources representative. The focus of the workshop continues our work around better workplace design and was centred around communication methodologies and how to bring out the best in teamwork. 

Regulatory and Compliance

Environmental Regulation

Regulation Monitoring

68.     Enforcement of the Links Ave Bus Lanes continues. To date, over 11,800 infringements have been issued to vehicles illegally using a bus lane since enforcement commenced on 11 April. Of these infringements, over 2,400 have been waived, mostly for first-time offences. Compliance is beginning to improve with an approximately two-thirds reduction in offending since the enforcement began.

69.     The Parking team has successfully recruited two new Parking Officers, but several vacancies have still to be filled.

70.     Our bylaws officers continue to address increasing levels of homelessness in our city, as the number of people rough-sleeping on the street or in vehicles continues to grow. Bylaws Officers continue to work closely with the Police, internal stakeholders, MSD and other support agencies to support these individuals and address issues raised by the community.

Environmental Health

71.     An updated digital food Verification Report template is currently being developed by the Digital Team and is expected to streamline the process significantly. This is on-track to be finalised and operational by end of July.

72.     Our quarterly internal review of the “Food Quality Management System” was completed on 24 May by our internal auditor.  The focus of this review was addressing the three non-conformances identified by external auditor IANZ.   The audit showed good progress is being made to resolve all three matters.

73.     The Environmental Health Team has successfully completed recruitment for an Environmental Health Team Leader, Environmental Health Officer and Health Technician.

74.     In May, the team completed 41 verifications and inspections of food business premises, as well as receiving and processing 45 food registration applications.

Alcohol Licensing

75.     May was another busy month for the team, with 113 licensing applications coming in to be assessed and 94 applications being inquired into and reported on, for submission to the District Licensing Committee.

76.     Licensing Inspectors visited 10 premises during high-risk trading times (after 8pm). Levels of compliance were generally good. However, at one sports bar, our inspectors found that there was no ‘duty manager’ present onsite (this is a requirement under the Act). As a result, we have applied to the Alcohol Regulatory Licensing Authority (ARLA) to have the duty manager’s certificate suspended for 28 days and have issued a $250 infringement to the license holder.

77.     We will be holding our second Alcohol Licensing industry forum specifically-focused on clubs that hold alcohol licences, with the aim of providing them with support and guidance on the issues they are facing. The forum has been set down for 22 June at 6.00pm to give operators who work during the day the opportunity to attend.

Animal Services

78.    

It’s that time of the year for dog owners to renew dog registrations (the current registrations expire on 30 June). To mark this event, we have upgraded our vehicle fleet to reflect the new registration tag colour for the 2022/2023 year – “Has your dog gone GREEN?”. Emails and letters have been dispatched to more than 13,000 owners of 15,247 dogs which are known to Council. By mid-June, nearly 2,500 dogs had already been registered, which is a great start.

 

79.     Since 1 July 2021, over half a million dog poops have been scooped using bags from our 40 dispensers, which are located at various parks and beach accessways across the city.

80.     One of our essential roles is to reunite lost dogs with their owners, so far this year 53 registered dogs which had no history of roaming were returned to their owners without cost. In addition, an additional 377 dogs which were initially impounded were either returned to their owners once we managed to identify them, adopted by a new forever home (29 dogs were adopted). A key message for our community is: “Ensure your dog is registered and microchipped and the microchip is recorded with Council, to ensure a quick return of your dog.”

Building Services

81.     The volume of building consent applications received in May (250) is close to the monthly average for the past three years. However, May is typically a busy month and this number is less than were received in May 2019 and 2021, which could signal a slight plateauing of consent numbers. Certainly 2021 was a bumper year and building consent volumes are down this year by comparison.

 

82.     We granted 287 consents and amendments in May. This is higher than for the past six months and is more than May 2020 and May 2021. A significant effort has been made to reduce the backlog of consents, and the increased output reflects that.

83.     Despite that increased output, compliance with statutory timeframes has remained low with 43% of consents and amendments being issued in 20 working days in May. This is an improvement from a low of 35% in April, and we expect this to continue improving.

 

84.     Our recruitment programme is progressing well and we are approaching zero vacancies – although noting that this includes 11 trainee BCOs who won’t be able to process or inspect consents unsupervised until the end of the year, at the earliest.

85.     In the meantime, to deal with the backlog of applications, we have also contracted an additional 12 external BCOs from a number of different companies. At present, nearly two thirds of applications are being processed externally.

86.     Inspection wait times for standard 45-minute inspections have decreased to 1-2 days for the most part, but the wait time for final inspections (which take approximately 3 hours) has extended to a maximum of 2 – 4 weeks (higher complexity has longer waiting time).

Environmental Planning

87.     While the number of building consents reviewed has remained relatively low in comparison to last year, there has been an increase from March. The opposite has been the case with resource consent applications received. Following a high in February, the number of applications received has reduced since then, despite a slight increase in May.

 

Resource Consent Applications Received:

88.     We will be losing two Senior Environmental Planners at the end of the month.  Recruiting planners is always challenging, but even more so at this level.  We are actively advertising roles and investigating other recruiting options.

89.     Our Environmental Planners have recently been focusing on continual improvement initiatives, such as refreshing our decision templates and conducting team training on concepts of proportionality and conciseness.

90.     There have been ongoing enquiries about whether the provisions of the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act, passed into law on 20 December 2021, can be applied prior to 20 August 2022. We recently shared legal advice with our customers on how we are processing those applications already submitted. Applications can only be processed under the current provisions as the new provisions only have legal effect from 20 August.

91.     The Development Engineering team is currently on top of referrals with applications coming in steadily this month.  Applications in May were exactly the same as last year, with 21 consents received for engineering assessment.

92.     It has been another busy month for the Development Contribution Advisors team, with 166 building consents assessed for development contributions in May. The team is seeing more complex developments coming through, such as multi-unit developments, rather than the standard 3-bedroom consents. The calculation of DC revenue in May is approximately $1.7m on building consents. The team has also been collaborating closely with the policy team to provide feedback and improvement suggestions in relation to the DC Policy.

93.     The team has also commenced a new trial for online applications for Resource Consents. Seven external consultancies are taking part in the pilot and providing feedback on the process, which will run until 15 July.

94.     Environmental Monitoring incidents rose again in May, with 33 incidents reported. The team managed to resolve 28 incidents this month, including 11 that were deemed 'Unconfirmed/Unsubstantiated'.  There are a total of 28 unresolved incidents for this financial year, as of the end of May 2022. 

95.     Eighty-nine individual Resource Consents were monitored in May, resulting in a total of 109 individual monitoring activities. This is a positive trend, showing how the team is managing to dedicate more time to monitoring RC consent conditions, which should reduce incidents in the long term.

96.     Noise incidents also rose this month, with 27 incidents being reported – the biggest issue being residential noise.  Our Noise Vibration Specialist is currently monitoring Port noise and recently presented results findings to a range of stakeholders at the Port Noise Liaison Group Meeting on 2 June.

97.     Most of the Monitoring team visited the Takitimu North Link sites in May for an overview of the project.  This is a huge operation, including a vast amount of earthworks (~3 million cubic metres), tunnelling and new bridges and it was great to see it first hand.

 

 

All of the Environmental Planning team took part in training with Lance Burdett recently. This included how specific, measurable Resource Consent conditions can positively affect environmental monitoring outcomes and managing challenging situations. The team took a lot away from these valuable training sessions.

City Development And partnerships

City Partnerships

98.     Staff are working on a high-level assessment of external funding options for the Te Manawataki O Te Papa Civic Precinct projects, which will be presented to the Commissioners later this month.

99.     Attached is a copy of the latest Bay Venues Quarterly Report relating to Quarter 3 (Jan-Mar 2022). The move back into orange level Covid Protection Framework settings has seen business return and Bay Venues has seen a significant improvement in trading conditions, as would be expected with facilities now being open for events and activities, largely without any restrictions in place.

100.   Staff have provided feedback to the draft annual plans received from the four mainstreet organisations (Mount Business Association, Greerton Village, Papamoa Unlimited and Downtown Tauranga). Final copies of annual plans, incorporating TCC feedback, are due on 30 June 2022.

Civic Redevelopment

101.   91 Willow Street was handed over to LT McGuinness (the developers) on 12 May. An official farewell with approximately 60 staff, mana whenua and representatives from LT McGuinness came together to share stories of the past and excitement for the future development of the site.

102.   On 13 June, the downtown bus terminal was moved from Willow Street to Durham Street. Security fencing has been extended into the bus parks on Wharf Street to allow for the removal of the Willow Street building veranda, which will start in approximately two weeks’ time.

KiwiRail underpass

103.   Work is well-progressed on a pedestrian railway underpass on The Strand Extension, behind Harbourside Restaurant. This will help ensure the delivery of Stage 1 of the Memorial Park to The Strand coastal pathway can be delivered as currently planned.

104.   Contractors have a three-day window to install the underpass when the railway will be closed (4-6 Jan 2023), otherwise the project will need to be delayed for 12 months to fit within KiwiRail operating restrictions.

Tunks Reserve / Elizabeth Street East

105.   Planning and design work on the Tunks Reserve/Elizabeth Street East streetscape work is progressing well, with the development plan completed and the detailed design well underway.

106.   Work on the northern side of Elizabeth Street East, adjacent to the entrance to the car park behind the Regional Council building, will be postponed until the construction of 90 Devonport Rd is almost complete.

Dive Crescent Car Park

107.   The final concept plans for the upgraded Dive Crescent car park are expected at the end of June, with site preparation works to begin in early July.

108.   Onsite works will include an upgrade of the area surrounding and including Fixation Coffee, and the leased car park area on the southern side of Fixation Coffee.

Attachments

1.       Bay Venues Quarterly Report relating to Quarter 3 - A13583219   


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 


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Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

11.7       Draft strategic framework

File Number:           A13384633

Author:                    Anne Payne, Strategic Advisor

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       This report proposes a strategic framework with high level content for Council to consider and adopt as a draft for public consultation.  This report sits alongside the draft environment strategy and draft inclusive city strategy report on this agenda.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the Draft Strategic Framework Report.

(b)     Adopts the draft framework and high-level content, Our Direction – Tauranga 2050, as a draft for public consultation, incorporating any amendments as directed by Council at this meeting.

(c)     Delegates the Group Manager: Strategy & Growth to approve the final wording of amendments (as per Council direction) prior to public consultation.

 

Executive Summary

2.       The strategic framework refresh project aligns Council’s strategies and plans so that Council’s strategic direction – what we are aiming to achieve for our communities – is clearer and more understandable for our communities and our own staff.

3.       This project has run in parallel with the City Vision project to ensure that our refreshed strategic framework incorporates and reflects the new Vision for Tauranga, endorsed as a vision for the city and adopted as Council’s Vision for Tauranga on 13 June 2022.

4.       Our framework is based around our five community outcomes (what we seek to achieve for our communities) and our three approaches (how we do everything), which taken together identify how and what Council contributes to achieving the Vision for Tauranga.  We are working on a diagram that shows how our outcomes and approaches weave together and look forward to sharing this when available.

5.       The strategic framework comprises our Vision, primary strategies (one for each community outcome), and a set of action and investment plans to deliver the strategies.  This project will ensure all strategies and plans are current and can be used to identify the right projects and initiatives to drive into the Long-term Plan 2024-2034, and potentially into the 2023/24 Annual Plan.  The project will also put in place monitoring, reporting and review processes, to ensure our streamlined suite of strategies and plans are implemented and remain current over time.

6.       This report provides the draft strategic framework and high-level content contained in Our Direction – Tauranga 2050 (Attachment 2) for Council to adopt as a draft for public consultation.

7.       The consultation is proposed to run for four weeks from 11 July to 5 August 2022.  It will run in conjunction with consultation on our two new draft strategies, Tauranga Mataraunui – Inclusive City Strategy 2022-2023 and Tauranga Taurikura – Environment Strategy 2022-2032. 

8.       We will report back on 5 September for Council to adopt the final strategic framework and, pending community feedback, the two strategies.

Background

9.       The strategic framework project concept was approved by the Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee on 28 June 2021[1].  The project concept envisaged drawing on information received through prior engagement processes as far as possible, and comprised two parts:

(a)     Working with the community to develop a City Vision for Tauranga, and

(b)     Refreshing Tauranga City Council’s strategic framework to ensure Council’s strategic direction contributes to that City Vision and is clearly articulated and understood.

10.     Progress on the Council’s strategic framework refresh was reported to Council on 13 September 2021[2], the Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee on 1 November 2021[3], and on 16 May 2022[4].  

11.     On 13 June 2022, Council endorsed the Vision for Tauranga as a vision for the city, and also adopted the vision as Council’s Vision for Tauranga.  The vision and strategic framework workstreams of the overall project have worked closely together to ensure Council’s new Vision for Tauranga is accurately incorporated into Council’s strategic framework.

Project purpose

12.     The framework will provide a clear line of sight between the vision for Tauranga, Tauranga City Council’s community outcomes and the ‘what and how’ of council delivering on its commitments.  The project process has also allowed the council to identify gaps in its strategies and plans and to enable these gaps to be acknowledged and addressed.

13.     For Tauranga City Council, the key outcomes from this project are that:

(a)     Our community and partners will be easily able to see how the organisation is contributing to our adopted community outcomes and the vision for Tauranga.

(b)     Our governance and staff will have a shared understanding of what the organisation is trying to achieve and how we aim to get there, and our people will know how they contribute.

(c)     We will be guided by a set of current, relevant, and succinct strategic documents, which ‘weave together’ where this makes sense.

(d)     We will have a clear focus for evaluating existing programmes, and those considered in the future, to ensure all efforts support our overarching purpose.

(e)     The refreshed and fit for purpose set of strategies and action plans will provide future council governance teams with a clear roadmap to continue progress towards the community outcomes and vision.

Project outputs

14.     Primarily web-based – our refreshed strategic framework is envisaged as primarily a web-based tool publicly available on Council’s website.  This web-based structure will give us more flexibility to show that our strategies and plans normally contribute to more than one community outcome. It is more difficult to show this relationship in a written format.

15.     Printable documents – a range of printable documents will also be available from the website. This will include a high-level summary of Council’s strategic direction, as well as printable strategies and action plans.

16.     Refreshed strategies and plans – all strategies and action plans will be updated as 2022 documents, or underway/planned and scheduled for completion by early 2023, to inform the upcoming 2024-2034 Long-term plan development.  (Note: joint strategies and plans cannot be updated as part of this process, but review points identified will be fed into the next review process for each joint strategy or plan).

17.     Rescinding those no longer required – a process will be developed to formally rescind any strategies and plans that have been superseded or are no longer needed, along with a programme to complete this work.

18.     Tracking our progress and keeping it relevant – responsibilities for monitoring and reporting on progress will be assigned, and processes and systems put in place to enable this to be delivered.  This includes monitoring and reporting at action level right through to outcome level, as well as managing review timeframes for the suite of strategies and plans. 

Project timelines

19.     The project has been scheduled within tight timeframes to enable our strategic framework, including any new strategies and action plans, to guide development of our next Long-term Plan.  These timeframes also allow the strategic framework to be in place ahead of the 2023/24 Annual Plan.

20.     To meet these timeframes, we will need any new strategies and action plans to be in place close to the end of this calendar year.[5] 

discussion – Council’s draft strategic framework

21.     The strategic framework is simply how we align our strategies and action plans to ensure that we do the right things to contribute to a better Tauranga now and in the future. 

22.     To do so we must be clear about what we are aiming for, have the right strategies and plans in place, ensure these are funded and delivered, and check progress to correct the course where needed. 

23.     The diagram below shows where our strategic framework fits in our planning cycle, with the changes made through this project identified in green text:

24.     The driver for the project was the council’s perceived lack of strategic direction, in part due to the numerous unconnected strategies and plans confusing the landscape for both the council staff and our communities. 

25.     We have created a framework that aligns our strategies and plans to clearly contribute to Council’s five adopted community outcomes, which is how Council contributes to the citywide vision for Tauranga.  Council’s five community outcomes are that Tauranga is:

·        An inclusive city – Tauranga Mataraunui

·        A city that values, protects and enhances our environment [6]  – Tauranga Taurikura

·        A well planned city – Tauranga Tātaitia rā

·        A city that we can move around easily – Tauranga Aru Rau

·        A city that supports business and education – Tauranga Eke Tangaroa.

26.     Additionally, our framework brings focus to our three approaches which are about the way we do things, so are principles-based rather than actions focused.  These are deliberately intentional focus areas that commit us to doing things differently, and making this change consistently across the organisation and over time.  These are our approaches to:

·        Te Ao Māori (developed in partnership with Tangata Whenua)

·        Sustainability (incorporating social, economic, cultural and environmental aspects of sustainability), and

·        Working beyond Tauranga (particularly how we contribute to the wider region, upper north island).

27.     A one-page summary showing our high-level strategic direction is included on page 4 of the draft Our Direction – Tauranga 2050 document (Attachment 2 to this report).

28.     We are working on a graphic that will depict how the elements of our new framework weave together, how interconnected they are, and that is localised to Tauranga.  We look forward to sharing this concept once it is further refined.

29.     Our strategic framework will enable us to better balance our strategic direction and priorities across the social, environmental, economic and cultural aspects of community wellbeing.

30.     The lack of an overarching vision for Tauranga has also contributed to Council’s perceived lack of strategic direction.  The parallel workstream to this project facilitated development of a vision for Tauranga.  On 13 June 2022, Council both endorsed the vision for Tauranga for others to use, and adopted it as Council’s vision for Tauranga.

 

Framework structure and content

31.     To make our strategies and plans more accessible, we are streamlining them and including information about how they work together.  We have developed a very simple hierarchy and some clear guidance for what a strategy or action plan should include.  All strategies and action and investment plans will be succinct, action-focused documents that support Council to deliver at pace and with purpose for our communities.

32.     The concept for our strategic framework hierarchy is shown in the diagram below.  This diagram describes the levels in our framework, moving from strategy to action as we move down each level, so does not identify specific community outcomes, strategies or action plans.

 

33.     A more detailed explanation of each of the levels of the framework was provided in the 16 May 2022 report to the Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee[7].

34.     A diagram showing the full framework structure, excluding specific action and investment plans, is included as Attachment 1 to this report.

35.     Key points to note are:

High level content – vision and ‘at a glance’ summaries

(a)     Our new Vision for Tauranga provides a long-term aspiration for the city out to 2050.  We have mirrored this timeframe for our strategic framework, particularly at the ‘At a Glance’ level.  Our primary strategies will range from 10 years out to 2050 (now just under 30 years), while our action and investment (action) plans will normally range from 3 to 10 years.  This is a general guide only.

(b)     The levels of the hierarchy signal increasing levels of detail from ‘at a glance’ summaries to action plans. All levels are equally important, each is a critical component required to achieve the council’s goals for our communities.

(c)     In line with the high-level nature of the ‘at a glance’ summaries, progress measures within these documents are high-level and focus on trends for a few key indicators.  Progress measures become more detailed as you move down the hierarchy.

(d)     We have drafted a summary of Council’s strategic direction that links the Vision for Tauranga with Council’s strategic framework (our response to the vision).  This document is designed to provide a headline summary of the council’s direction of travel at a particular point in time and once finalised, is envisaged to be one of our first printable documents for the framework. 

(e)     With a working title of Our Direction – Tauranga 2050, this draft document will form the basis of our consultation material and is provided as Attachment 2 to this report. 


 

Strategies and action and investment plans

(f)      As envisaged, we needed new primary strategies for our two ‘critical gap’ community outcomes of Inclusive City and Valued & Protected Environment.   Both strategies have been drafted through the project workstreams involving staff and key external stakeholders. 

(g)     Refer to a separate report on this agenda for further information about the Draft Tauranga Taurikura – Environment Strategy and the Draft Tauranga Mataraunui – Inclusive City Strategy.

(h)     Our new strategies are brief high-level documents that will show where they fit within our strategic framework and within our wider strategic context, and will identify the action plans that will implement them.  Implementation plans will now be included only in the action plans, rather than within strategies themselves.

(i)      The five community outcome workstreams are also assessing existing strategies and plans that contribute to their outcome, many of which are wholly or partly outdated or have been implemented.  There are currently more than 60, including many joint strategies and plans that cannot be unilaterally updated.  We will take our assessments of Council actions within our existing joint strategies through to the next review for each of these strategies.

(j)      The workstreams have identified a suite of potential action plans that will together deliver what Council is aiming to achieve for the communities of Tauranga, now and in the future.  A very simplified diagram showing current thinking was provided to the 16 May 2022 Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee.[8]  Further work is underway to confirm and develop the final action plans.

Consultation on the draft strategic framework

36.     This report seeks Council approval to consult on the draft strategic framework and its high-level content contained in the draft Our Direction – Tauranga 2050 document (Attachment 2 to this report).

37.     Consultation will run for four weeks from 11 July to 5 August 2022. 

38.     The amended draft framework, including the Our Direction – Tauranga 2050 summary document, will be brought back to Council for adoption on 5 September 2022.

39.     The purpose of this consultation is to ensure anyone who may have a potential interest in the strategic framework has an opportunity to have their say.  Communication about the consultation will be targeted for different audiences and people involved in existing or proposed strategies and action plans will be prioritised.

40.     Community consultation will focus on the following two questions:

(a)     Does this draft strategic framework provide sufficient clarity about how the Council’s strategies and plans fit together? 

(i)      Yes/No – if no, how do you think it could be improved?

(b)     The community outcomes were adopted by the Council in March 2021 as part of the 2021-2031 Long-term Plan development process.  For each outcome we have summarised Council’s response ‘at a glance’.  These summaries are contained in the Our Direction – Tauranga 2050 document.

For as many of the outcomes that you wish to comment on:  does the ‘At a Glance’ summary sufficiently capture the key issues and Council actions that it needs to? 

(i)      Yes/No – if no, what gaps are there that you think need to be addressed?

41.     The responses to these questions will help inform the final strategic framework, including high level content and proposed action plans.

42.     Additionally, community consultation will be an opportunity to begin to engage people on development of our action and investment plans, particularly any interested people that weren’t aware of the work to date.  The consultation material will reference this opportunity and ask people to indicate any plans they are particularly interested in being involved with.

43.     We note that this consultation process will be run in conjunction with consultation on the draft Tauranga Taurikura – Environment Strategy and Tauranga Mataraunui – Inclusive City strategies (refer to the separate report on this agenda).

Strategic / Statutory Context

44.     The strategic framework project is a process (alongside the development of a vision for Tauranga) to align all of Council’s strategies and plans.  

45.     The framework will provide a clear line of sight between the Vision for Tauranga, Council’s community outcomes and the ‘what and how’ of Tauranga City Council delivering on its commitments.  The framework process will also allow Council to identify any gaps in its strategies and plans, enabling these gaps to be acknowledged and addressed.

Options Analysis

46.     Two options are identified in the tables below, which outline the benefits, disadvantages and key risks for both options.

Option 1 – Adopt draft strategic framework for public consultation (RECOMMENDED)

Description

Adopt the draft strategic framework including the high-level content contained in Our Direction – Tauranga 2050, as outlined in this paper, for public consultation (incorporating any specific amendments as directed at this meeting and delegating the General Manager: Strategy and Growth to approve final wording of the amended documents).

Benefits

Disadvantages

Key risks

Clear strategic direction will be formalised in time to guide 2024-2034 Long-term plan development.

Staff time can be used more effectively, as less time will be spent on determining strategic priorities and re-creating base work for each long-term plan.

Our delivery is prioritised and targeted to meet our strategic priorities, resulting in better outcomes for our communities.

Our communities, stakeholders and partners can have more confidence in Council’s planning and delivery processes.

 

Timeframes for this project are tight.  As a result, the proposed public consultation on the draft framework will be limited in its scope and reach.

Some of our communities feel they haven’t had an opportunity to be involved in the strategic framework development.

 

Option 2 – Do not adopt the draft strategic framework for public consultation

Description

Do not adopt the draft strategic framework, as outlined in this paper, for public consultation.

Benefits

Disadvantages

Key risks

More time to engage or consult with affected communities, stakeholders and partners.

May not have clear strategic direction formalised in time to guide 2024-2034 Long-term Plan development.

Council’s lack of clear, coherent strategic direction continues to negatively impact on staff through difficulty in determining priorities and needing to start from scratch for each long-term plan process.

Council’s lack of clear, coherent strategic direction continues to confuse and frustrate our communities, stakeholders and partners.

Sub-optimal 2024-2034 Long-term Plan process and outcome/content.

Internal misalignment or conflict between priorities, leading to staff disengagement.

Lack of clarity for our communities, stakeholders and partners, leading to disengagement from Council.

Loss of potential funding, particularly from central government and key city partners.

 

47.     Option one is the recommended option.  Although timing is a limiting factor, we have taken into account the significant feedback from our communities, stakeholders and partners over recent years.  This leads us to the view that there is likely to be greater community interest in the strategies and action plans within our strategic framework than in the framework itself. 

48.     We note that development of new or reviewed strategies and action plans will follow their own consultation and engagement processes, which will provide opportunities for our communities, stakeholders and partners to be involved.

Financial Considerations

49.     The costs of consultation are minimal, with consultation material having been anticipated within the project budget.  The potential costs of implementing the refreshed strategic direction will be addressed at a project level in the action and investment plans, and then flow into Annual Plan and LTP processes. 

Legal Implications / Risks

50.     Potential legal implications relate primarily to meeting the Local Government Act 2022 significance and engagement requirements for public consultation.  These implications have been carefully considered and mitigated, as outlined in the Consultation section of this report. 

51.     Risks associated with the project have been considered during planning and implementation of the workstreams for each ‘strand’ of the framework.

52.     A key risk to delivery of the project within targeted timeframes relates to potential Covid-19 impacts on staff, consultants, and key stakeholders for the project.  While we continue to manage around the people impacts from Covid-19 as far as possible, our reality is that if key people are impacted at critical times, some timeframes may need to move as a result.  At this stage no major targets have been missed for this reason, but this risk will remain for the duration of the project.

Significance

53.     The Local Government Act 2002 requires an assessment of the significance of matters, issues, proposals and decisions in this report against Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.  Council acknowledges that in some instances a matter, issue, proposal or decision may have a medium degree of importance to individuals, groups, or agencies affected by the report.

54.     In making this assessment, consideration has been given to the likely impact, and likely consequences for:

(a)   the current and future social, economic, environmental, or cultural well-being of the district or region

(b)   any persons who are likely to be particularly affected by, or interested in, the proposal.

(c)   the capacity of the local authority to perform its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

55.     In accordance with the considerations above, criteria and thresholds in the policy, it is considered that the proposal to adopt Tauranga City Council’s draft strategic framework for public consultation is of medium significance.

CONSULTATION / ENGAGEMENT

56.     Taking into consideration the above assessment, that the proposal to adopt Tauranga City Council’s draft strategic framework for public consultation is of medium significance, staff are of the opinion that the nature of this project requires our communities’ involvement as outlined in this report.

57.     There has been considerable consultation and engagement with our communities to date, as referenced in the background section of this report.  Further involvement with both the general community and key stakeholders is outlined in the consultation and next steps sections of this report.

Next Steps

58.     Pending decisions from this Council meeting, key steps for the remainder of the project and beyond are:

(a)     11 July to 5 August:  Community feedback sought on the draft framework and high level content.

(b)     Mid-August:  Staff will analyse feedback and make recommendations on changes.

(c)     Council 5 September:  adopt a final version of the framework and high level content, along with a programme of work to complete development of any remaining action and investment plans.  This will close the project.

(d)     Post-project work – September through to early 2023:  includes completing any remaining action plans as programmed, formally rescinding superseded strategies, and implementing ongoing strategy (and action plan) monitoring and review processes.

(e)     Council early 2023: adopt any updates to the framework and the documents within it once all action plans have been finalised. 

(i)      Council will adopt the draft Tauranga Taurikura – Environment Strategy and draft Tauranga Mataraunui – Inclusive City Strategy goals ‘in principle’ until the action plans to deliver those strategies have been completed.  This will enable strategy goals, and potentially the related community outcome ‘at a glance’ summary, to be updated where required to ensure consistency throughout the levels of our framework.

59.     Note:  Development of individual strategies and action plans will follow their own consultation and engagement processes.  For efficiency, we will seek to dovetail these consultation and engagement processes in with the wider framework processes where these align. 

Attachments

1.       Proposed strategic framework structure - A13585483

2.       Draft 'Our Direction - Tauranga 2050' - A13581623   


Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

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Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

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Ordinary Council meeting Agenda

27 June 2022

 

11.8       Draft Environment Strategy and Draft Inclusive City Strategy

File Number:           A13508410

Author:                    Rebecca Scott, Principal Strategic Advisor

Nick Chester, Inclusive Cities Advisor

Anne Payne, Strategic Advisor

Authoriser:             Christine Jones, General Manager: Strategy & Growth

 

Purpose of the Report

1.       This report provides the draft Environment Strategy and the draft Inclusive City Strategy for Council to consider and adopt as drafts for public consultation.  This report sits alongside the draft strategic framework report on this agenda.

Recommendations

That the Council:

(a)     Receives the draft Environment Strategy and draft Inclusive City Strategy report.

(b)     Adopts the Draft Tauranga Taurikura – Environment Strategy as a draft for public consultation, once any changes directed at the Council meeting have been incorporated.

(c)     Adopts the Draft Tauranga Mataraunui – Inclusive City Strategy as a draft for public consultation, once any changes directed at the Council meeting have been incorporated.

(d)     Delegates the Group Manager: Strategy & Growth to approve the final wording of these amendments and any minor editorial changes prior to public consultation.

(e)     Approves the proposed public consultation process for both draft strategies as outlined in this report.

(f)      Notes that the goals for both strategies are adopted ‘in principle’ and will remain ‘in principle’ until the action and investment plans delivering on the strategies are completed to ensure alignment throughout the final framework.

 

 

Executive Summary

2.       The two draft strategies provided within this report have been developed to address critical gaps in Council’s formal strategic direction.  The strategies have been developed as part of the wider strategic framework project, and the draft strategic framework is reported separately to this Council meeting.

3.       Both draft strategies build on earlier work and input from our communities, particularly the draft Environment Strategy, which completes a process originally started in 2017.

4.       Our new strategies, and the Action and Investment Plans that deliver them, are consciously succinct and action-focused documents. 

5.       The draft Tauranga Taurikura – Environment Strategy 2022-2023 sets out Council’s goals and high-level actions to progress our ‘valued, protected and enhanced environment’ community outcome, which in turn contributes particularly to the ‘prioritising nature’ element of our new Vision for Tauranga.  The draft strategy is provided as Attachment 1 to this report.

6.       The draft Tauranga Mataraunui – Inclusive City Strategy 2022-2023 sets out Council’s goals and high-level actions to progress our ‘an inclusive city’ community outcome, which in turn contributes particularly to the ‘lifting each other up’ element of our new Vision for Tauranga.  The draft strategy is provided as Attachment 2 to this report.

Background

7.       The strategic framework refresh project concept was approved by the Strategy, Finance and Risk Committee on 28 June 2021[9], following several previous iterations of this work.  The two key elements of this project are:

(a)     To work with the community to develop a vision for Tauranga.  This was endorsed and adopted by Council on 13 June 2022.[10]

(b)     To refresh Tauranga City Council’s strategic framework to ensure Council’s strategic direction contributes to that vision for Tauranga, and is clearly articulated and understood.   Progress is reported separately to this meeting in the Draft strategic framework report, which details the background to the overall project including these two workstreams.

8.       The ‘valued, protected and enhanced environment’ and ‘inclusive city’ community outcomes were identified early in the strategic framework project (part b above) as areas in which Council needed much clearer strategic direction. 

9.       The two draft strategies provided in this report have been developed as a first step in meeting this need.  Both draft strategies build on all previous Council work, including a wide range of engagement feedback received from our communities, stakeholders and partners.

DRAFT Tauranga taUrikura – environment strategy 2022-2032

Background and History

10.     In April 2017, Council’s Environment Committee agreed to develop an Environment Strategy to guide the work of Council and identify how the community could contribute to the priority areas and targets once set.

11.     Engagement was undertaken with the community, partners and stakeholders to gain their views on the natural environment, what they valued, what their concerns were, and what Council should be doing better. This was done through two main activities:

(a)     In-depth interviews with people and organisations that were considered to have expertise in and impact on the topics Council was trying to address: partners like Tangata Whenua and the Regional Council, and other stakeholders such as organisations that are active in sustainability and influential in delivering environmental outcomes.

(b)     An online survey gathered insights on what people want for the future of Tauranga’s environment, with over 1,000 responses received.

12.     The Strategy development was intended to consist of 4 stages: to understand our starting point, to create a strategy, to develop action plans, and to deliver on those action plans to implement the strategy.  The first stage was completed in early 2018.  Stage 2 work to create a draft strategy began in early/mid 2018 and was partially completed. Stages 3 and 4 were not started.

2022 Strategy Development Process

13.     Strategy development has benefitted from considerable engagement, both directly with stakeholders during the 2017-2018 process, and indirectly with our communities when we have asked them what is important to them (Vital Updates 2020, My Tauranga Vibe 2021, 2020 strategic conversations workshops, annual residents’ surveys, and a range of submission processes). 

14.     It is very clear that our communities are deeply connected to our natural environment, care about it and want to help protect it.

15.     In February 2022, the environment strategy development was reinitiated as part of the strategic framework project. The draft Tauranga Taurikura – Environment Strategy 2022-2032 is built on previous work and existing knowledge base, including 2021 sustainability stocktake work, and incorporates new legislation and national strategies.

16.     Staff and key external groups and organisations have helped develop this draft strategy, most recently through a workshop in May and subsequent communications to refine the initial draft.  We sought feedback and input from Te Rangapū Mana Whenua o Tauranga Moana on 20 May 2022.

Draft Strategy – Vision and Goals

17.     The vision for the draft strategy is that ‘Tauranga is a city that values our natural environment and outdoor lifestyle, and actively works to protect and enhance it’.

18.     The goals for the draft strategy are goals for the city. Success in achieving our goals cannot be achieved without a commitment by all – the Tauranga community.  To reach our goals, we will need to work together and take responsibility for action, each at our own level.   Actions that will primarily be the responsibility of Council to achieve are highlighted within the Strategy.

19.     The Draft Tauranga Taurikura – Environment Strategy, 2022-2032 is provided as Attachment 1 to this report.

20.     To enable consistency between the strategy and the Action and Investment Plans (‘Action Plans’) currently under development, our intention is to retain the strategy goals ‘in principle’ until all required action plans have been completed.  This will enable the strategy goals (and other elements of the strategic framework such as the Valued, Protected and Enhanced Environment At a Glance) to be updated to reflect learnings during the action plan development processes. 

21.     Our aim is that all new action plans will be in place by early 2023.  Council will formally adopt the entire framework, including At a Glances, strategies and action plans within it, at that point.

Draft Strategy – Key Points

22.     A 10-year horizon for the strategy has been set as there is still significant work that needs to be achieved to understand what good looks like in some areas, for example biodiversity. We also need the time to absorb new and impending legislation, what that means for the council and how we will respond. We propose to review and improve this strategy within 3 years.

23.     Council has some choices to make about how far we aim with this strategy, and the current process, particularly the public consultation process, will help inform those decisions.  The strategy, and the action plans that will deliver on it, are not